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137 Research products, page 1 of 14

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  • English
    Authors: 
    Bravo, Miguel A.; Román, Isidro; Andreu, Ana C.; Arribas, Rosa; Márquez-Ferrando, Rocío; Díaz-Delgado, Ricardo; Bustamante, Javier;
    Publisher: DIGITAL.CSIC
    Country: Spain

    The monitoring of the fish community in Doñana wetlands was initiated in 2004 as part of the Monitoring Program of Natural Resources and Processes. The aim was to obtain a temporal and continuous series of data in the abundance and distribution of fish species to analyze the evolution of their numbers and estimates biodiversity values. Data were recorded annually between 2004-2019 by more than 2 members of the monitoring team which performed samplings in different locations twice per year in winter-spring and summer seasons when the study sites are flooded. The fishes were sampled at the 139 stations classified according to their location (on either aeolian sands or marshland). Funnel traps were used as a sampling method. Between 5-9 funnel traps were randomly distributed (until 50 cm of depth) in each location, depending of the flooded area and depth. The traps were left for 24 hours and emptied the content into white sorting pans. Individuals were counted and identified until the maximun taxonomic level in the field and realease. During samplings, it was identified 15 families. The most abundances were Poecilidae and Cyprinidae. Data recorded during the surveys included species identification, number of individuals, sex and life stage (pupa, larvae, inmature, mature) of the organisms when possible, as well as the time and georreferenced data of the observation. Between 2004-2007 data was registered in Excel file and since 2008 data was recorded in CyberTracker sequence). The protocol used has been supervised by researchers and the data have been validated by the members who performed the sampling. 1. Don_fish_ev_20221222: eventID, intitutionCode, institutionID, datasetName, eventDate, year, month, day, country, stateProvince, location, localityID, locality, decimalLatitude, decimalLongitude, habitat, sampleSizeUnit, sampleSizeEffort, DynamicPropiertiesEvent, eventRemarks, recordeBy.-- 2. Don_fish_occ_20221222: eventID, occurrenceID, individualCount, sex, lifeStage, kingdom, phylum, order, family, genus, specificEpithet, scientificName.-- 3. Don_fish_mof_20221222: OccurrenceID, measurementID, measurementType, measurementValue, measurementUnit, measurementMethod. Dataset are structured following well-established data formats. Three files are provided. The first file (Don_fish_ev_20221222) contains the information of each event (eventID, event date, geographical coordinates, sample effort, etc…); the second file (Don_fish_occ_20221222) contains the information of the occurrences of fish species recorded in each station, taxonomic classification; and the third file (Don_fish_mof_20221222) provide information of the biometric variable (weight) of fish sample in each occurrence. We acknowledge financial support from National Parks Autonomous Agency (OAPN) between 2002-2007; Singular Scientific and Technical Infrastructures from the Spanish Science and Innovation Ministry (ICTS-MICINN); Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, Fisheries and Sustainable Development from the Regional Government of Andalusia (CAGPDES-JA) since 2007; and Doñana Biological Station from the Spanish National Research Council (EBD-CSIC) since all the study period (2005). Peer reviewed

  • Research data . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reñé, Albert; Timoneda Solé, Natàlia; Sarno, Diana; Zingone, Adriana; Margiotta, Francesca; Passarelli, Augusto; Gallia, Roberto; Tramontano, Ferdinando; Montresor, Marina; Garcés, Esther;
    Publisher: CSIC - Instituto de Ciencias del Mar (ICM)
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | ASSEMBLE Plus (730984)

    The presence of phytoplankton parasites along the water column was explored at the Long Term Ecological Station MareChiara (LTER-MC) in the Gulf of Naples (Mediterranean Sea) in October 2019. Microscopy analyses showed diatoms dominating the phytoplankton community in the upper layers (0-20 m). Metabarcoding data from the water column showed the presence of Chytridiomycota predominantly in the upper layers coinciding with the vertical distribution of diatoms. Laboratory incubations of natural samples enriched with different diatom cultures confirmed parasitic interactions of some of those chytrids – including members of Kappamyces – with diatom taxa. The temporal dynamics of diatoms and chytrids was also explored in a three-year metabarcoding time-series (2011-2013) from surface waters of the study area and in sediment samples. Chytrids were recurrently present at low relative abundances, and some taxa found to infect diatoms in the incubation experiments were also identified in the ASV time-series. However, co-occurrence analyses did not show any clear or recurrent pairing patterns for chytrid and diatom taxa along the three years. The chytrid community in the sediments showed a clearly different species composition compared to the recorded in the water column samples, with higher diversity and relative abundance. The combination of observations, incubations and metabarcoding confirmed that parasites are a common component of marine protist communities at LTER-MC. Host-parasite interactions must be determined and quantified to understand their role and the impact they have on phytoplankton dynamics File1: VERDI_samples_parameters.xlsx - Physico-chemical variables obtained from CTD profile - Inorganic nutrients concentrations - Chlorophyll-a concentrations - Organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations - Phytoplankton abundances - Detections of chytrids File 2: VERDI_asv_table.tbl: ASV abundances from natural samples and incubations File 3: VERDI_tax_table.tbl: Taxonomic assignments of ASVs File 4: VERDI_asv_seqs.fa: Sequences of ASVs File 5: VERDI_incubations_images.zip - Compilation of images taken during incubations with diatoms - Physico-chemical variables obtained from CTD profile - Inorganic nutrients concentrations - Chlorophyll-a concentrations - Organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations - Phytoplankton abundances - Detections of chytrids - Metabarcoding ASV abundances from natural samples and incubations - Metabarcoding Taxonomic assignments of ASVs - Metabarcoding Sequences of ASVs - Compilation of images taken during incubations with diatoms - European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 730984, ASSEMBLE Plus project. - Spanish MICINN Project SMART (PID2020-112978GB-I00) - The research program LTER-MC is funded by the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn Peer reviewed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Galimany, E. (Eva); Hernandis, S. (Sebastián); Hernández-Contreras, A. (Ángel); Gómez-Martínez, F.J. (Francisco José); Albentosa, M. (Marina); Da-Costa, F. (Fiz);
    Publisher: Centro Oceanográfico de Vigo
    Country: Spain
  • Other research product . Lecture . 2022 . Embargo End Date: 31 Dec 2025
    Open Access Spanish; Castilian
    Authors: 
    Fernández, I. (Ignacio);
    Publisher: Centro Oceanográfico de Vigo
    Country: Spain
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Priscilla, Le Mézo; Guiet Jérôme; Scherrer, Kim; Bianchi, Daniele; Galbraith, Eric;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | BIGSEA (682602)

