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2,123 Research products, page 1 of 213

  • European Marine Science
  • Other research products
  • 2018-2022
  • European Marine Science

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Heitland, Tim;
    Publisher: Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mogollón, J. M.; Dale, A. W.; Fossing, H.; Regnier, P.;
    Project: EC | BONUS+ (217246)

    Arkona Basin (southwestern Baltic Sea) is a seasonally-hypoxic basin characterized by the presence of free methane gas in its youngest organic-rich muddy stratum. Through the use of reactive transport models, this study tracks the development of the methane geochemistry in Arkona Basin as this muddy sediment became deposited during the last 8 kyr. Four cores are modeled each pertaining to a unique geochemical scenario according to their respective contemporary geochemical profiles. Ultimately the thickness of the muddy sediment and the flux of particulate organic carbon are crucial in determining the advent of both methanogenesis and free methane gas, the timescales over which methanogenesis takes over as a dominant reaction pathway for organic matter degradation, and the timescales required for free methane gas to form.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nixdorf, Uwe; Dethloff, Klaus; Rex, Markus; Shupe, Matthew; Sommerfeld, Anja; Perovich, Donald K.; Nicolaus, Marcel; Heuzé, Céline; Rabe, Benjamin; Loose, Brice; +31 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Germany

    For years, the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), together with the international MOSAiC partners, had been planning and developing the scientific, logistical and financial concept for the implementation of the MOSAiC expedition. The planning and organization of this endeavor was an enormous e˙ort, involving more than 80 institutions from 20 countries. The number of groups and individuals that significantly contributed to the success of the drift observatory goes far beyond the scope of usual polar expeditions.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dziadek, Ricarda;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    This dataset compiles in-situ temperature measurements for geothermal heat flow estimates and water temperature profiles of the water column, extracted from Miniaturized Temperature data-Logger (MTL). The data were collected during RV POLARSTERN cruise PS104 in 2017 in Amundsen Sea.

  • Open Access Persian
    Authors: 
    Zamani, A.; Ghaffari, A.;

    In this research, the pennyroyal extract (PE) effect was studied at different concentrations (0, 2 and 4% w/v) on chemical and bacterial quality of surimi produced from common Kilka over a period of 15 days (0, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 days) during refrigerator storage (4±1°C). The experiments was conducted to determine chemical tests including peroxide value (PV), thiobarbitoric acid (TBA), total volatile bases nitrogen (TVB-N), pH and total viable count (TVC) and psychrophilic count (PTC) as bacterial tests at 3 days intervals with triplicate. Findings showed that the PV content was significantly higher than that from control treatment as it was increased from 0.64 on the first day to 5.41 meq O2 on the 12th day (p0.05); but it was remained lower than the proposed acceptable limit (7 log cfu/g). Based on the findings of the present study, 4% PE can use for enhance the shelf life of the common kilka surimi at refrigerator. Published

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Provoost, P.; Heuven, S.; Soetaert, K.; Laane, R. W. P. M.; Middelburg, J. J.;
    Project: EC | EPOCA (211384)

