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The following results are related to European Marine Science. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
4,295 Research products, page 1 of 430

  • European Marine Science
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  • 2018-2022
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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frid, Ori;
    Publisher: Dryad

    The positive effect of fully protected Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) on marine biodiversity, specifically on fishes, has been widely documented. In contrast, the potential of MPAs to mitigate the impact of adverse climatic conditions has seldom been investigated. Here, we assessed the effectiveness of MPAs, quantified as increasing fish biomass, across wide geographic and environmental gradients across the Mediterranean Sea. We performed underwater visual surveys within and outside MPAs to characterize fish assemblages in 52 rocky reef sites across an extent of over 3,300 km. We used the steep spatial temperature gradient across the Mediterranean as a 'space-for-time' substitution to infer climate-driven temporal changes. We found that, as expected, Mediterranean MPAs increased fish biomass. At the same time, higher seawater temperatures are associated with decreased fish biomass, changes in species composition, and shifts towards more thermophilic species. Importantly, we found that the rate of decrease in fish biomass with temperature was similar between protected and fished sites. Taken together, these results suggest that the capacity of MPAs to harbor higher fish biomass, compared to surrounding areas, is maintained across a broad temperature range. At the same time, MPAs will not be able to offset larger-scale biotic alterations associated with climate change. Policy implications: Our results suggest that sustained warming will likely reduce fish biomass in the Mediterranean Sea and shift community structure, requiring more conservative targets for fishery regulations. At the same time, protection from fishing will remain an important management tool even with future high-water temperatures, and MPAs are expected to continue to provide local-scale benefits to conservation and fisheries.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Röhrs, Johannes;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Ocean drifters from oil-on-water exercise in North Sea (Frigg oil field) June 2019. Described in more detail in Brekke, C., Espeseth, M. M., Dagestad, K.-F., Röhrs, J., Hole, L. R., & Reigber, A. (2021). Integrated analysis of multisensor datasets and oil drift simulations - a free-floating oil experiment in the open ocean. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 126, e2020JC016499. https://doi.org/10.1029/2020JC016499 Work is funded by grant no. 237906 (CIRFA) of the Norwegian Research Council. Work is funded by grant no. 237906 (CIRFA) of the Norwegian Research Council

  • English
    Authors: 
    Zhijun XIA; Jianwei Wang;
    Publisher: Science Data Bank

    In April of 2007, field surveys of fish assemblages were conducted at 31 locations. Each sampling location was a 200-500 m stretch encompassing all types of geomorphological forms in the river channel (e.g. riffles, runs, and pools). Two commonly utilized electrofishing protocols were applied to maximize the capture of fish. Specifically, for shallow water locations, fish specimens were collected by means of backpack electrofishing. The crew sampled the reach in an upstream direction with two passes. For non-wadable areas, boat electrofishing was applied by moving the boat slowly in a downstream direction. All collected fish were identified to species level, measured, and weighed. Most individuals were released to the sampling sites, and a subset of fish species was fixed in 7% formalin for final preservation.Several environmental variables were recorded in situ after fish collection. Water temperature (℃), pH, dissolved oxygen (mgL-1), and conductivity (µScm-1) were measured by using a multi-parametric probe (WTW Multi 340i). Water depth (m) and channel width (m) were calculated using a depth sounder, and a Leica CRF900 rangefinder camera, respectively. An altimeter was used to measure altitude (m). Current velocity (ms-1) was determined using a flowmeter device. The percentage of substrate particle size was visually estimated and divided into four types: sand, silt, cobble, and boulder. File description:fish_abundance_data.csv31 sites (rows) × 62 species (columns) community matrix fish_trait_data.csv62 species (rows) × 9 functional traits (columns) matrix site_environment_data.csv31 sites (rows) × 12 environmental variables (columns) matrix fish_model_data.csvoccupancy, total mean abundance, niche position, niche breadth, trait vector 1, trait vector 2, trait vector 3, trait vector 4 and one phylogenetic vector for each fish species

  • English
    Authors: 
    Marra, John F.;
    Publisher: Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO)

    In situ primary productivity based on 14C assimilation and nutrients from samples collected by many research projects and on numerous cruises globally, 1985-2008.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Allgeier, Jacob;
    Publisher: Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO)

    These data are fish surveys from May to December 2021 following the construction of the clusters of artificial reefs. There are three clusters, each with 9 artificial reefs all of which are spaced the same distance and each differs per cluster (1 meter, 3 meters, and 5 meters). Reefs were constructed in less than 4 meters of water in the Bight of Old Robinson, on Abaco, The Bahamas.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lim, Jean; Thompson, Luke;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Reference datasets (Nov2022 update) for Mitohelper (https://github.com/aomlomics/mitohelper) Mitohelper is a repository built to facilitate experimental design, alignment visualization, and reference sequence analysis in fish eDNA studies. Refer to our paper and Mitohelper's wiki for database construction pipeline. I. Reference database files in tab-separated format, containing gene, taxonomy, and sequence information: mitofish.all.Nov2022.tsv (776,210 records) mitofish.12S.Nov2022.tsv (44,560 records) mitofish.12S.Nov2022_NR.fasta (fasta file of 12S rRNA gene records) mitofish.COI.Nov2022.tsv (314,143 records) II. De-replicated QIIME 2-compatible 12S/12S+16S+18S rRNA reference datasets: 12S-seqs-derep-uniq.qza 12S-tax-derep-uniq.qza 12S-16S-18S-seqs.qza 12S-16S-18S-tax.qza If you use Mitohelper, please cite: Jean Lim, S, Thompson, LR. Mitohelper: A mitochondrial reference sequence analysis tool for fish eDNA studies. Environmental DNA. 2021; 00: 1– 10. https://doi.org/10.1002/edn3.187 Major update: The 12S rRNA gene sequence dataset is now filtered to only contain mitochondrial genomes annotated with 12S rRNA gene sequences. Sequences of the 12S rRNA gene are now extracted from complete mitochondrial genomes to construct a more gene-specific 12S rRNA dataset. 12S rRNA gene sequences in mitohelper's dataset are available for download as mitofish.12S.Nov2022_NR.fasta

