Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to European Marine Science. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
12,303 Research products, page 1 of 1,231

  • European Marine Science
  • Other research products
  • Open Access

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gutt, Julian;
    Publisher: Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    World Bank;
    Publisher: Washington, DC
    Country: United States

    The objective of the Functional Review of the Environment, Water and Forestry sector (FR-EWF) is to help the Government of Romania (GoR) develop an action plan for implementation over the short- and medium-term to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of the sector administration, and provide input to the Government National Reform Program (NRP 2011- 2013) and beyond, especially in relation to those functions that support Romania's implementation of key EU directives, help speed up convergence with the environmental Acquis, remove constraints to EU structural funds absorption, and manage the country's natural assets sustainably. The report is presented in two volumes, with the first volume providing an integrated view of the sector as currently configured around environmental management, water, and forestry, and the second volume dedicated to a detailed review of the forestry sector. Volume 1 is organized as follows: Part I provides an overall introduction, objectives and context of the review; Part II summarizes the key challenges facing the sector, focusing on the three main sub-sectors, environmental management, water, and forestry; Part III reviews the strategic framework of the sector, pointing out areas where improvements will be needed; Part IV reviews the configuration of the sector, its organization and performance; Part V assesses the salient cross-cutting issues; and Part VI presents the key recommendations. Volume 2, dedicated to the forestry sub-sector, is organized along the four assessment areas.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Shaviklo, A.; Mozafari, H.; Motamedzadegan, A.; Damavandi-Kamali, N.;

    Tuna processing by-product is estimated at more than 100,000 metric tonnes annually in Iran, which could be a potential source of edible protein in human food. Hence, recovering proteins from tuna by-products is a big achievement in the seafood industry. In this work tuna protein isolates (TPI) were extracted from dark/ red meat using the isoelectric solubilization/ precipitation method. Oxidative stability, biochemical indices and characteristics of the fatty acid composition of TPI (pH 6.5) containing 16.2% protein, 1.2% fat and mixed with a blend of salt and sucrose – as a cryostabilizer - and stored 6 months at -24°C were studied. The levels of peroxide (PV), TBARS, FFA and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) were significantly increased in TPI without cryostabilizers during the storage time. The results revealed that 22 fatty acids were identified in the light and dark tuna meat and TPI. The fatty acid composition of light and dark muscle of tuna and TPI containing salt and sucrose was the same. However a significant change was observed only in the TPI free from cryostabilizers during frozen storage. The results confirm inhibiting of lipid oxidation due to the incorporation of salt and sucrose to TPI. Published

  • Other research product . 2001
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Vogelsang, E.; Sarnthein, M.;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access
    Publisher: Alfred-Wegener-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Barrett, P.;
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Knust, Rainer;
    Publisher: Alfred Wegener Institute
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sieger, Rainer;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Rohardt, Gerd;
    Publisher: Alfred Wegener Institute
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hassenrück, Christiane; Tegetmeyer, Halina; Ramette, Alban; Fabricius, Katharina Elisabeth;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | ABYSS (294757)

    Bacterial biofilms provide cues for the settlement of marine invertebrates such as coral larvae, and are therefore important for the resilience and recovery of coral reefs. This study aimed to better understand how ocean acidification may affect the community composition and diversity of bacterial biofilms on surfaces under naturally reduced pH conditions. Settlement tiles were deployed at coral reefs in Papua New Guinea along pH gradients created by two CO2 seeps, and upper and lower tiles surfaces were sampled 5 and 13 months after deployment. Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis were used to characterize more than 200 separate bacterial communities, complemented by amplicon sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene of 16 samples. The bacterial biofilm consisted predominantly of Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria, as well as Cyanobacteria, Flavobacteriia and Cytophaga, whereas putative settlement-inducing taxa only accounted for a small fraction of the community. Bacterial biofilm composition was heterogeneous with approximately 25% shared operational taxonomic units between samples. Among the observed environmental parameters, pH only had a weak effect on community composition (R² ~ 1%) and did not affect community richness and evenness. In contrast, there were strong differences between upper and lower surfaces (contrasting in light exposure and grazing intensity). There also appeared to be a strong interaction between bacterial biofilm composition and the macroscopic components of the tile community. Our results suggest that on mature settlement surfaces in situ, pH does not have a strong impact on the composition of bacterial biofilms. Other abiotic and biotic factors such as light exposure and interactions with other organisms may be more important in shaping bacterial biofilms than changes in seawater pH.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to European Marine Science. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
12,303 Research products, page 1 of 1,231
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gutt, Julian;
    Publisher: Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    World Bank;
    Publisher: Washington, DC
    Country: United States