    Recent observations and modelling studies suggest that biogeochemical changes can mask atmospheric CO2-induced pH decreases. Data collected by the Dutch monitoring authorities in different coastal systems (North Sea, Wadden Sea, Ems-Dollard, Eastern Scheldt and Scheldt estuary) since 1975 provide an excellent opportunity to test whether this is the case in the Dutch coastal zone. The time-series were analysed using Multi-Resolution Analysis (MRA) which resulted in the identification of system-dependent patterns on both seasonal and intra-annual time scales. The observed rates of pH change greatly exceed those expected from enhanced CO2 uptake, thus suggesting that other biogeochemical processes, possibly related to changes in nutrient loading, can play a dominant role in ocean acidification.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Waska, Hannelore; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen; Massmann, Gudrun; Koschinsky, Andrea; Schnetger, Bernhard; Simon, Heike; Dittmar, Thorsten;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    Data from pore water (subterranean estuary) and seawater from Spiekeroog south (near ICBM time series station and campsite, 53°45'13.5"N 7°40'22.5"E) and west beach ("Sturmeck", 53°46'10.0"N 7°40'26.2"E). South beach data were collected in August 2012, and west beach data were collected in November 2012. Sample abbreviations: SB=South Beach, WB=West Beach. DUNE=most landward station near dunes, MIX=mid-way station between dune base and low water line, LTWL=low tide water line. Pore water (DUNE, MIX, LTWL) sample collection was conducted at different sediment depths (50, 100, 150 cm below sediment surface). Stainless steel push-point lancets were insetred into the sediment, and pore water was withdrawn via vacuum (hand pumps) into nalgene polycarbonate bottles. Filtration was done using inline PES cartridge filters. The vacuum bottles were argon gas-flushed to avoid oxygen contamination. Sea water (SW) was collected with polycarbonate bottles and from LDPE seepage meter bags (SP) and filtered upon return to the laboratory (same day, PES filter cartridges). Sample collection was trace organic and metal clean (soaking and rinsing of bottles, tubing, and filters with diluted HNO3 and HCl suprapur), with sample materials consisting of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polycarbonate. Solid-phase extraction was done with BOND Elut PPL cartridges and elution with Methanol Optima grade. Measurements were done with VA Computrace 757 (Cu ligand concentrations and stability constants), HR-ICP-MS (Cu, Fe, and Mn concentrations), FT-ICR-MS (DOM), spectrophotometry (nutrients), and TOC analyzer (DOC and TDN). Trace metal concentrations (Fe, Cu, Mn) and speciation (oxidation state, size fractions, and organic association), as well as nitrogen species and concentrations: "Spiekeroog beach subterranean estuary environmental data". Concentrations (µM or nM) are denoted in the headers. CuL1=Cu-binding ligands concentrations (nM), logK1=Cu-binding ligand stability constant. Molecular composition of dissolved organic matter and associated Fe and Cu: "Spiekeroog beach STE_ESI_x_Crosstab_x". pos & neg = positive and negative ionization mode. BSA & NWA = basic/strong acidic and neutral/weak acidic, refer to the extracted DOM fraction. Processed figures and tables based on the original data are published here: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2019.06.004

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tessin, Allyson; März, Christian; Kędra, Monika; Matthiessen, Jens; Morata, Nathalie; Nairn, Michael; O'Regan, Matthew; Peeken, Ilka;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | PaNDA (709175)

    The Arctic Ocean region is currently undergoing dramatic changes, which will likely alter the nutrient cycles that underpin Arctic marine ecosystems. Phosphate is a key limiting nutrient for marine life but gaps in our understanding of the Arctic phosphorus (P) cycle persist. In this study, we investigate the benthic burial and recycling of phosphorus using sediments and pore waters from the Eurasian Arctic margin, including the Barents Sea slope and the Yermak Plateau. Our results highlight that P is generally lost from sediments with depth during organic matter respiration. On the Yermak Plateau, remobilization of P results in a diffusive flux of P to the seafloor of between 96 and 261 μmol m−2 yr−1. On the Barents Sea slope, diffusive fluxes of P are much larger (1736–2449 μmol m−2 yr−1), but these fluxes are into near-surface sediments rather than to the bottom waters. The difference in cycling on the Barents Sea slope is controlled by higher fluxes of fresh organic matter and active iron cycling. As changes in primary productivity, ocean circulation and glacial melt continue, benthic P cycling is likely to be altered with implications for P imported into the Arctic Ocean Basin.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Robinson, Tiera-Brandy; Stolle, Christian; Wurl, Oliver;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    Biochemical data from 3 different regions; Cape Verde, the Baltic Sea, and Norwegian fjords/Sea. discreet samples for TEP, Chl a, POC, PON and nutrients as well as 2 and 24 hour average data on sea state parameters; temperature, salinity, PAR and wind speed. Vertical profile data for TEP, POC, TCN, small autotrophs and Chl a are also presented for depths of 0-2m, sampled in the Baltic and Norwegian Seas.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Van Audenhaege, Loïc; Broad, Emmeline; Hendry, Katharine R; Huvenne, Veerle A I;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | iAtlantic (818123), EC | ICY-LAB (678371)

