Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to European Marine Science. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
124 Research products, page 1 of 13

  • European Marine Science
  • Other research products
  • European Commission
  • DE
  • RO
  • UA

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Steinacher, M.; Joos, F.; Frölicher, T. L.; Bopp, L.; Cadule, P.; Cocco, V.; Doney, S. C.; Gehlen, M.; Lindsay, K.; Moore, J. K.; +2 more
    Project: EC | EPOCA (211384), EC | MEECE (212085)

    Changes in marine net primary productivity (PP) and export of particulate organic carbon (EP) are projected over the 21st century with four global coupled carbon cycle-climate models. These include representations of marine ecosystems and the carbon cycle of different structure and complexity. All four models show a decrease in global mean PP and EP between 2 and 20% by 2100 relative to preindustrial conditions, for the SRES A2 emission scenario. Two different regimes for productivity changes are consistently identified in all models. The first chain of mechanisms is dominant in the low- and mid-latitude ocean and in the North Atlantic: reduced input of macro-nutrients into the euphotic zone related to enhanced stratification, reduced mixed layer depth, and slowed circulation causes a decrease in macro-nutrient concentrations and in PP and EP. The second regime is projected for parts of the Southern Ocean: an alleviation of light and/or temperature limitation leads to an increase in PP and EP as productivity is fueled by a sustained nutrient input. A region of disagreement among the models is the Arctic, where three models project an increase in PP while one model projects a decrease. Projected changes in seasonal and interannual variability are modest in most regions. Regional model skill metrics are proposed to generate multi-model mean fields that show an improved skill in representing observation-based estimates compared to a simple multi-model average. Model results are compared to recent productivity projections with three different algorithms, usually applied to infer net primary production from satellite observations.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Hoppe, C. J. M.; Langer, G.; Rokitta, S. D.; Wolf-Gladrow, D. A.; Rost, B.;
    Project: EC | NEWLOG (267931), EC | PHYTOCHANGE (205150), EC | MEDSEA (265103), EC | MOLSPINQIP (211284)

    The growing field of ocean acidification research is concerned with the investigation of organism responses to increasing pCO2 values. One important approach in this context is culture work using seawater with adjusted CO2 levels. As aqueous pCO2 is difficult to measure directly in small-scale experiments, it is generally calculated from two other measured parameters of the carbonate system (often AT, CT or pH). Unfortunately, the overall uncertainties of measured and subsequently calculated values are often unknown. Especially under high pCO2, this can become a severe problem with respect to the interpretation of physiological and ecological data. In the few datasets from ocean acidification research where all three of these parameters were measured, pCO2 values calculated from AT and CT are typically about 30% lower (i.e. ~300 μatm at a target pCO2 of 1000 μatm) than those calculated from AT and pH or CT and pH. This study presents and discusses these discrepancies as well as likely consequences for the ocean acidification community. Until this problem is solved, one has to consider that calculated parameters of the carbonate system (e.g. pCO2, calcite saturation state) may not be comparable between studies, and that this may have important implications for the interpretation of CO2 perturbation experiments.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2013
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Neuber, Roland; Baelum, Karoline; Roenneberg, Ragnhild; Olseng, Christine Daae; Oerbaek, Jon-Boerre; Hansen, Georg;
    Publisher: CNR-DTA
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | SIOS-PP (261747)

