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3 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • European Marine Science
  • Other research products
  • 2014-2023
  • Biogeosciences (BG)
  • Aurora Universities Network
  • European Marine Science

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dumousseaud, C.; Achterberg, E. P.; Tyrrell, T.; Charalampopoulou, A.; Schuster, U.; Hartman, M.; Hydes, D. J.;
    Project: EC | EPOCA (211384)

    Future climate change as a result of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations is expected to strongly affect the oceans, with shallower winter mixing and consequent reduction in primary production and oceanic carbon drawdown in low and mid-latitudinal oceanic regions. Here we test this hypothesis by examining the effects of cold and warm winters on the carbonate system in the surface waters of the Northeast Atlantic Ocean for the period between 2005 and 2007. Monthly observations were made between the English Channel and the Bay of Biscay using a ship of opportunity program. During the colder winter of 2005/2006, the maximum depth of the mixed layer reached up to 650 m in the Bay of Biscay, whilst during the warmer (by 2.6 ± 0.5 °C) winter of 2006/2007 the mixed layer depth reached only 300 m. The inter-annual differences in late winter concentrations of nitrate (2.8 ± 1.1 μmol l−1) and dissolved inorganic carbon (22 ± 6 μmol kg−1, with higher concentrations at the end of the colder winter (2005/2006), led to differences in the dissolved oxygen anomaly and the chlorophyll α-fluorescence data for the subsequent growing season. In contrast to model predictions, the calculated air-sea CO2 fluxes (ranging from +3.7 to −4.8 mmol m−2 d−1) showed an increased oceanic CO2 uptake in the Bay of Biscay following the warmer winter of 2006/2007 associated with wind speed and sea surface temperature differences.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bar, Marijke W.; Ullgren, Jenny E.; Thunnell, Robert C.; Wakeham, Stuart G.; Brummer, Geert-Jan A.; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan;
    Project: NWO | Perturbations of System E... (11030), EC | DIOLS (339206), NWO | TRAFFIC: Transatlantic fl... (9378), EC | DUSTTRAFFIC (311152)

    In this study we analyzed sediment trap time series from five tropical sites to assess seasonal variations in concentrations and fluxes of long-chain diols (LCDs) and associated proxies with emphasis on the long-chain diol index (LDI) temperature proxy. For the tropical Atlantic, we observe that generally less than 2 % of LCDs settling from the water column are preserved in the sediment. The Atlantic and Mozambique Channel traps reveal minimal seasonal variations in the LDI, similar to the two other lipid-based temperature proxies TEX86 and U37K′. In addition, annual mean LDI-derived temperatures are in good agreement with the annual mean satellite-derived sea surface temperatures (SSTs). In contrast, the LDI in the Cariaco Basin shows larger seasonal variation, as do the TEX86 and U37K′. Here, the LDI underestimates SST during the warmest months, which is possibly due to summer stratification and the habitat depth of the diol producers deepening to around 20–30 m. Surface sediment LDI temperatures in the Atlantic and Mozambique Channel compare well with the average LDI-derived temperatures from the overlying sediment traps, as well as with decadal annual mean SST. Lastly, we observed large seasonal variations in the diol index, as an indicator of upwelling conditions, at three sites: in the eastern Atlantic, potentially linked to Guinea Dome upwelling; in the Cariaco Basin, likely caused by seasonal upwelling; and in the Mozambique Channel, where diol index variations may be driven by upwelling from favorable winds and/or eddy migration.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    de Bar, Marijke W; Ullgren, Jenny; Thunell, Robert C; Wakeham, Stuart G; Brummer, Geert-Jan A; Stuut, Jan-Berend W; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Schouten, Stefan;
    Project: EC | DUSTTRAFFIC (311152), NWO | TRAFFIC: Transatlantic fl... (9378), EC | DIOLS (339206)

    In this study we have analyzed sediment trap time series from five tropical sites to assess seasonal variations in concentrations and fluxes of long-chain diols (LCDs) and associated proxies with emphasis on the Long chain Diol Index (LDI). For the tropical Atlantic, we observe that generally less than 2 % of LCDs settling from the water column are preserved in the sediment. The Atlantic and Mozambique Channel traps reveal minimal seasonal variations in the LDI, similar to the TEX86 and UK´37. However, annual mean LDI-derived temperatures are in good agreement with the annual mean satellite-derived sea surface temperatures (SSTs). In the Cariaco Basin the LDI shows larger seasonal variation, as do the TEX86 and UK´37. Here, the LDI underestimates SST during the warmest months, which is likely due to summer stratification and the habitat depth of the diol producers deepening to around 20 to 30 m. Surface sediment LDI temperatures in the Atlantic and Mozambique Channel compare well with the average LDI-derived temperatures from the overlying sediment traps, as well as with decadal annual mean SST. Lastly, we observed large seasonal variations in the Diol Index, as indicator of upwelling conditions, at three sites, potentially linked to Guinea Dome upwelling (Eastern Atlantic), seasonal upwelling (Cariaco Basin) and seasonal upwelling and/or eddy migration (Mozambique Channel).