    We used a multibeam echosounder (Reson7125) front-mounted onto the ROV Isis (Dive D333, DY081 expedition) to map the terrain of a vertical feature marking the edge of a deep-sea glacial trough (Labrador Sea, [63°51.9'N, 53°16.9'W, depth: 650 to 800 m]). After correction of the ROV navigation (i.e. merging of USBL and DVL), bathymetry [m] and backscatter [nominal unit] were extracted at a resolution of 0.3 m and different terrain descriptors were computed: Slope, Bathymetric Position Index (BPI), Terrain Ruggedness Index, Roughness, Mean and Gaussian curvatures and orientations (Northness and Eastness), at scales of 0.9, 3 and 9 m. Using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA), the terrain descriptors enabled to retrieve 4 terrain clusters and their associated confusion index, to investigate the spatial heterogeneity of the terrain. This approach also underlined the presence of geomorphic features in the wall terrain. The extraction of the backscatter intensity for the first time considering vertical terrains, opens space for further acquisition and processing development. Using photographs collected by the ROV Isis (Dive D334, DY081 expedition), epibenthic fauna was annotated. Each image was linked to a terrain cluster in the 3D space and pooled into 20-m² bins of images. A Bray-Curtis dissimilarity matrix was constructed from morphospecies abundances. This enabled to test for differences of assemblage composition among clusters. Few species appeared more abundant in particular clusters such as L. pertusa in high-roughness cluster. However, nMDS suggested differences in assemblage composition but these dissimilarities were not strongly delineated. Whereas the design of this study may have limited distinctive differences among assemblages, this shows the potential of this cost-effective method of top-down habitat mapping to be applied in undersampled benthic habitat in order to provide a priori knwoledge for defining appropriate sampling design.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to European Marine Science. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
2,123 Research products, page 1 of 213
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Heitland, Tim;
    Publisher: Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mogollón, J. M.; Dale, A. W.; Fossing, H.; Regnier, P.;
    Project: EC | BONUS+ (217246)

    Arkona Basin (southwestern Baltic Sea) is a seasonally-hypoxic basin characterized by the presence of free methane gas in its youngest organic-rich muddy stratum. Through the use of reactive transport models, this study tracks the development of the methane geochemistry in Arkona Basin as this muddy sediment became deposited during the last 8 kyr. Four cores are modeled each pertaining to a unique geochemical scenario according to their respective contemporary geochemical profiles. Ultimately the thickness of the muddy sediment and the flux of particulate organic carbon are crucial in determining the advent of both methanogenesis and free methane gas, the timescales over which methanogenesis takes over as a dominant reaction pathway for organic matter degradation, and the timescales required for free methane gas to form.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nixdorf, Uwe; Dethloff, Klaus; Rex, Markus; Shupe, Matthew; Sommerfeld, Anja; Perovich, Donald K.; Nicolaus, Marcel; Heuzé, Céline; Rabe, Benjamin; Loose, Brice; +31 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Germany

    For years, the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), together with the international MOSAiC partners, had been planning and developing the scientific, logistical and financial concept for the implementation of the MOSAiC expedition. The planning and organization of this endeavor was an enormous e˙ort, involving more than 80 institutions from 20 countries. The number of groups and individuals that significantly contributed to the success of the drift observatory goes far beyond the scope of usual polar expeditions.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dziadek, Ricarda;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    This dataset compiles in-situ temperature measurements for geothermal heat flow estimates and water temperature profiles of the water column, extracted from Miniaturized Temperature data-Logger (MTL). The data were collected during RV POLARSTERN cruise PS104 in 2017 in Amundsen Sea.