    Model outputs and code used for the study "Global nutrient cycling by commercially targeted marine fish" published in Biogeosciences (Le Mézo et al., 2022). composite4b_cycling_MCV3_PotH_LME_2010_R2_2010_fNPP7_ks24_p50_c7_newFNPP_Online_nruns_31 = model outputs with composite.maps contains the 2D fields y200 refers to fields at the pristine state and yglo to fields at the global peak catch. dfish is the fish biomass in wet weight per gram (size class) resp5 is the cycling rate that was used in the paper (defined in the Methods section) Main_script.mlx = main code used to compute the nutrient content and cycling of fish and the comparisons with other fields size_bins_width.m = code used to compute the model size bin width data_annual.mat = NO3, PO4, NPP, C export fields composite_MCV3_PotH_LME_2010_R2_2010_fNPP7_ks24_p50_c7_newFNPP_Online_nruns_31.mat is the model outputs with cyc.composite.maps.yglo.mean.harvest being the catch field at global peak catch solublefraction_Mahowald2009_360x180.nc is the Fe deposition field Brahneyetal2015_nitrogenandphosphorus2x2annualdep_360x180.nc is the N deposition field mask_LME.mat is the mask of LME areas ocean_topaz_tracers.timmean.BOATS_grid_fed.nc is the modeled dissolved Fe concentrations in seawater by the TOPAZ model zeu_lee_modis_aqua_average_2002-2019.nc is the euphotic depth field used to compute the nutrient concentrations woa05_nitrate_month.nc is the NO3 field used to make the spatial interpolations of the Fe:C stoichiometric ratios. mass_50sizes_boats.mat is the mass of each size class of the BOATS model Tables S2 and S3.xlsx litterature compilation of values for N and P in fish and zooplankton Galbraith et al (2019) SI.pdf is the supplement to Galbraith et al. (2019) in which the data compilation for the Fe content of fish, zooplankton and phytoplankton can be found.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bode, A. (Antonio);
    Publisher: Centro Oceanográfico de A Coruña
    Country: Spain

    Invited lecture. Online live Session 2 Summary: trophic levels: a measure of functional diversity stable isotope tools: bulk vs. compound-specific analyses the basis: differential isotopic fractionation trophic indicators: trophic position, baselines, and much more application examples progress: multitrophic models, fingerprinting MCIN/AEI/10.13039/501100011033

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Huertas, I. Emma; Amaya-Vías, Silvia; Flecha, Susana; Makaoui, Ahmed; Pérez, Fiz F.;
    Publisher: DIGITAL.CSIC
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | PERSEUS (287600), EC | CARBOCHANGE (264879), EC | COMFORT (820989)

    The database provides discrete measurements of carbon system parameters in water samples collected at 3 stations that form the marine time series GIFT during 33 oceanographic campaigns conducted over 2005–2021. Geographic coordinates of sampling stations are provided. Some physical data (i.e. pressure, temperature and salinity) are also included. Moreover, pH data obtained with a SAMI-pH sensor (Sunburst Sensors, LLC)) attached to a mooring line deployed in the Strait of Gibraltar for the years 2016 and 2017 are provided. During the cruises, a temperature and salinity profile was obtained with a Seabird 911Plus CTD probe. Seawater was subsequently collected for biogeochemical analysis using Niskin bottles immersed in an oceanographic rosette platform at variable depths (from 5 to 8 levels) depending on the instant position of the interface between the Atlantic and Mediterranean flows that was identified by CTD profiles. The biogeochemical variables shown in the database are pH in total scale at 25 °C (pHT25), total alkalinity (AT), and inorganic nutrients (phosphate, PO43and Silicate, SiO44−). pHT25 data were obtained by the spectrophotometric method with m-cresol purple as the indicator (Clayton & Byrne 1993). Samples were taken directly from the oceanographic bottles in 10 cm path-length optical glass cells and measurements were carried out with a Shimadzu UV-2401PC spectrophotometer containing a 25 °C-thermostated cells holder. Samples for AT analysis were collected in 500-ml borosilicate bottles, and poisoned with 100 μl of HgCl2-saturated aqueous solution and stored until measurement in the laboratory. AT was measured by potential titration according to Mintrop et al. (2000) with a Titroprocessor (model Metrohm 794 from 2005-2020 and model Metrothm 888 for 2021). Water samples (5 mL, two replicates) for inorganic nutrients determination were taken, filtered immediately (Whatman GF/F, 0.7 μm) and stored frozen for later analyses in the shore-based laboratory. Nutrients concentrations were measured with a continuous flow auto-analyzer using standard colorimetric techniques (Hansen & Koroleff 1999). 2. Methods for processing the data: 3. Instrument- or software-specific information needed to interpret/reproduce the data, please indicate their location: 4. Standards and calibration information, if appropriate: 5. Environmental/experimental conditions: 6. Describe any quality-assurance procedures performed on the data: 7. People involved with sample collection, processing, analysis and/or submission, please specify using CREDIT roles https://casrai.org/credit/: Chief Scientists -I.Emma Huertas/Susana Flecha; Hydro: Who -Susana Flecha/David Roque/Silvia Amaya-Vías/Angélica Enrique; Nuts: Who -Manuel Arjonilla/ Status - final; Silicate and Phosphate Autoanalizer Hansen and Koroleff (1999) This research was supported by the COMFORT project that has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 820989 (project COMFORT, "Our common future ocean in the Earth system – quantifying coupled cycles of carbon, oxygen, and nutrients for determining and achieving safe operating spaces with respect to tipping points).” Funding was also provided by the European projects CARBOOCEAN (FP6-511176), CARBOCHANGE (FP7-264879), PERSEUS (FP7-287600) and the Junta de Andalucía TECADE project (PY20_00293). The dataset is subject to a Creative Commons License Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International. F.F.P. was supported by the BOCATS2 (PID2019-104279GB-C21) project funded by MCIN/AEI/10.13039/501100011033. SAV was supported by a pre-doctoral grant FPU19/04338 from the Spanish Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Bennett, Scott; Alcovero, Teresa; Kletou, Demetris; Antoniou, Charalampos; Boada, Jordi; Buñuel, Xavier; Cucala, Lidia; Jorda, Gabriel; Kleitou, Periklis; Roca, Guillem; +4 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | DPaTh-To-Adapt (659246)

