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12,082 Research products, page 1 of 1,209

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  • English
    Authors: 
    Savosin, Denis; Ilmast, Nikolay; Kuchko, Yaroslav;
    Publisher: Karelian Research Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences

    The dataset includes data on invasive alien fish species, known from the waterbodies of Republic of Karelia. The data set is based on human observations.

  • Research data . 2012
    English
    Authors: 
    Fisch, Rudolf (Mr);
    Publisher: University of Southern California Digital Library (USC.DL)
  • English
    Authors: 
    Pontier, Ondine;
    Publisher: Hakai Institute
  • Research data . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Costa, Kassandra M; Hayes, Christopher T; Anderson, Robert F; Pavia, Frank J; Bausch, Alexandra Renee; Deng, Feifei; Dutay, Jean-Claude; Geibert, Walter; Heinze, Christoph; Henderson, Gideon M; +24 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: SNSF | SeaO2 - Past changes in S... (144811), ARC | Discovery Projects - Gran... (DP180100048), SNSF | SeaO2 - Past changes in S... (172915)

    In this dataset we present a global compilation of over 1000 sedimentary records of 230Th from across the global ocean at two time slices, the Late Holocene (0-5000 years ago, or 0-5 ka) and the Last Glacial Maximum (18.5-23.5 ka). Data have been screened for age control, errors, and lithogenic corrections. Overall quality levels were computed by summing each record's scores on the individual criteria. A record is optimal if it is based on a chronology that is constrained by δ18O or 14C and it provides both the raw nuclide concentrations and the associated errors. About one quarter of the records in the database achieved this highest quality level. The large majority of the records in the database are good, passing two of the three criteria, while the remaining quarter are of fair or poor quality.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Howald, Sarah; Moyano, Marta; Crespel, Amélie; Kuchenmüller, Luis L; Cominassi, Louise; Claireaux, Guy; Peck, Myron A; Mark, Felix Christopher;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) is a large, economically important fish species with a long generation time whose long-term resilience to ocean acidification (OA) and warming (OW) is not clear. We incubated sea bass from Brittany (France) for two generations (>5 years in total) under ambient and predicted OA conditions (PCO2: 650 and 1700 µatm) crossed with ambient and predicted ocean OW conditions in F1 (temperature: 15-18°C and 20-23°C) to investigate the effects of climate change on larval and juvenile growth and metabolic rate.We found that in F1, OA as single stressor at ambient temperature did not affect larval or juvenile growth and OW increased developmental time and growth rates, but OAW decreased larval size at metamorphosis. Larval routine and juvenile standard metabolic rates were significantly lower in cold compared to warm conditioned fish and also lower in F0 compared to F1 fish. We did not find any effect of OA as a single stressor on metabolic rates. Juvenile PO2crit was not affected by OA or OAW in both generations.We discuss the potential underlying mechanisms resulting in the resilience of F0 and F1 larvae and juveniles to OA and in the beneficial effects of OW on F1 larval growth and metabolic rate, but on the other hand in the vulnerability of F1, but not F0 larvae to OAW. With regard to the ecological perspective, we conclude that recruitment of larvae and early juveniles to nursery areas might decrease under OAW conditions but individuals reaching juvenile phase might benefit from increased performance at higher temperatures. In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Gattuso et al, 2021) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI). The date of carbonate chemistry calculation by seacarb is 2022-06-29.