  • Open Access Persian
    Authors: 
    Zamani, A.; Ghaffari, A.;

    In this research, the pennyroyal extract (PE) effect was studied at different concentrations (0, 2 and 4% w/v) on chemical and bacterial quality of surimi produced from common Kilka over a period of 15 days (0, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 days) during refrigerator storage (4±1°C). The experiments was conducted to determine chemical tests including peroxide value (PV), thiobarbitoric acid (TBA), total volatile bases nitrogen (TVB-N), pH and total viable count (TVC) and psychrophilic count (PTC) as bacterial tests at 3 days intervals with triplicate. Findings showed that the PV content was significantly higher than that from control treatment as it was increased from 0.64 on the first day to 5.41 meq O2 on the 12th day (p0.05); but it was remained lower than the proposed acceptable limit (7 log cfu/g). Based on the findings of the present study, 4% PE can use for enhance the shelf life of the common kilka surimi at refrigerator. Published

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Provoost, P.; Heuven, S.; Soetaert, K.; Laane, R. W. P. M.; Middelburg, J. J.;
    Project: EC | EPOCA (211384)

    Recent observations and modelling studies suggest that biogeochemical changes can mask atmospheric CO2-induced pH decreases. Data collected by the Dutch monitoring authorities in different coastal systems (North Sea, Wadden Sea, Ems-Dollard, Eastern Scheldt and Scheldt estuary) since 1975 provide an excellent opportunity to test whether this is the case in the Dutch coastal zone. The time-series were analysed using Multi-Resolution Analysis (MRA) which resulted in the identification of system-dependent patterns on both seasonal and intra-annual time scales. The observed rates of pH change greatly exceed those expected from enhanced CO2 uptake, thus suggesting that other biogeochemical processes, possibly related to changes in nutrient loading, can play a dominant role in ocean acidification.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Waska, Hannelore; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen; Massmann, Gudrun; Koschinsky, Andrea; Schnetger, Bernhard; Simon, Heike; Dittmar, Thorsten;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    Data from pore water (subterranean estuary) and seawater from Spiekeroog south (near ICBM time series station and campsite, 53°45'13.5"N 7°40'22.5"E) and west beach ("Sturmeck", 53°46'10.0"N 7°40'26.2"E). South beach data were collected in August 2012, and west beach data were collected in November 2012. Sample abbreviations: SB=South Beach, WB=West Beach. DUNE=most landward station near dunes, MIX=mid-way station between dune base and low water line, LTWL=low tide water line. Pore water (DUNE, MIX, LTWL) sample collection was conducted at different sediment depths (50, 100, 150 cm below sediment surface). Stainless steel push-point lancets were insetred into the sediment, and pore water was withdrawn via vacuum (hand pumps) into nalgene polycarbonate bottles. Filtration was done using inline PES cartridge filters. The vacuum bottles were argon gas-flushed to avoid oxygen contamination. Sea water (SW) was collected with polycarbonate bottles and from LDPE seepage meter bags (SP) and filtered upon return to the laboratory (same day, PES filter cartridges). Sample collection was trace organic and metal clean (soaking and rinsing of bottles, tubing, and filters with diluted HNO3 and HCl suprapur), with sample materials consisting of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polycarbonate. Solid-phase extraction was done with BOND Elut PPL cartridges and elution with Methanol Optima grade. Measurements were done with VA Computrace 757 (Cu ligand concentrations and stability constants), HR-ICP-MS (Cu, Fe, and Mn concentrations), FT-ICR-MS (DOM), spectrophotometry (nutrients), and TOC analyzer (DOC and TDN). Trace metal concentrations (Fe, Cu, Mn) and speciation (oxidation state, size fractions, and organic association), as well as nitrogen species and concentrations: "Spiekeroog beach subterranean estuary environmental data". Concentrations (µM or nM) are denoted in the headers. CuL1=Cu-binding ligands concentrations (nM), logK1=Cu-binding ligand stability constant. Molecular composition of dissolved organic matter and associated Fe and Cu: "Spiekeroog beach STE_ESI_x_Crosstab_x". pos & neg = positive and negative ionization mode. BSA & NWA = basic/strong acidic and neutral/weak acidic, refer to the extracted DOM fraction. Processed figures and tables based on the original data are published here: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2019.06.004