    [Methods] Experiment locations and climate Trans-Mediterranean translocation of Posidonia oceanica fragments took place between Catalunya (Spain), Mallorca (Spain) and Cyprus in July 2018 and were monitored until July 2019 (Fig. 1). Sea surface temperature data for each transplant site were based on daily SST maps with a spatial resolution of 1/4°, obtained from the National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI, https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oisst ) (Reynolds et al. 2007). These maps have been generated through the optimal interpolation of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data for the period 1981-2019. Underwater temperature loggers (ONSET Hobo pro v2 Data logger) were deployed at the transplant sites in Catalunya, Mallorca and Cyprus and recorded hourly temperatures throughout the duration of the experiment (one year). In order to obtain an extended time series of temperature at transplant sites, a calibration procedure was performed comparing logger data with sea surface temperature from the nearest point on SST maps. In particular, SST data were linearly fitted to logger data for the common period. Then, the calibration coefficients were applied to the whole SST time series to obtain corrected-SST data and reconstruct daily habitat temperatures from 1981-2019. Local climate data was also compared to the global thermal distribution of P. oceanica to assess how representative experimental sites were of the thermal distribution of the species (Supplementary materials). Collectively, seawater temperatures from the three locations span the 16th - 99th percentile of temperatures observed across the global thermal distribution of P. oceanica. As such Catalunya, Mallorca and Cyprus are herein considered to represent the cool-edge, centre and warm-edge of P. oceanica distribution, respectively. Transplantation took place toward warmer climates and procedural controls were conducted within each source location, resulting in six source-to-recipient combinations (i.e. treatments, Fig. 1). Initial collection of P. oceanica, handling and transplantation was carried out simultaneously by coordinated teams in July 2018 (Table S1). Each recipient location was subsequently resampled four times over the course of the experiment, in August/September 2018 (T1), October 2018 (T2), April 2019 (T3) and May/June 2019 (T4, Table S1). Between 60-100 fragments were collected for each treatment. A fragment was defined as a section of P. oceanica containing one apical shoot connected with approximately five vertical shoots by approximately 10-15 cm of rhizome with intact roots. Collection occurred at two sites within each location, separated by approximately 1 km. Within sites, collections were conducted between 4 – 5 m depth and were spaced across the meadow to minimise the dominance of a single clone and damage to the meadow. Upon collection, fragments were transported for up to one hour back to the nearest laboratory in shaded seawater. Handling methods In the laboratory, fragments were placed into holding tanks with aerated seawater, at ambient temperature and a 14:10 light-dark cycle. All shoots were clipped to 25 cm length (from meristem to the tip of the longest leaves), to standardise initial conditions and reduce biomass for transportation. For transport by plane or ferry between locations, fragments were packed in layers within cool-boxes. Each layer was separated by frozen cool-packs wrapped in wet tea towels (rinsed in sea water). All fragments spent 12 hrs inside a cool-box irrespective of their recipient destination, including procedural controls (i.e. cool-cool, centre-centre and warm-warm) to simulate the transit times of the plants travelling furthest from their source location (Fig. 1a). On arrival at the destination, fragments were placed in holding tanks with aerated seawater at ambient temperature as described above in their recipient location for 48 hrs, prior to field transplantation. Measurement methods One day prior to transplantation, fragments were tagged with a unique number and attached to U-shaped peg with cable-ties. Morphological traits for each fragment were measured and included: 1) length of the longest apical leaf, width and number of leaves 2) total number of bite marks on leaves of three vertical shoots per fragment, 3) number of vertical shoots, 4) leaf count of three vertical shoots per fragment and 5) overall horizontal rhizome length. A subset (n=10) of fragments per treatment were marked prior transplantation to measure shoot growth. To do this, all shoots within a single fragment were pierced using a hypodermic needle. Two holes were pierced side-by-side at the base of the leaf/top of the meristem. Transplant methods All transplant sites were located in 4 – 5 m depth in area of open dead-matte, surrounded by P. oceanica meadow. In Mallorca and Cyprus, fragments were distributed between two sites, separated by approximately 1 km. In Catalunya, a lack of suitable dead matte habitat, meant that all fragments were placed in one site. Fragments were planted along parallel transects at 50 cm intervals and with a 50 cm gap between parallel transects (Fig. S1). Different treatments were mixed and deployed haphazardly along each transect. Resampling methods and herbivory On day 10 of the experiment, a severe herbivory event was recorded at both warm-edge translocation sites. Scaled photos of all fragments were taken at this time to record the effects of herbivory on transplants. At the end of each main sampling period (T0 – T1, T1-T2 and T3 – T4), all pierced fragments were collected and taken back to the laboratory to measure shoot growth. At T1, T2 and T3, additional sets of fragments (n = 10 per treatment) were marked using the piercing method to record growth in the subsequent time period. In addition, at T1 and T3, n = 20 shoots within the natural meadow at each site were marked to compare growth rates between the native meadow and transplants. Underwater shoot counts and a scaled photo was taken to record fragment survivorship, shoot mortality, bite marks, and shoot length among all remaining fragments within each site and sampling time. In the laboratory, morphological measurements (described above) were repeated on the collected fragments and growth of transplant and natural meadow shoots was measured. Growth (shoot elongation, cm d-1) of the marked shoots was obtained by measuring the length from the base of meristem to marked holes of each leaf (new growth) of the shoot and dividing the leaf elongation per shoot by the marking period (in days). For each shoot, total leaf length (cm shoot-1) and the number of new leaves was also recorded. The rate of new leaf production (new leaves shoot-1 d-1) was estimated dividing the number of new leaves produced per shoot and the marking period. New growth was dried at 60 ºC for 48 hrs to determine carbon and nitrogen content of the leaves, and carbon to nitrogen (C:N) ratios. Carbon and nitrogen concentrations in the new growth leaf tissue was measured at the beginning of the experiment and each subsequent time point for each treatment. Nutrient analyses were conducted at Unidade de Técnicas Instrumentais de Análise (University of Coruña, Spain) with an elemental analyser FlashEA112 (ThermoFinnigan). Underwater photos of shoots were analysed using ImageJ software (https://imagej.net). Maximum leaf length on each shoot in warm-edge transplant sites (cool-warm, centre-warm and warm-warm) were recorded for the initial (day 10) herbivore impact, T1, T2 and T3 time-points and related to transplant nutrient concentrations. Herbivore impact was estimated as the proportional change in length of the longest leaf relative to initial length at T0. Thermal stress Long term maximum temperatures were recorded as the average of annual maximum daily temperatures in each transplant site, averaged between years from 1981-2019. Maximum thermal anomalies were calculated as the difference between daily temperatures in a recipient site over the course of the experiment and the long-term maximum temperature in the source site for each corresponding population. ‘Heat stress’ and ‘recovery’ growth periods of the experiment were defined as T0 -T2 (July-October) and T2-T4 (November-June), respectively, corresponding to periods of positive and negative maximum thermal anomalies. Thermal anomalies experienced by the different transplant treatments were plotted using the ‘geom_flame’, function in the ‘HeatwavesR’ package (Schlegel & Smit 2018) of R (version 3.6.1, 2019) . 1. The prevalence of local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity among populations is critical to accurately predicting when and where climate change impacts will occur. Currently, comparisons of thermal performance between populations are untested for most marine species or overlooked by models predicting the thermal sensitivity of species to extirpation. 2. Here we compared the ecological response and recovery of seagrass populations (Posidonia oceanica) to thermal stress throughout a year-long translocation experiment across a 2800 km gradient in ocean climate. Transplants in central and warm-edge locations experienced temperatures >29 ºC, representing thermal anomalies >5ºC above long-term maxima for cool-edge populations, 1.5ºC for central and <1ºC for warm-edge populations. 3. Cool, central and warm-edge populations differed in thermal performance when grown under common conditions, but patterns contrasted with expectations based on thermal geography. Cool-edge populations did not differ from warm-edge populations under common conditions and performed significantly better than central populations in growth and survival. 4. Our findings reveal that thermal performance does not necessarily reflect the thermal geography of a species. We demonstrate that warm-edge populations can be less sensitive to thermal stress than cooler, central populations suggesting that Mediterranean seagrasses have greater resilience to warming than current paradigms suggest. Australian Research Council, Award: DE200100900. Horizon 2020 Framework Programme, Award: 659246. Fundación BBVA. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Expósito N; Rovira J; Sierra J; Gimenez G; Domingo JL; Schuhmacher M;
    Country: Spain