  • Research data . 2012
    English
    Authors: 
    Unknown;
    Publisher: University of Southern California Digital Library (USC.DL)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wenzh��fer, Frank; Rohardt, Gerd;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | ECO2 (265847)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ackermann, Lars; Danek, Christopher; Gierz, Paul; Lohmann, Gerrit;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    This dataset contains results from simulations with the AWI Earth System Models AWI-ESM with two different model setups: one with an interactive ice sheet model (PISM) for the Greenland ice sheet domain and one without. With both model setups, the Representative Concentration Pathways scenarios RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 were simulated. The simulation runs were prolonged to the year 2200. We investigated the effect of the incorporated ice sheet model on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. As the ice sheet is not only melting but also growing in some areas, the freshwater release is partly compensated. Therefore, the effect on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation is rather small. The dataset contains time series of global average temperature, atmospheric and oceanic freshwater fluxes for the Atlantic catchment area, several ice volume fluxes of the Greenland ice sheet, and the AMOC index. Furthermore, it contains spatial data mostly as anomalies (the last 30 year average minus the control state) of the Greenland ice sheet thickness and mass balance, sea surface salinity and sea ice concentration and precipitation minus evaporation and vertical profiles of anomalies of temperature, salinity, and density for the regions of deep water formation in the North Atlantic. All files are in the NetCDF format.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lichtschlag, Anna; Boetius, Antje; Felden, Janine; de Beer, Dirk;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | HERMIONE (226354)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pape, Thomas; Bahr, André; Rethemeyer, Janet; Kessler, John D; Sahling, Heiko; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Klapp, Stephan A; Reeburgh, William S; Bohrmann, Gerhard;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    Detailed knowledge of the extent of post-genetic modifications affecting shallow submarine hydrocarbons fueled from the deep subsurface is fundamental for evaluating source and reservoir properties. We investigated gases from a submarine high-flux seepage site in the anoxic Eastern Black Sea in order to elucidate molecular and isotopic alterations of low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons (LMWHC) associated with upward migration through the sediment and precipitation of shallow gas hydrates. For this, near-surface sediment pressure cores and free gas venting from the seafloor were collected using autoclave technology at the Batumi seep area at 845 m water depth within the gas hydrate stability zone.Vent gas, gas from pressure core degassing, and from hydrate dissociation were strongly dominated by methane (>99.85 mol.% of Sum[C1-C4, CO2]). Molecular ratios of LMWHC (C1/[C2 + C3] > 1000) and stable isotopic compositions of methane (d13C = -53.5 per mill V-PDB; D/H around -175 per mill SMOW) indicated predominant microbial methane formation. C1/C2+ ratios and stable isotopic compositions of LMWHC distinguished three gas types prevailing in the seepage area. Vent gas discharged into bottom waters was depleted in methane by >0.03 mol.% (Sum[C1-C4, CO2]) relative to the other gas types and the virtual lack of 14C-CH4 indicated a negligible input of methane from degradation of fresh organic matter. Of all gas types analyzed, vent gas was least affected by molecular fractionation, thus, its origin from the deep subsurface rather than from decomposing hydrates in near-surface sediments is likely.As a result of the anaerobic oxidation of methane, LMWHC in pressure cores in top sediments included smaller methane fractions [0.03 mol.% Sum(C1-C4, CO2)] than gas released from pressure cores of more deeply buried sediments, where the fraction of methane was maximal due to its preferential incorporation in hydrate lattices. No indications for stable carbon isotopic fractionations of methane during hydrate crystallization from vent gas were found. Enrichments of 14C-CH4 (1.4 pMC) in short cores relative to lower abundances (max. 0.6 pMC) in gas from long cores and gas hydrates substantiates recent methanogenesis utilizing modern organic matter deposited in top sediments of this high-flux hydrocarbon seep area.

Advanced search in Research products
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The following results are related to European Marine Science. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
12,082 Research products, page 1 of 1,209
  • English
    Authors: 
    Savosin, Denis; Ilmast, Nikolay; Kuchko, Yaroslav;
    Publisher: Karelian Research Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences

    The dataset includes data on invasive alien fish species, known from the waterbodies of Republic of Karelia. The data set is based on human observations.

  • Research data . 2012
    English
    Authors: 
    Fisch, Rudolf (Mr);
    Publisher: University of Southern California Digital Library (USC.DL)
  • English
    Authors: 
    Pontier, Ondine;
    Publisher: Hakai Institute
  • Research data . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Costa, Kassandra M; Hayes, Christopher T; Anderson, Robert F; Pavia, Frank J; Bausch, Alexandra Renee; Deng, Feifei; Dutay, Jean-Claude; Geibert, Walter; Heinze, Christoph; Henderson, Gideon M; +24 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: SNSF | SeaO2 - Past changes in S... (144811), ARC | Discovery Projects - Gran... (DP180100048), SNSF | SeaO2 - Past changes in S... (172915)

    In this dataset we present a global compilation of over 1000 sedimentary records of 230Th from across the global ocean at two time slices, the Late Holocene (0-5000 years ago, or 0-5 ka) and the Last Glacial Maximum (18.5-23.5 ka). Data have been screened for age control, errors, and lithogenic corrections. Overall quality levels were computed by summing each record's scores on the individual criteria. A record is optimal if it is based on a chronology that is constrained by δ18O or 14C and it provides both the raw nuclide concentrations and the associated errors. About one quarter of the records in the database achieved this highest quality level. The large majority of the records in the database are good, passing two of the three criteria, while the remaining quarter are of fair or poor quality.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Howald, Sarah; Moyano, Marta; Crespel, Amélie; Kuchenmüller, Luis L; Cominassi, Louise; Claireaux, Guy; Peck, Myron A; Mark, Felix Christopher;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) is a large, economically important fish species with a long generation time whose long-term resilience to ocean acidification (OA) and warming (OW) is not clear. We incubated sea bass from Brittany (France) for two generations (>5 years in total) under ambient and predicted OA conditions (PCO2: 650 and 1700 µatm) crossed with ambient and predicted ocean OW conditions in F1 (temperature: 15-18°C and 20-23°C) to investigate the effects of climate change on larval and juvenile growth and metabolic rate.We found that in F1, OA as single stressor at ambient temperature did not affect larval or juvenile growth and OW increased developmental time and growth rates, but OAW decreased larval size at metamorphosis. Larval routine and juvenile standard metabolic rates were significantly lower in cold compared to warm conditioned fish and also lower in F0 compared to F1 fish. We did not find any effect of OA as a single stressor on metabolic rates. Juvenile PO2crit was not affected by OA or OAW in both generations.We discuss the potential underlying mechanisms resulting in the resilience of F0 and F1 larvae and juveniles to OA and in the beneficial effects of OW on F1 larval growth and metabolic rate, but on the other hand in the vulnerability of F1, but not F0 larvae to OAW. With regard to the ecological perspective, we conclude that recruitment of larvae and early juveniles to nursery areas might decrease under OAW conditions but individuals reaching juvenile phase might benefit from increased performance at higher temperatures. In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Gattuso et al, 2021) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI). The date of carbonate chemistry calculation by seacarb is 2022-06-29.