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tessin, Allyson; März, Christian; Kędra, Monika; Matthiessen, Jens; Morata, Nathalie; Nairn, Michael; O'Regan, Matthew; Peeken, Ilka;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | PaNDA (709175)

    The Arctic Ocean region is currently undergoing dramatic changes, which will likely alter the nutrient cycles that underpin Arctic marine ecosystems. Phosphate is a key limiting nutrient for marine life but gaps in our understanding of the Arctic phosphorus (P) cycle persist. In this study, we investigate the benthic burial and recycling of phosphorus using sediments and pore waters from the Eurasian Arctic margin, including the Barents Sea slope and the Yermak Plateau. Our results highlight that P is generally lost from sediments with depth during organic matter respiration. On the Yermak Plateau, remobilization of P results in a diffusive flux of P to the seafloor of between 96 and 261 μmol m−2 yr−1. On the Barents Sea slope, diffusive fluxes of P are much larger (1736–2449 μmol m−2 yr−1), but these fluxes are into near-surface sediments rather than to the bottom waters. The difference in cycling on the Barents Sea slope is controlled by higher fluxes of fresh organic matter and active iron cycling. As changes in primary productivity, ocean circulation and glacial melt continue, benthic P cycling is likely to be altered with implications for P imported into the Arctic Ocean Basin.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Robinson, Tiera-Brandy; Stolle, Christian; Wurl, Oliver;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    Biochemical data from 3 different regions; Cape Verde, the Baltic Sea, and Norwegian fjords/Sea. discreet samples for TEP, Chl a, POC, PON and nutrients as well as 2 and 24 hour average data on sea state parameters; temperature, salinity, PAR and wind speed. Vertical profile data for TEP, POC, TCN, small autotrophs and Chl a are also presented for depths of 0-2m, sampled in the Baltic and Norwegian Seas.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Van Audenhaege, Loïc; Broad, Emmeline; Hendry, Katharine R; Huvenne, Veerle A I;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | iAtlantic (818123), EC | ICY-LAB (678371)

    We used a multibeam echosounder (Reson7125) front-mounted onto the ROV Isis (Dive D333, DY081 expedition) to map the terrain of a vertical feature marking the edge of a deep-sea glacial trough (Labrador Sea, [63°51.9'N, 53°16.9'W, depth: 650 to 800 m]). After correction of the ROV navigation (i.e. merging of USBL and DVL), bathymetry [m] and backscatter [nominal unit] were extracted at a resolution of 0.3 m and different terrain descriptors were computed: Slope, Bathymetric Position Index (BPI), Terrain Ruggedness Index, Roughness, Mean and Gaussian curvatures and orientations (Northness and Eastness), at scales of 0.9, 3 and 9 m. Using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA), the terrain descriptors enabled to retrieve 4 terrain clusters and their associated confusion index, to investigate the spatial heterogeneity of the terrain. This approach also underlined the presence of geomorphic features in the wall terrain. The extraction of the backscatter intensity for the first time considering vertical terrains, opens space for further acquisition and processing development. Using photographs collected by the ROV Isis (Dive D334, DY081 expedition), epibenthic fauna was annotated. Each image was linked to a terrain cluster in the 3D space and pooled into 20-m² bins of images. A Bray-Curtis dissimilarity matrix was constructed from morphospecies abundances. This enabled to test for differences of assemblage composition among clusters. Few species appeared more abundant in particular clusters such as L. pertusa in high-roughness cluster. However, nMDS suggested differences in assemblage composition but these dissimilarities were not strongly delineated. Whereas the design of this study may have limited distinctive differences among assemblages, this shows the potential of this cost-effective method of top-down habitat mapping to be applied in undersampled benthic habitat in order to provide a priori knwoledge for defining appropriate sampling design.