    Microplastics (MPs) are accessible for organisms with active filter feeding strategies, as are many marine molluscs, which live attached or semi-buried in sediments. In the present study, MPs (from 0.02 to 5 mm) concentration, morphology, and composition were determined in consumed mollusc species of the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean Sea). Microplastic concentrations, morphologic characteristics and composition were studied according to species, catchment zones and depuration condition. Finally, human intake of MPs through molluscs' consumption was determined. >2300 individuals were analysed, being 1460 MPs extracted and their size, and polymeric composition registered. Big oysters and mussels showed the highest MPs concentration by individual, with levels of 22.8 ± 14.4 and 18.6 ± 23.0 MPs/individual, respectively. Mean annual MPs (≥20 μm) consumption for adult population was estimated in 8103 MPs/year, with a 95th percentile of 19,418 MPs/year. It suggests that the consumption of molluscs is an important route of MPs exposure for the Catalan population.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Raja, Maria; Rosell Melé, Antoni;
    Country: Spain

    Unidad de excelencia María de Maeztu CEX2019-000940-M This dataset contains supporting information for "Quantitative link between sedimentary chlorin and sea-surface chlorophyll-a". The dataset consists of global oceanic biogeochemical data from sea-surface, water column and surface sediments. The dataset includes sedimentary chlorin and sea-surface chlorophyll concentration, total organic carbon content, oxygen concentration and mass accumulation rate, among other biogeochemical parameters.