    Towards a SIOS observational integration plan Roland Neuber1, Karoline Baelum2, Ragnhild Rønneberg3, Christine Daae Olseng4, Jon Børre Ørbæk4, Georg Hansen5 1. Alfred-Wegener-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum for Polar and Marine Research 2. Svalbard Science Forum 3. UNIS 4. Research Council of Norway 5. NILU The existing and planned observational capacities of SIOS members on Svalbard are divers and distributed with respect to locations, scientific disciplines, physical spheres, institutional structures, and other aspects. Accordingly, a great need of integration arises, which on one hand needs to take into account the specifics of a large range of scientific disciplines, of polar research, international cooperation beyond Europe, and more. On the other hand, integrating the observational capacities opens up a huge potential of novel research and knowledge –and especially if satellite data are included more in the work. Within SIOS the scientific observations should be coordinated with the goal to produce “added values” by making infrastructure available across disciplines, locations and institutions.. For the Kongsfjorden International Research Base in Ny-Ålesund four flagship programmes have been developed recently by NySMAC and SSF. Each programme identifies also here needs for observational integration. Observational integration within SIOS can be fundamentally discriminated for the two areas of scientific work, namely Field expeditions (on land or on sea but outside of established stations and permanent installations), and Long term observations. For long term observations SIOS should utilize already existing structures and affiliate with them. This includes particularly established observational networks which we find in fields like meteorology, oceanography, geophysics and others, as well as in organisational structures like SAON/ISAC, INTERACT/SCANNET, AMAP and others. For Ny-Ålesund the previously established Flagship Programmes could be further developed to become an integral part of SIOS. Observational coordination could be organized according to • Disciplines or compartments, like “atmosphere”, “ocean”, “cryosphere”, “terrestrial systems” • Platforms, like “land based”, “sea borne”, “air borne”, “space borne” • Location, like Ny-Ålesund, Longyearbyen, Barentsburg, Hornsund, Hopen/ Bjørnøya, others • Scientific Topics The Ny-Ålesund scientific community is invited to contribute substantially to the further development of the SIOS observational integration plan, which should become effective after the formal establishment of SIOS, planned autumn 2014.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Crise, Alessandro; Ribera d’Alcalà, Maurizio; Mariani, Patrizio; Petihakis, George; Robidart, Julie; Iudicone, Daniele; Bachmayer, Ralf; Malfatti, Francesca;
    Project: UKRI | Development and applicati... (NE/N006496/1), EC | JERICO-NEXT (654410), EC | EMSO-Link (731036), EC | AtlantOS (633211)

    In the field of ocean observing, the term of “observatory” is often used without a unique meaning. A clear and unified definition of observatory is needed in order to facilitate the communication in a multidisciplinary community, to capitalize on future technological innovations and to support the observatory design based on societal needs. In this paper, we present a general framework to define the next generation Marine OBservatory (MOB), its capabilities and functionalities in an operational context. The MOB consists of four interconnected components or “gears” (observation infrastructure, cyberinfrastructure, support capacity, and knowledge generation engine) that are constantly and adaptively interacting with each other. Therefore, a MOB is a complex infrastructure focused on a specific geographic area with the primary scope to generate knowledge via data synthesis and thereby addressing scientific, societal, or economic challenges. Long-term sustainability is a key MOB feature that should be guaranteed through an appropriate governance. MOBs should be open to innovations and good practices to reduce operational costs and to allow their development in quality and quantity. A deeper biological understanding of the marine ecosystem should be reached with the proliferation of MOBs, thus contributing to effective conservation of ecosystems and management of human activities in the oceans. We provide an actionable model for the upgrade and development of sustained marine observatories producing knowledge to support science-based economic and societal decisions. Refereed 14.A Manual (incl. handbook, guide, cookbook etc) 2018-09-07

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rehfeld, K.; Molkenthin, N.; Kurths, J.;
    Project: EC | LINC (289447)

    A critical challenge in paleoclimate data analysis is the fact that the proxy data are heterogeneously distributed in space, which affects statistical methods that rely on spatial embedding of data. In the paleoclimate network approach nodes represent paleoclimate proxy time series, and links in the network are given by statistically significant similarities between them. Their location in space, proxy and archive type is coded in the node attributes. We develop a semi-empirical model for Spatio-Temporally AutocoRrelated Time series, inspired by the interplay of different Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) systems. We use an ensemble of transition runs of this START model to test whether and how spatio–temporal climate transitions could be detectable from (paleo)climate networks. We sample model time series both on a grid and at locations at which paleoclimate data are available to investigate the effect of the spatially heterogeneous availability of data. Node betweenness centrality, averaged over the transition region, does not respond to the transition displayed by the START model, neither in the grid-based nor in the scattered sampling arrangement. The regionally defined measures of regional node degree and cross link ratio, however, are indicative of the changes in both scenarios, although the magnitude of the changes differs according to the sampling. We find that the START model is particularly suitable for pseudo-proxy experiments to test the technical reconstruction limits of paleoclimate data based on their location, and we conclude that (paleo)climate networks are suitable for investigating spatio–temporal transitions in the dependence structure of underlying climatic fields.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Grand, Maxime M.; Clinton-Bailey, Geraldine S.; Beaton, Alexander D.; Schaap, Allison M.; Johengen, Thomas H.; Tamburri, Mario N.; Connelly, Douglas P.; Mowlem, Matthew C.; Achterberg, Eric P.;
    Project: EC | SENSEOCEAN (614141)