  • Research data . 2012
    English
    Authors: 
    Unknown;
    Publisher: University of Southern California Digital Library (USC.DL)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wenzh��fer, Frank; Rohardt, Gerd;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | ECO2 (265847)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ackermann, Lars; Danek, Christopher; Gierz, Paul; Lohmann, Gerrit;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    This dataset contains results from simulations with the AWI Earth System Models AWI-ESM with two different model setups: one with an interactive ice sheet model (PISM) for the Greenland ice sheet domain and one without. With both model setups, the Representative Concentration Pathways scenarios RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 were simulated. The simulation runs were prolonged to the year 2200. We investigated the effect of the incorporated ice sheet model on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. As the ice sheet is not only melting but also growing in some areas, the freshwater release is partly compensated. Therefore, the effect on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation is rather small. The dataset contains time series of global average temperature, atmospheric and oceanic freshwater fluxes for the Atlantic catchment area, several ice volume fluxes of the Greenland ice sheet, and the AMOC index. Furthermore, it contains spatial data mostly as anomalies (the last 30 year average minus the control state) of the Greenland ice sheet thickness and mass balance, sea surface salinity and sea ice concentration and precipitation minus evaporation and vertical profiles of anomalies of temperature, salinity, and density for the regions of deep water formation in the North Atlantic. All files are in the NetCDF format.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lichtschlag, Anna; Boetius, Antje; Felden, Janine; de Beer, Dirk;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | HERMIONE (226354)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pape, Thomas; Bahr, André; Rethemeyer, Janet; Kessler, John D; Sahling, Heiko; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Klapp, Stephan A; Reeburgh, William S; Bohrmann, Gerhard;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    Detailed knowledge of the extent of post-genetic modifications affecting shallow submarine hydrocarbons fueled from the deep subsurface is fundamental for evaluating source and reservoir properties. We investigated gases from a submarine high-flux seepage site in the anoxic Eastern Black Sea in order to elucidate molecular and isotopic alterations of low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons (LMWHC) associated with upward migration through the sediment and precipitation of shallow gas hydrates. For this, near-surface sediment pressure cores and free gas venting from the seafloor were collected using autoclave technology at the Batumi seep area at 845 m water depth within the gas hydrate stability zone.Vent gas, gas from pressure core degassing, and from hydrate dissociation were strongly dominated by methane (>99.85 mol.% of Sum[C1-C4, CO2]). Molecular ratios of LMWHC (C1/[C2 + C3] > 1000) and stable isotopic compositions of methane (d13C = -53.5 per mill V-PDB; D/H around -175 per mill SMOW) indicated predominant microbial methane formation. C1/C2+ ratios and stable isotopic compositions of LMWHC distinguished three gas types prevailing in the seepage area. Vent gas discharged into bottom waters was depleted in methane by >0.03 mol.% (Sum[C1-C4, CO2]) relative to the other gas types and the virtual lack of 14C-CH4 indicated a negligible input of methane from degradation of fresh organic matter. Of all gas types analyzed, vent gas was least affected by molecular fractionation, thus, its origin from the deep subsurface rather than from decomposing hydrates in near-surface sediments is likely.As a result of the anaerobic oxidation of methane, LMWHC in pressure cores in top sediments included smaller methane fractions [0.03 mol.% Sum(C1-C4, CO2)] than gas released from pressure cores of more deeply buried sediments, where the fraction of methane was maximal due to its preferential incorporation in hydrate lattices. No indications for stable carbon isotopic fractionations of methane during hydrate crystallization from vent gas were found. Enrichments of 14C-CH4 (1.4 pMC) in short cores relative to lower abundances (max. 0.6 pMC) in gas from long cores and gas hydrates substantiates recent methanogenesis utilizing modern organic matter deposited in top sediments of this high-flux hydrocarbon seep area.