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The following results are related to European Marine Science. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
137 Research products, page 1 of 14
  • English
    Authors: 
    Bravo, Miguel A.; Román, Isidro; Andreu, Ana C.; Arribas, Rosa; Márquez-Ferrando, Rocío; Díaz-Delgado, Ricardo; Bustamante, Javier;
    Publisher: DIGITAL.CSIC
    Country: Spain

    The monitoring of the fish community in Doñana wetlands was initiated in 2004 as part of the Monitoring Program of Natural Resources and Processes. The aim was to obtain a temporal and continuous series of data in the abundance and distribution of fish species to analyze the evolution of their numbers and estimates biodiversity values. Data were recorded annually between 2004-2019 by more than 2 members of the monitoring team which performed samplings in different locations twice per year in winter-spring and summer seasons when the study sites are flooded. The fishes were sampled at the 139 stations classified according to their location (on either aeolian sands or marshland). Funnel traps were used as a sampling method. Between 5-9 funnel traps were randomly distributed (until 50 cm of depth) in each location, depending of the flooded area and depth. The traps were left for 24 hours and emptied the content into white sorting pans. Individuals were counted and identified until the maximun taxonomic level in the field and realease. During samplings, it was identified 15 families. The most abundances were Poecilidae and Cyprinidae. Data recorded during the surveys included species identification, number of individuals, sex and life stage (pupa, larvae, inmature, mature) of the organisms when possible, as well as the time and georreferenced data of the observation. Between 2004-2007 data was registered in Excel file and since 2008 data was recorded in CyberTracker sequence). The protocol used has been supervised by researchers and the data have been validated by the members who performed the sampling. 1. Don_fish_ev_20221222: eventID, intitutionCode, institutionID, datasetName, eventDate, year, month, day, country, stateProvince, location, localityID, locality, decimalLatitude, decimalLongitude, habitat, sampleSizeUnit, sampleSizeEffort, DynamicPropiertiesEvent, eventRemarks, recordeBy.-- 2. Don_fish_occ_20221222: eventID, occurrenceID, individualCount, sex, lifeStage, kingdom, phylum, order, family, genus, specificEpithet, scientificName.-- 3. Don_fish_mof_20221222: OccurrenceID, measurementID, measurementType, measurementValue, measurementUnit, measurementMethod. Dataset are structured following well-established data formats. Three files are provided. The first file (Don_fish_ev_20221222) contains the information of each event (eventID, event date, geographical coordinates, sample effort, etc…); the second file (Don_fish_occ_20221222) contains the information of the occurrences of fish species recorded in each station, taxonomic classification; and the third file (Don_fish_mof_20221222) provide information of the biometric variable (weight) of fish sample in each occurrence. We acknowledge financial support from National Parks Autonomous Agency (OAPN) between 2002-2007; Singular Scientific and Technical Infrastructures from the Spanish Science and Innovation Ministry (ICTS-MICINN); Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, Fisheries and Sustainable Development from the Regional Government of Andalusia (CAGPDES-JA) since 2007; and Doñana Biological Station from the Spanish National Research Council (EBD-CSIC) since all the study period (2005). Peer reviewed

  • Research data . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reñé, Albert; Timoneda Solé, Natàlia; Sarno, Diana; Zingone, Adriana; Margiotta, Francesca; Passarelli, Augusto; Gallia, Roberto; Tramontano, Ferdinando; Montresor, Marina; Garcés, Esther;
    Publisher: CSIC - Instituto de Ciencias del Mar (ICM)
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | ASSEMBLE Plus (730984)

    The presence of phytoplankton parasites along the water column was explored at the Long Term Ecological Station MareChiara (LTER-MC) in the Gulf of Naples (Mediterranean Sea) in October 2019. Microscopy analyses showed diatoms dominating the phytoplankton community in the upper layers (0-20 m). Metabarcoding data from the water column showed the presence of Chytridiomycota predominantly in the upper layers coinciding with the vertical distribution of diatoms. Laboratory incubations of natural samples enriched with different diatom cultures confirmed parasitic interactions of some of those chytrids – including members of Kappamyces – with diatom taxa. The temporal dynamics of diatoms and chytrids was also explored in a three-year metabarcoding time-series (2011-2013) from surface waters of the study area and in sediment samples. Chytrids were recurrently present at low relative abundances, and some taxa found to infect diatoms in the incubation experiments were also identified in the ASV time-series. However, co-occurrence analyses did not show any clear or recurrent pairing patterns for chytrid and diatom taxa along the three years. The chytrid community in the sediments showed a clearly different species composition compared to the recorded in the water column samples, with higher diversity and relative abundance. The combination of observations, incubations and metabarcoding confirmed that parasites are a common component of marine protist communities at LTER-MC. Host-parasite interactions must be determined and quantified to understand their role and the impact they have on phytoplankton dynamics File1: VERDI_samples_parameters.xlsx - Physico-chemical variables obtained from CTD profile - Inorganic nutrients concentrations - Chlorophyll-a concentrations - Organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations - Phytoplankton abundances - Detections of chytrids File 2: VERDI_asv_table.tbl: ASV abundances from natural samples and incubations File 3: VERDI_tax_table.tbl: Taxonomic assignments of ASVs File 4: VERDI_asv_seqs.fa: Sequences of ASVs File 5: VERDI_incubations_images.zip - Compilation of images taken during incubations with diatoms - Physico-chemical variables obtained from CTD profile - Inorganic nutrients concentrations - Chlorophyll-a concentrations - Organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations - Phytoplankton abundances - Detections of chytrids - Metabarcoding ASV abundances from natural samples and incubations - Metabarcoding Taxonomic assignments of ASVs - Metabarcoding Sequences of ASVs - Compilation of images taken during incubations with diatoms - European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 730984, ASSEMBLE Plus project. - Spanish MICINN Project SMART (PID2020-112978GB-I00) - The research program LTER-MC is funded by the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn Peer reviewed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Galimany, E. (Eva); Hernandis, S. (Sebastián); Hernández-Contreras, A. (Ángel); Gómez-Martínez, F.J. (Francisco José); Albentosa, M. (Marina); Da-Costa, F. (Fiz);
    Publisher: Centro Oceanográfico de Vigo
    Country: Spain
  • Other research product . Lecture . 2022 . Embargo End Date: 31 Dec 2025
    Open Access Spanish; Castilian
    Authors: 
    Fernández, I. (Ignacio);
    Publisher: Centro Oceanográfico de Vigo
    Country: Spain
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Priscilla, Le Mézo; Guiet Jérôme; Scherrer, Kim; Bianchi, Daniele; Galbraith, Eric;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | BIGSEA (682602)