    The development of phosphate sensors suitable for long-term in situ deployments in natural waters, is essential to improve our understanding of the distribution, fluxes, and biogeochemical role of this key nutrient in a changing ocean. Here, we describe the optimization of the molybdenum blue method for in situ work using a lab-on-chip (LOC) analyzer and evaluate its performance in the laboratory and at two contrasting field sites. The in situ performance of the LOC sensor is evaluated using hourly time-series data from a 56-day trial in Southampton Water (UK), as well as a month-long deployment in the subtropical oligotrophic waters of Kaneohe Bay (Hawaii, USA). In Kaneohe Bay, where phosphate concentrations were characteristic of the dry season (0.13 ± 0.03 μM, n = 704), the in situ sensor accuracy was 16 ± 12% and a potential diurnal cycle in phosphate concentrations was observed. In Southampton Water, the sensor data (1.02 ± 0.40 μM, n = 1,267) were accurate to ±0.10 μM relative to discrete reference samples. Hourly in situ monitoring revealed striking tidal and storm derived fluctuations in phosphate concentrations in Southampton Water that would not have been captured via discrete sampling. We show the impact of storms on phosphate concentrations in Southampton Water is modulated by the spring-neap tidal cycle and that the 10-fold decline in phosphate concentrations observed during the later stages of the deployment was consistent with the timing of a spring phytoplankton bloom in the English Channel. Under controlled laboratory conditions in a 250 L tank, the sensor demonstrated an accuracy and precision better than 10% irrespective of the salinity (0–30), turbidity (0–100 NTU), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) concentration (0–10mg/L), and temperature (5–20◦C) of the water (0.3–13 μM phosphate) being analyzed. This work demonstrates that the LOC technology is mature enough to quantify the influence of stochastic events on nutrient budgets and to elucidate the role of phosphate in regulating phytoplankton productivity and community composition in estuarine and coastal regimes. Refereed 14.A Nutrients TRL 8 Actual system completed and "mission qualified" through test and demonstration in an operational environment (ground or space) Manual (incl. handbook, guide, cookbook etc) Standard Operating Procedure

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yi, S.; Wischnewski, K.; Langer, M.; Muster, S.; Boike, J.;
    Project: EC | PAGE21 (282700)

    Freeze/thaw (F/T) processes can be quite different under the various land surface types found in the complex tundra of the Arctic, such as polygonal tundra (wet center and dry rims), ponds, and thermokarst lakes. Proper simulation of these different processes is essential for accurate prediction of the release of greenhouse gases under a warming climate scenario. In this study we have incorporated the water layer into a dynamic organic soil version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (DOS-TEM), having first verified and validated the model. Results showed that (1) the DOS-TEM was very efficient and its results compared well with analytical solutions for idealized cases, and (2) despite a number of limitations and uncertainties in the modeling, the simulations compared reasonably well with in situ measurements from polygon rims, polygon centers (with and without water), and lakes on Samoylov Island, Siberia, indicating the suitability of the DOS-TEM for simulating the various F/T processes. Sensitivity tests were performed on the effects of water depth and our results indicated that both water and snow cover are very important in the simulated thermal processes, for both polygon centers and lakes. We therefore concluded that the polygon rims and polygon centers (with various maximum water depths) should be considered separately, and that the dynamics of water depth in both polygons and lakes should be taken into account when simulating thermal processes for methane emission studies.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Waelbroeck, Claire; Pichat, Sylvain; Böhm, Evelyn; Lougheed, Bryan C.; Faranda, Davide; Vrac, Mathieu; Missiaen, Lise; Vazquez Riveiros, Natalia; Burckel, Pierre; Lippold, Jörg; +4 more
    Project: ANR | RETRO (ANR-09-BLAN-0347), EC | ACCLIMATE (339108)