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The following results are related to European Marine Science. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
3 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dumousseaud, C.; Achterberg, E. P.; Tyrrell, T.; Charalampopoulou, A.; Schuster, U.; Hartman, M.; Hydes, D. J.;
    Project: EC | EPOCA (211384)

    Future climate change as a result of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations is expected to strongly affect the oceans, with shallower winter mixing and consequent reduction in primary production and oceanic carbon drawdown in low and mid-latitudinal oceanic regions. Here we test this hypothesis by examining the effects of cold and warm winters on the carbonate system in the surface waters of the Northeast Atlantic Ocean for the period between 2005 and 2007. Monthly observations were made between the English Channel and the Bay of Biscay using a ship of opportunity program. During the colder winter of 2005/2006, the maximum depth of the mixed layer reached up to 650 m in the Bay of Biscay, whilst during the warmer (by 2.6 ± 0.5 °C) winter of 2006/2007 the mixed layer depth reached only 300 m. The inter-annual differences in late winter concentrations of nitrate (2.8 ± 1.1 μmol l−1) and dissolved inorganic carbon (22 ± 6 μmol kg−1, with higher concentrations at the end of the colder winter (2005/2006), led to differences in the dissolved oxygen anomaly and the chlorophyll α-fluorescence data for the subsequent growing season. In contrast to model predictions, the calculated air-sea CO2 fluxes (ranging from +3.7 to −4.8 mmol m−2 d−1) showed an increased oceanic CO2 uptake in the Bay of Biscay following the warmer winter of 2006/2007 associated with wind speed and sea surface temperature differences.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bar, Marijke W.; Ullgren, Jenny E.; Thunnell, Robert C.; Wakeham, Stuart G.; Brummer, Geert-Jan A.; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan;
    Project: NWO | Perturbations of System E... (11030), EC | DIOLS (339206), NWO | TRAFFIC: Transatlantic fl... (9378), EC | DUSTTRAFFIC (311152)

    In this study we analyzed sediment trap time series from five tropical sites to assess seasonal variations in concentrations and fluxes of long-chain diols (LCDs) and associated proxies with emphasis on the long-chain diol index (LDI) temperature proxy. For the tropical Atlantic, we observe that generally less than 2 % of LCDs settling from the water column are preserved in the sediment. The Atlantic and Mozambique Channel traps reveal minimal seasonal variations in the LDI, similar to the two other lipid-based temperature proxies TEX86 and U37K′. In addition, annual mean LDI-derived temperatures are in good agreement with the annual mean satellite-derived sea surface temperatures (SSTs). In contrast, the LDI in the Cariaco Basin shows larger seasonal variation, as do the TEX86 and U37K′. Here, the LDI underestimates SST during the warmest months, which is possibly due to summer stratification and the habitat depth of the diol producers deepening to around 20–30 m. Surface sediment LDI temperatures in the Atlantic and Mozambique Channel compare well with the average LDI-derived temperatures from the overlying sediment traps, as well as with decadal annual mean SST. Lastly, we observed large seasonal variations in the diol index, as an indicator of upwelling conditions, at three sites: in the eastern Atlantic, potentially linked to Guinea Dome upwelling; in the Cariaco Basin, likely caused by seasonal upwelling; and in the Mozambique Channel, where diol index variations may be driven by upwelling from favorable winds and/or eddy migration.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    de Bar, Marijke W; Ullgren, Jenny; Thunell, Robert C; Wakeham, Stuart G; Brummer, Geert-Jan A; Stuut, Jan-Berend W; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Schouten, Stefan;
    Project: EC | DUSTTRAFFIC (311152), NWO | TRAFFIC: Transatlantic fl... (9378), EC | DIOLS (339206)

    In this study we have analyzed sediment trap time series from five tropical sites to assess seasonal variations in concentrations and fluxes of long-chain diols (LCDs) and associated proxies with emphasis on the Long chain Diol Index (LDI). For the tropical Atlantic, we observe that generally less than 2 % of LCDs settling from the water column are preserved in the sediment. The Atlantic and Mozambique Channel traps reveal minimal seasonal variations in the LDI, similar to the TEX86 and UK´37. However, annual mean LDI-derived temperatures are in good agreement with the annual mean satellite-derived sea surface temperatures (SSTs). In the Cariaco Basin the LDI shows larger seasonal variation, as do the TEX86 and UK´37. Here, the LDI underestimates SST during the warmest months, which is likely due to summer stratification and the habitat depth of the diol producers deepening to around 20 to 30 m. Surface sediment LDI temperatures in the Atlantic and Mozambique Channel compare well with the average LDI-derived temperatures from the overlying sediment traps, as well as with decadal annual mean SST. Lastly, we observed large seasonal variations in the Diol Index, as indicator of upwelling conditions, at three sites, potentially linked to Guinea Dome upwelling (Eastern Atlantic), seasonal upwelling (Cariaco Basin) and seasonal upwelling and/or eddy migration (Mozambique Channel).

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