    Model outputs and code used for the study "Global nutrient cycling by commercially targeted marine fish" published in Biogeosciences (Le Mézo et al., 2022). composite4b_cycling_MCV3_PotH_LME_2010_R2_2010_fNPP7_ks24_p50_c7_newFNPP_Online_nruns_31 = model outputs with composite.maps contains the 2D fields y200 refers to fields at the pristine state and yglo to fields at the global peak catch. dfish is the fish biomass in wet weight per gram (size class) resp5 is the cycling rate that was used in the paper (defined in the Methods section) Main_script.mlx = main code used to compute the nutrient content and cycling of fish and the comparisons with other fields size_bins_width.m = code used to compute the model size bin width data_annual.mat = NO3, PO4, NPP, C export fields composite_MCV3_PotH_LME_2010_R2_2010_fNPP7_ks24_p50_c7_newFNPP_Online_nruns_31.mat is the model outputs with cyc.composite.maps.yglo.mean.harvest being the catch field at global peak catch solublefraction_Mahowald2009_360x180.nc is the Fe deposition field Brahneyetal2015_nitrogenandphosphorus2x2annualdep_360x180.nc is the N deposition field mask_LME.mat is the mask of LME areas ocean_topaz_tracers.timmean.BOATS_grid_fed.nc is the modeled dissolved Fe concentrations in seawater by the TOPAZ model zeu_lee_modis_aqua_average_2002-2019.nc is the euphotic depth field used to compute the nutrient concentrations woa05_nitrate_month.nc is the NO3 field used to make the spatial interpolations of the Fe:C stoichiometric ratios. mass_50sizes_boats.mat is the mass of each size class of the BOATS model Tables S2 and S3.xlsx litterature compilation of values for N and P in fish and zooplankton Galbraith et al (2019) SI.pdf is the supplement to Galbraith et al. (2019) in which the data compilation for the Fe content of fish, zooplankton and phytoplankton can be found.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bode, A. (Antonio);
    Publisher: Centro Oceanográfico de A Coruña
    Country: Spain

    Invited lecture. Online live Session 2 Summary: trophic levels: a measure of functional diversity stable isotope tools: bulk vs. compound-specific analyses the basis: differential isotopic fractionation trophic indicators: trophic position, baselines, and much more application examples progress: multitrophic models, fingerprinting MCIN/AEI/10.13039/501100011033

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Huertas, I. Emma; Amaya-Vías, Silvia; Flecha, Susana; Makaoui, Ahmed; Pérez, Fiz F.;
    Publisher: DIGITAL.CSIC
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | PERSEUS (287600), EC | CARBOCHANGE (264879), EC | COMFORT (820989)

    The database provides discrete measurements of carbon system parameters in water samples collected at 3 stations that form the marine time series GIFT during 33 oceanographic campaigns conducted over 2005–2021. Geographic coordinates of sampling stations are provided. Some physical data (i.e. pressure, temperature and salinity) are also included. Moreover, pH data obtained with a SAMI-pH sensor (Sunburst Sensors, LLC)) attached to a mooring line deployed in the Strait of Gibraltar for the years 2016 and 2017 are provided. During the cruises, a temperature and salinity profile was obtained with a Seabird 911Plus CTD probe. Seawater was subsequently collected for biogeochemical analysis using Niskin bottles immersed in an oceanographic rosette platform at variable depths (from 5 to 8 levels) depending on the instant position of the interface between the Atlantic and Mediterranean flows that was identified by CTD profiles. The biogeochemical variables shown in the database are pH in total scale at 25 °C (pHT25), total alkalinity (AT), and inorganic nutrients (phosphate, PO43and Silicate, SiO44−). pHT25 data were obtained by the spectrophotometric method with m-cresol purple as the indicator (Clayton & Byrne 1993). Samples were taken directly from the oceanographic bottles in 10 cm path-length optical glass cells and measurements were carried out with a Shimadzu UV-2401PC spectrophotometer containing a 25 °C-thermostated cells holder. Samples for AT analysis were collected in 500-ml borosilicate bottles, and poisoned with 100 μl of HgCl2-saturated aqueous solution and stored until measurement in the laboratory. AT was measured by potential titration according to Mintrop et al. (2000) with a Titroprocessor (model Metrohm 794 from 2005-2020 and model Metrothm 888 for 2021). Water samples (5 mL, two replicates) for inorganic nutrients determination were taken, filtered immediately (Whatman GF/F, 0.7 μm) and stored frozen for later analyses in the shore-based laboratory. Nutrients concentrations were measured with a continuous flow auto-analyzer using standard colorimetric techniques (Hansen & Koroleff 1999). 2. Methods for processing the data: 3. Instrument- or software-specific information needed to interpret/reproduce the data, please indicate their location: 4. Standards and calibration information, if appropriate: 5. Environmental/experimental conditions: 6. Describe any quality-assurance procedures performed on the data: 7. People involved with sample collection, processing, analysis and/or submission, please specify using CREDIT roles https://casrai.org/credit/: Chief Scientists -I.Emma Huertas/Susana Flecha; Hydro: Who -Susana Flecha/David Roque/Silvia Amaya-Vías/Angélica Enrique; Nuts: Who -Manuel Arjonilla/ Status - final; Silicate and Phosphate Autoanalizer Hansen and Koroleff (1999) This research was supported by the COMFORT project that has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 820989 (project COMFORT, "Our common future ocean in the Earth system – quantifying coupled cycles of carbon, oxygen, and nutrients for determining and achieving safe operating spaces with respect to tipping points).” Funding was also provided by the European projects CARBOOCEAN (FP6-511176), CARBOCHANGE (FP7-264879), PERSEUS (FP7-287600) and the Junta de Andalucía TECADE project (PY20_00293). The dataset is subject to a Creative Commons License Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International. F.F.P. was supported by the BOCATS2 (PID2019-104279GB-C21) project funded by MCIN/AEI/10.13039/501100011033. SAV was supported by a pre-doctoral grant FPU19/04338 from the Spanish Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Bennett, Scott; Alcovero, Teresa; Kletou, Demetris; Antoniou, Charalampos; Boada, Jordi; Buñuel, Xavier; Cucala, Lidia; Jorda, Gabriel; Kleitou, Periklis; Roca, Guillem; +4 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | DPaTh-To-Adapt (659246)