    Thanks to its optimal location on the northern Brazilian margin, core MD09-3257 records both ocean circulation and atmospheric changes. The latter occur locally in the form of increased rainfall on the adjacent continent during the cold intervals recorded in Greenland ice and northern North Atlantic sediment cores (i.e., Greenland stadials). These rainfall events are recorded in MD09-3257 as peaks in ln(Ti ∕ Ca). New sedimentary Pa ∕ Th data indicate that mid-depth western equatorial water mass transport decreased during all of the Greenland stadials of the last 40 kyr. Using cross-wavelet transforms and spectrogram analysis, we assess the relative phase between the MD09-3257 sedimentary Pa ∕ Th and ln(Ti ∕ Ca) signals. We show that decreased water mass transport between a depth of ∼1300 and 2300 m in the western equatorial Atlantic preceded increased rainfall over the adjacent continent by 120 to 400 yr at Dansgaard–Oeschger (D–O) frequencies, and by 280 to 980 yr at Heinrich-like frequencies. We suggest that the large lead of ocean circulation changes with respect to changes in tropical South American precipitation at Heinrich-like frequencies is related to the effect of a positive feedback involving iceberg discharges in the North Atlantic. In contrast, the absence of widespread ice rafted detrital layers in North Atlantic cores during D–O stadials supports the hypothesis that a feedback such as this was not triggered in the case of D–O stadials, with circulation slowdowns and subsequent changes remaining more limited during D–O stadials than Heinrich stadials.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2013
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Burgemeister, Sonja; Ritter, Christoph; Maturilli, Marion; Neuber, Roland; Schulz, Alexander;
    Publisher: CNR-DTA
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | SIOS-PP (261747)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gao, K.;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | EPOCA (211384)
Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to European Marine Science. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
124 Research products, page 1 of 13
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Steinacher, M.; Joos, F.; Frölicher, T. L.; Bopp, L.; Cadule, P.; Cocco, V.; Doney, S. C.; Gehlen, M.; Lindsay, K.; Moore, J. K.; +2 more
    Project: EC | EPOCA (211384), EC | MEECE (212085)

    Changes in marine net primary productivity (PP) and export of particulate organic carbon (EP) are projected over the 21st century with four global coupled carbon cycle-climate models. These include representations of marine ecosystems and the carbon cycle of different structure and complexity. All four models show a decrease in global mean PP and EP between 2 and 20% by 2100 relative to preindustrial conditions, for the SRES A2 emission scenario. Two different regimes for productivity changes are consistently identified in all models. The first chain of mechanisms is dominant in the low- and mid-latitude ocean and in the North Atlantic: reduced input of macro-nutrients into the euphotic zone related to enhanced stratification, reduced mixed layer depth, and slowed circulation causes a decrease in macro-nutrient concentrations and in PP and EP. The second regime is projected for parts of the Southern Ocean: an alleviation of light and/or temperature limitation leads to an increase in PP and EP as productivity is fueled by a sustained nutrient input. A region of disagreement among the models is the Arctic, where three models project an increase in PP while one model projects a decrease. Projected changes in seasonal and interannual variability are modest in most regions. Regional model skill metrics are proposed to generate multi-model mean fields that show an improved skill in representing observation-based estimates compared to a simple multi-model average. Model results are compared to recent productivity projections with three different algorithms, usually applied to infer net primary production from satellite observations.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Hoppe, C. J. M.; Langer, G.; Rokitta, S. D.; Wolf-Gladrow, D. A.; Rost, B.;
    Project: EC | NEWLOG (267931), EC | PHYTOCHANGE (205150), EC | MEDSEA (265103), EC | MOLSPINQIP (211284)