    The objective of the Functional Review of the Environment, Water and Forestry sector (FR-EWF) is to help the Government of Romania (GoR) develop an action plan for implementation over the short- and medium-term to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of the sector administration, and provide input to the Government National Reform Program (NRP 2011- 2013) and beyond, especially in relation to those functions that support Romania's implementation of key EU directives, help speed up convergence with the environmental Acquis, remove constraints to EU structural funds absorption, and manage the country's natural assets sustainably. The report is presented in two volumes, with the first volume providing an integrated view of the sector as currently configured around environmental management, water, and forestry, and the second volume dedicated to a detailed review of the forestry sector. Volume 1 is organized as follows: Part I provides an overall introduction, objectives and context of the review; Part II summarizes the key challenges facing the sector, focusing on the three main sub-sectors, environmental management, water, and forestry; Part III reviews the strategic framework of the sector, pointing out areas where improvements will be needed; Part IV reviews the configuration of the sector, its organization and performance; Part V assesses the salient cross-cutting issues; and Part VI presents the key recommendations. Volume 2, dedicated to the forestry sub-sector, is organized along the four assessment areas.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Shaviklo, A.; Mozafari, H.; Motamedzadegan, A.; Damavandi-Kamali, N.;

    Tuna processing by-product is estimated at more than 100,000 metric tonnes annually in Iran, which could be a potential source of edible protein in human food. Hence, recovering proteins from tuna by-products is a big achievement in the seafood industry. In this work tuna protein isolates (TPI) were extracted from dark/ red meat using the isoelectric solubilization/ precipitation method. Oxidative stability, biochemical indices and characteristics of the fatty acid composition of TPI (pH 6.5) containing 16.2% protein, 1.2% fat and mixed with a blend of salt and sucrose – as a cryostabilizer - and stored 6 months at -24°C were studied. The levels of peroxide (PV), TBARS, FFA and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) were significantly increased in TPI without cryostabilizers during the storage time. The results revealed that 22 fatty acids were identified in the light and dark tuna meat and TPI. The fatty acid composition of light and dark muscle of tuna and TPI containing salt and sucrose was the same. However a significant change was observed only in the TPI free from cryostabilizers during frozen storage. The results confirm inhibiting of lipid oxidation due to the incorporation of salt and sucrose to TPI. Published

  • Other research product . 2001
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Vogelsang, E.; Sarnthein, M.;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access
    Publisher: Alfred-Wegener-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Barrett, P.;
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Knust, Rainer;
    Publisher: Alfred Wegener Institute
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sieger, Rainer;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Rohardt, Gerd;
    Publisher: Alfred Wegener Institute
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hassenrück, Christiane; Tegetmeyer, Halina; Ramette, Alban; Fabricius, Katharina Elisabeth;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | ABYSS (294757)

    Bacterial biofilms provide cues for the settlement of marine invertebrates such as coral larvae, and are therefore important for the resilience and recovery of coral reefs. This study aimed to better understand how ocean acidification may affect the community composition and diversity of bacterial biofilms on surfaces under naturally reduced pH conditions. Settlement tiles were deployed at coral reefs in Papua New Guinea along pH gradients created by two CO2 seeps, and upper and lower tiles surfaces were sampled 5 and 13 months after deployment. Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis were used to characterize more than 200 separate bacterial communities, complemented by amplicon sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene of 16 samples. The bacterial biofilm consisted predominantly of Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria, as well as Cyanobacteria, Flavobacteriia and Cytophaga, whereas putative settlement-inducing taxa only accounted for a small fraction of the community. Bacterial biofilm composition was heterogeneous with approximately 25% shared operational taxonomic units between samples. Among the observed environmental parameters, pH only had a weak effect on community composition (R² ~ 1%) and did not affect community richness and evenness. In contrast, there were strong differences between upper and lower surfaces (contrasting in light exposure and grazing intensity). There also appeared to be a strong interaction between bacterial biofilm composition and the macroscopic components of the tile community. Our results suggest that on mature settlement surfaces in situ, pH does not have a strong impact on the composition of bacterial biofilms. Other abiotic and biotic factors such as light exposure and interactions with other organisms may be more important in shaping bacterial biofilms than changes in seawater pH.