    [Methods] Experiment locations and climate Trans-Mediterranean translocation of Posidonia oceanica fragments took place between Catalunya (Spain), Mallorca (Spain) and Cyprus in July 2018 and were monitored until July 2019 (Fig. 1). Sea surface temperature data for each transplant site were based on daily SST maps with a spatial resolution of 1/4°, obtained from the National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI, https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oisst ) (Reynolds et al. 2007). These maps have been generated through the optimal interpolation of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data for the period 1981-2019. Underwater temperature loggers (ONSET Hobo pro v2 Data logger) were deployed at the transplant sites in Catalunya, Mallorca and Cyprus and recorded hourly temperatures throughout the duration of the experiment (one year). In order to obtain an extended time series of temperature at transplant sites, a calibration procedure was performed comparing logger data with sea surface temperature from the nearest point on SST maps. In particular, SST data were linearly fitted to logger data for the common period. Then, the calibration coefficients were applied to the whole SST time series to obtain corrected-SST data and reconstruct daily habitat temperatures from 1981-2019. Local climate data was also compared to the global thermal distribution of P. oceanica to assess how representative experimental sites were of the thermal distribution of the species (Supplementary materials). Collectively, seawater temperatures from the three locations span the 16th - 99th percentile of temperatures observed across the global thermal distribution of P. oceanica. As such Catalunya, Mallorca and Cyprus are herein considered to represent the cool-edge, centre and warm-edge of P. oceanica distribution, respectively. Transplantation took place toward warmer climates and procedural controls were conducted within each source location, resulting in six source-to-recipient combinations (i.e. treatments, Fig. 1). Initial collection of P. oceanica, handling and transplantation was carried out simultaneously by coordinated teams in July 2018 (Table S1). Each recipient location was subsequently resampled four times over the course of the experiment, in August/September 2018 (T1), October 2018 (T2), April 2019 (T3) and May/June 2019 (T4, Table S1). Between 60-100 fragments were collected for each treatment. A fragment was defined as a section of P. oceanica containing one apical shoot connected with approximately five vertical shoots by approximately 10-15 cm of rhizome with intact roots. Collection occurred at two sites within each location, separated by approximately 1 km. Within sites, collections were conducted between 4 – 5 m depth and were spaced across the meadow to minimise the dominance of a single clone and damage to the meadow. Upon collection, fragments were transported for up to one hour back to the nearest laboratory in shaded seawater. Handling methods In the laboratory, fragments were placed into holding tanks with aerated seawater, at ambient temperature and a 14:10 light-dark cycle. All shoots were clipped to 25 cm length (from meristem to the tip of the longest leaves), to standardise initial conditions and reduce biomass for transportation. For transport by plane or ferry between locations, fragments were packed in layers within cool-boxes. Each layer was separated by frozen cool-packs wrapped in wet tea towels (rinsed in sea water). All fragments spent 12 hrs inside a cool-box irrespective of their recipient destination, including procedural controls (i.e. cool-cool, centre-centre and warm-warm) to simulate the transit times of the plants travelling furthest from their source location (Fig. 1a). On arrival at the destination, fragments were placed in holding tanks with aerated seawater at ambient temperature as described above in their recipient location for 48 hrs, prior to field transplantation. Measurement methods One day prior to transplantation, fragments were tagged with a unique number and attached to U-shaped peg with cable-ties. Morphological traits for each fragment were measured and included: 1) length of the longest apical leaf, width and number of leaves 2) total number of bite marks on leaves of three vertical shoots per fragment, 3) number of vertical shoots, 4) leaf count of three vertical shoots per fragment and 5) overall horizontal rhizome length. A subset (n=10) of fragments per treatment were marked prior transplantation to measure shoot growth. To do this, all shoots within a single fragment were pierced using a hypodermic needle. Two holes were pierced side-by-side at the base of the leaf/top of the meristem. Transplant methods All transplant sites were located in 4 – 5 m depth in area of open dead-matte, surrounded by P. oceanica meadow. In Mallorca and Cyprus, fragments were distributed between two sites, separated by approximately 1 km. In Catalunya, a lack of suitable dead matte habitat, meant that all fragments were placed in one site. Fragments were planted along parallel transects at 50 cm intervals and with a 50 cm gap between parallel transects (Fig. S1). Different treatments were mixed and deployed haphazardly along each transect. Resampling methods and herbivory On day 10 of the experiment, a severe herbivory event was recorded at both warm-edge translocation sites. Scaled photos of all fragments were taken at this time to record the effects of herbivory on transplants. At the end of each main sampling period (T0 – T1, T1-T2 and T3 – T4), all pierced fragments were collected and taken back to the laboratory to measure shoot growth. At T1, T2 and T3, additional sets of fragments (n = 10 per treatment) were marked using the piercing method to record growth in the subsequent time period. In addition, at T1 and T3, n = 20 shoots within the natural meadow at each site were marked to compare growth rates between the native meadow and transplants. Underwater shoot counts and a scaled photo was taken to record fragment survivorship, shoot mortality, bite marks, and shoot length among all remaining fragments within each site and sampling time. In the laboratory, morphological measurements (described above) were repeated on the collected fragments and growth of transplant and natural meadow shoots was measured. Growth (shoot elongation, cm d-1) of the marked shoots was obtained by measuring the length from the base of meristem to marked holes of each leaf (new growth) of the shoot and dividing the leaf elongation per shoot by the marking period (in days). For each shoot, total leaf length (cm shoot-1) and the number of new leaves was also recorded. The rate of new leaf production (new leaves shoot-1 d-1) was estimated dividing the number of new leaves produced per shoot and the marking period. New growth was dried at 60 ºC for 48 hrs to determine carbon and nitrogen content of the leaves, and carbon to nitrogen (C:N) ratios. Carbon and nitrogen concentrations in the new growth leaf tissue was measured at the beginning of the experiment and each subsequent time point for each treatment. Nutrient analyses were conducted at Unidade de Técnicas Instrumentais de Análise (University of Coruña, Spain) with an elemental analyser FlashEA112 (ThermoFinnigan). Underwater photos of shoots were analysed using ImageJ software (https://imagej.net). Maximum leaf length on each shoot in warm-edge transplant sites (cool-warm, centre-warm and warm-warm) were recorded for the initial (day 10) herbivore impact, T1, T2 and T3 time-points and related to transplant nutrient concentrations. Herbivore impact was estimated as the proportional change in length of the longest leaf relative to initial length at T0. Thermal stress Long term maximum temperatures were recorded as the average of annual maximum daily temperatures in each transplant site, averaged between years from 1981-2019. Maximum thermal anomalies were calculated as the difference between daily temperatures in a recipient site over the course of the experiment and the long-term maximum temperature in the source site for each corresponding population. ‘Heat stress’ and ‘recovery’ growth periods of the experiment were defined as T0 -T2 (July-October) and T2-T4 (November-June), respectively, corresponding to periods of positive and negative maximum thermal anomalies. Thermal anomalies experienced by the different transplant treatments were plotted using the ‘geom_flame’, function in the ‘HeatwavesR’ package (Schlegel & Smit 2018) of R (version 3.6.1, 2019) . 1. The prevalence of local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity among populations is critical to accurately predicting when and where climate change impacts will occur. Currently, comparisons of thermal performance between populations are untested for most marine species or overlooked by models predicting the thermal sensitivity of species to extirpation. 2. Here we compared the ecological response and recovery of seagrass populations (Posidonia oceanica) to thermal stress throughout a year-long translocation experiment across a 2800 km gradient in ocean climate. Transplants in central and warm-edge locations experienced temperatures >29 ºC, representing thermal anomalies >5ºC above long-term maxima for cool-edge populations, 1.5ºC for central and <1ºC for warm-edge populations. 3. Cool, central and warm-edge populations differed in thermal performance when grown under common conditions, but patterns contrasted with expectations based on thermal geography. Cool-edge populations did not differ from warm-edge populations under common conditions and performed significantly better than central populations in growth and survival. 4. Our findings reveal that thermal performance does not necessarily reflect the thermal geography of a species. We demonstrate that warm-edge populations can be less sensitive to thermal stress than cooler, central populations suggesting that Mediterranean seagrasses have greater resilience to warming than current paradigms suggest. Australian Research Council, Award: DE200100900. Horizon 2020 Framework Programme, Award: 659246. Fundación BBVA. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Expósito N; Rovira J; Sierra J; Gimenez G; Domingo JL; Schuhmacher M;
    Country: Spain