    The growing field of ocean acidification research is concerned with the investigation of organism responses to increasing pCO2 values. One important approach in this context is culture work using seawater with adjusted CO2 levels. As aqueous pCO2 is difficult to measure directly in small-scale experiments, it is generally calculated from two other measured parameters of the carbonate system (often AT, CT or pH). Unfortunately, the overall uncertainties of measured and subsequently calculated values are often unknown. Especially under high pCO2, this can become a severe problem with respect to the interpretation of physiological and ecological data. In the few datasets from ocean acidification research where all three of these parameters were measured, pCO2 values calculated from AT and CT are typically about 30% lower (i.e. ~300 μatm at a target pCO2 of 1000 μatm) than those calculated from AT and pH or CT and pH. This study presents and discusses these discrepancies as well as likely consequences for the ocean acidification community. Until this problem is solved, one has to consider that calculated parameters of the carbonate system (e.g. pCO2, calcite saturation state) may not be comparable between studies, and that this may have important implications for the interpretation of CO2 perturbation experiments.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2013
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Neuber, Roland; Baelum, Karoline; Roenneberg, Ragnhild; Olseng, Christine Daae; Oerbaek, Jon-Boerre; Hansen, Georg;
    Publisher: CNR-DTA
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | SIOS-PP (261747)

    Towards a SIOS observational integration plan Roland Neuber1, Karoline Baelum2, Ragnhild Rønneberg3, Christine Daae Olseng4, Jon Børre Ørbæk4, Georg Hansen5 1. Alfred-Wegener-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum for Polar and Marine Research 2. Svalbard Science Forum 3. UNIS 4. Research Council of Norway 5. NILU The existing and planned observational capacities of SIOS members on Svalbard are divers and distributed with respect to locations, scientific disciplines, physical spheres, institutional structures, and other aspects. Accordingly, a great need of integration arises, which on one hand needs to take into account the specifics of a large range of scientific disciplines, of polar research, international cooperation beyond Europe, and more. On the other hand, integrating the observational capacities opens up a huge potential of novel research and knowledge –and especially if satellite data are included more in the work. Within SIOS the scientific observations should be coordinated with the goal to produce “added values” by making infrastructure available across disciplines, locations and institutions.. For the Kongsfjorden International Research Base in Ny-Ålesund four flagship programmes have been developed recently by NySMAC and SSF. Each programme identifies also here needs for observational integration. Observational integration within SIOS can be fundamentally discriminated for the two areas of scientific work, namely Field expeditions (on land or on sea but outside of established stations and permanent installations), and Long term observations. For long term observations SIOS should utilize already existing structures and affiliate with them. This includes particularly established observational networks which we find in fields like meteorology, oceanography, geophysics and others, as well as in organisational structures like SAON/ISAC, INTERACT/SCANNET, AMAP and others. For Ny-Ålesund the previously established Flagship Programmes could be further developed to become an integral part of SIOS. Observational coordination could be organized according to • Disciplines or compartments, like “atmosphere”, “ocean”, “cryosphere”, “terrestrial systems” • Platforms, like “land based”, “sea borne”, “air borne”, “space borne” • Location, like Ny-Ålesund, Longyearbyen, Barentsburg, Hornsund, Hopen/ Bjørnøya, others • Scientific Topics The Ny-Ålesund scientific community is invited to contribute substantially to the further development of the SIOS observational integration plan, which should become effective after the formal establishment of SIOS, planned autumn 2014.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Crise, Alessandro; Ribera d’Alcalà, Maurizio; Mariani, Patrizio; Petihakis, George; Robidart, Julie; Iudicone, Daniele; Bachmayer, Ralf; Malfatti, Francesca;
    Project: UKRI | Development and applicati... (NE/N006496/1), EC | JERICO-NEXT (654410), EC | EMSO-Link (731036), EC | AtlantOS (633211)

    In the field of ocean observing, the term of “observatory” is often used without a unique meaning. A clear and unified definition of observatory is needed in order to facilitate the communication in a multidisciplinary community, to capitalize on future technological innovations and to support the observatory design based on societal needs. In this paper, we present a general framework to define the next generation Marine OBservatory (MOB), its capabilities and functionalities in an operational context. The MOB consists of four interconnected components or “gears” (observation infrastructure, cyberinfrastructure, support capacity, and knowledge generation engine) that are constantly and adaptively interacting with each other. Therefore, a MOB is a complex infrastructure focused on a specific geographic area with the primary scope to generate knowledge via data synthesis and thereby addressing scientific, societal, or economic challenges. Long-term sustainability is a key MOB feature that should be guaranteed through an appropriate governance. MOBs should be open to innovations and good practices to reduce operational costs and to allow their development in quality and quantity. A deeper biological understanding of the marine ecosystem should be reached with the proliferation of MOBs, thus contributing to effective conservation of ecosystems and management of human activities in the oceans. We provide an actionable model for the upgrade and development of sustained marine observatories producing knowledge to support science-based economic and societal decisions. Refereed 14.A Manual (incl. handbook, guide, cookbook etc) 2018-09-07

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rehfeld, K.; Molkenthin, N.; Kurths, J.;
    Project: EC | LINC (289447)

    A critical challenge in paleoclimate data analysis is the fact that the proxy data are heterogeneously distributed in space, which affects statistical methods that rely on spatial embedding of data. In the paleoclimate network approach nodes represent paleoclimate proxy time series, and links in the network are given by statistically significant similarities between them. Their location in space, proxy and archive type is coded in the node attributes. We develop a semi-empirical model for Spatio-Temporally AutocoRrelated Time series, inspired by the interplay of different Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) systems. We use an ensemble of transition runs of this START model to test whether and how spatio–temporal climate transitions could be detectable from (paleo)climate networks. We sample model time series both on a grid and at locations at which paleoclimate data are available to investigate the effect of the spatially heterogeneous availability of data. Node betweenness centrality, averaged over the transition region, does not respond to the transition displayed by the START model, neither in the grid-based nor in the scattered sampling arrangement. The regionally defined measures of regional node degree and cross link ratio, however, are indicative of the changes in both scenarios, although the magnitude of the changes differs according to the sampling. We find that the START model is particularly suitable for pseudo-proxy experiments to test the technical reconstruction limits of paleoclimate data based on their location, and we conclude that (paleo)climate networks are suitable for investigating spatio–temporal transitions in the dependence structure of underlying climatic fields.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Grand, Maxime M.; Clinton-Bailey, Geraldine S.; Beaton, Alexander D.; Schaap, Allison M.; Johengen, Thomas H.; Tamburri, Mario N.; Connelly, Douglas P.; Mowlem, Matthew C.; Achterberg, Eric P.;
    Project: EC | SENSEOCEAN (614141)

    The development of phosphate sensors suitable for long-term in situ deployments in natural waters, is essential to improve our understanding of the distribution, fluxes, and biogeochemical role of this key nutrient in a changing ocean. Here, we describe the optimization of the molybdenum blue method for in situ work using a lab-on-chip (LOC) analyzer and evaluate its performance in the laboratory and at two contrasting field sites. The in situ performance of the LOC sensor is evaluated using hourly time-series data from a 56-day trial in Southampton Water (UK), as well as a month-long deployment in the subtropical oligotrophic waters of Kaneohe Bay (Hawaii, USA). In Kaneohe Bay, where phosphate concentrations were characteristic of the dry season (0.13 ± 0.03 μM, n = 704), the in situ sensor accuracy was 16 ± 12% and a potential diurnal cycle in phosphate concentrations was observed. In Southampton Water, the sensor data (1.02 ± 0.40 μM, n = 1,267) were accurate to ±0.10 μM relative to discrete reference samples. Hourly in situ monitoring revealed striking tidal and storm derived fluctuations in phosphate concentrations in Southampton Water that would not have been captured via discrete sampling. We show the impact of storms on phosphate concentrations in Southampton Water is modulated by the spring-neap tidal cycle and that the 10-fold decline in phosphate concentrations observed during the later stages of the deployment was consistent with the timing of a spring phytoplankton bloom in the English Channel. Under controlled laboratory conditions in a 250 L tank, the sensor demonstrated an accuracy and precision better than 10% irrespective of the salinity (0–30), turbidity (0–100 NTU), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) concentration (0–10mg/L), and temperature (5–20◦C) of the water (0.3–13 μM phosphate) being analyzed. This work demonstrates that the LOC technology is mature enough to quantify the influence of stochastic events on nutrient budgets and to elucidate the role of phosphate in regulating phytoplankton productivity and community composition in estuarine and coastal regimes. Refereed 14.A Nutrients TRL 8 Actual system completed and "mission qualified" through test and demonstration in an operational environment (ground or space) Manual (incl. handbook, guide, cookbook etc) Standard Operating Procedure