    Microplastics (MPs) are accessible for organisms with active filter feeding strategies, as are many marine molluscs, which live attached or semi-buried in sediments. In the present study, MPs (from 0.02 to 5 mm) concentration, morphology, and composition were determined in consumed mollusc species of the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean Sea). Microplastic concentrations, morphologic characteristics and composition were studied according to species, catchment zones and depuration condition. Finally, human intake of MPs through molluscs' consumption was determined. >2300 individuals were analysed, being 1460 MPs extracted and their size, and polymeric composition registered. Big oysters and mussels showed the highest MPs concentration by individual, with levels of 22.8 ± 14.4 and 18.6 ± 23.0 MPs/individual, respectively. Mean annual MPs (≥20 μm) consumption for adult population was estimated in 8103 MPs/year, with a 95th percentile of 19,418 MPs/year. It suggests that the consumption of molluscs is an important route of MPs exposure for the Catalan population.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Raja, Maria; Rosell Melé, Antoni;
    Country: Spain

    Unidad de excelencia María de Maeztu CEX2019-000940-M This dataset contains supporting information for "Quantitative link between sedimentary chlorin and sea-surface chlorophyll-a". The dataset consists of global oceanic biogeochemical data from sea-surface, water column and surface sediments. The dataset includes sedimentary chlorin and sea-surface chlorophyll concentration, total organic carbon content, oxygen concentration and mass accumulation rate, among other biogeochemical parameters.