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yi, S.; Wischnewski, K.; Langer, M.; Muster, S.; Boike, J.;
    Project: EC | PAGE21 (282700)

    Freeze/thaw (F/T) processes can be quite different under the various land surface types found in the complex tundra of the Arctic, such as polygonal tundra (wet center and dry rims), ponds, and thermokarst lakes. Proper simulation of these different processes is essential for accurate prediction of the release of greenhouse gases under a warming climate scenario. In this study we have incorporated the water layer into a dynamic organic soil version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (DOS-TEM), having first verified and validated the model. Results showed that (1) the DOS-TEM was very efficient and its results compared well with analytical solutions for idealized cases, and (2) despite a number of limitations and uncertainties in the modeling, the simulations compared reasonably well with in situ measurements from polygon rims, polygon centers (with and without water), and lakes on Samoylov Island, Siberia, indicating the suitability of the DOS-TEM for simulating the various F/T processes. Sensitivity tests were performed on the effects of water depth and our results indicated that both water and snow cover are very important in the simulated thermal processes, for both polygon centers and lakes. We therefore concluded that the polygon rims and polygon centers (with various maximum water depths) should be considered separately, and that the dynamics of water depth in both polygons and lakes should be taken into account when simulating thermal processes for methane emission studies.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Waelbroeck, Claire; Pichat, Sylvain; Böhm, Evelyn; Lougheed, Bryan C.; Faranda, Davide; Vrac, Mathieu; Missiaen, Lise; Vazquez Riveiros, Natalia; Burckel, Pierre; Lippold, Jörg; +4 more
    Project: ANR | RETRO (ANR-09-BLAN-0347), EC | ACCLIMATE (339108)

    Thanks to its optimal location on the northern Brazilian margin, core MD09-3257 records both ocean circulation and atmospheric changes. The latter occur locally in the form of increased rainfall on the adjacent continent during the cold intervals recorded in Greenland ice and northern North Atlantic sediment cores (i.e., Greenland stadials). These rainfall events are recorded in MD09-3257 as peaks in ln(Ti ∕ Ca). New sedimentary Pa ∕ Th data indicate that mid-depth western equatorial water mass transport decreased during all of the Greenland stadials of the last 40 kyr. Using cross-wavelet transforms and spectrogram analysis, we assess the relative phase between the MD09-3257 sedimentary Pa ∕ Th and ln(Ti ∕ Ca) signals. We show that decreased water mass transport between a depth of ∼1300 and 2300 m in the western equatorial Atlantic preceded increased rainfall over the adjacent continent by 120 to 400 yr at Dansgaard–Oeschger (D–O) frequencies, and by 280 to 980 yr at Heinrich-like frequencies. We suggest that the large lead of ocean circulation changes with respect to changes in tropical South American precipitation at Heinrich-like frequencies is related to the effect of a positive feedback involving iceberg discharges in the North Atlantic. In contrast, the absence of widespread ice rafted detrital layers in North Atlantic cores during D–O stadials supports the hypothesis that a feedback such as this was not triggered in the case of D–O stadials, with circulation slowdowns and subsequent changes remaining more limited during D–O stadials than Heinrich stadials.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2013
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Burgemeister, Sonja; Ritter, Christoph; Maturilli, Marion; Neuber, Roland; Schulz, Alexander;
    Publisher: CNR-DTA
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | SIOS-PP (261747)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gao, K.;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | EPOCA (211384)