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dagmara Rusiecka;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Triple threat processes and/or other forcings can lead to changes in the ocean happening fast and abruptly. These changes, referred to as “tipping points”, are critical thresholds in a marine system that, when exceeded, can lead to a significant change in the state of the system, which often can be irreversible. This leaflet has been prepared mainly (but not only) for high school pupils with the financial support of Norges forskningsråd (Research Council of Norway) (309382).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Romero-Alvarez, Johana; Lupaşcu, Aurelia; Lowe, Douglas; Badia, Alba; Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Dorling, Steve; Reeves, Claire E.; Butler, Tim;
    Project: EC | ASIBIA (616938)

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) concentrations depend on a combination of hemispheric, regional, and local-scale processes. Estimates of how much O3 is produced locally vs. transported from further afield are essential in air quality management and regulatory policies. Here, a tagged-ozone mechanism within the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to quantify the contributions to surface O3 in the UK from anthropogenic nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from inside and outside the UK during May–August 2015. The contribution of the different source regions to three regulatory O3 metrics is also examined. It is shown that model simulations predict the concentration and spatial distribution of surface O3 with a domain-wide mean bias of −3.7 ppbv. Anthropogenic NOx emissions from the UK and Europe account for 13 % and 16 %, respectively, of the monthly mean surface O3 in the UK, as the majority (71 %) of O3 originates from the hemispheric background. Hemispheric O3 contributes the most to concentrations in the north and the west of the UK with peaks in May, whereas European and UK contributions are most significant in the east, south-east, and London, i.e. the UK's most populated areas, intensifying towards June and July. Moreover, O3 from European sources is generally transported to the UK rather than produced in situ. It is demonstrated that more stringent emission controls over continental Europe, particularly in western Europe, would be necessary to improve the health-related metric MDA8 O3 above 50 and 60 ppbv. Emission controls over larger areas, such as the Northern Hemisphere, are instead required to lessen the impacts on ecosystems as quantified by the AOT40 metric.

  • Research data . 2022 . Embargo End Date: 30 Aug 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Spatharis, Sofie;
    Publisher: Dryad

    Artificial light at night (ALAN) is increasingly recognised as a disruptive form of environmental pollution, impacting many physiological and behavioural processes that may scale up to population and community-level effects. Mounting evidence from animal studies show that the severity and type of the impact depends on the wavelength and intensity of ALAN. This knowledge has been instrumental for informing policy-making and planning for wildlife-friendly illumination. However, most of this evidence comes from terrestrial habitats, while research testing alternative wavelength illumination in marine environments is lagging behind. In this study we investigated the effect of such alternative ALAN colours on marine primary producers. Specifically, we tested the effect of green, red, and natural white LED illumination at night, compared to a dark control, on the growth of a green microalgae as well as the biomass, diversity and composition of a phytoplankton assemblage. Our findings show that green ALAN boosted chlorophyll production at the exponential growth stage, resulting in higher biomass production in the green algae Tetraselmis suesica. All ALAN wavelengths affected the biomass and diversity of the assemblage with the red and green ALAN having the stronger effects, leading to higher overall abundance and selective dominance of specific diatom species compared to white ALAN and the dark control. Our work indicates that the wavelength of artificial light sources in marine areas should be carefully considered in management and conservation plans. In particular, green and red light should be used with caution in coastal areas, where there might be a need to strike a balance between the strong effects of green and red light on marine primary producers with the benefit they bring to other organisms. This was a laboratory research work involving 4 ALAN treatments: dark, green, red, natural white. Two experiments were conducted: one with a single species Tetraselmis suesica and anothe with a natural coastal phytoplankton assemblage. Experiments were carried out concurrently for 14 days each and data was collected in growth rate, chlrophyl a and species diversity and composition. no missing values

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Muglia, Juan; Mulitza, Stefan; Repschläger, Janne; Schmittner, Andreas; Lembke-Jene, Lester; Mix, Alan; Saraswat, Rajeev; Sikes, Elizabeth; Waelbroeck, Claire; Gottschalk, Julia; +10 more
    Publisher: Zenodo

    In paleoceanography, carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios from benthic foraminifera are used as tracers of physical and biogeochemical properties of the deep ocean. We present the first version of the Ocean Carbon Cycling working group database, of stable isotope ratios of oxygen and carbon from benthic foraminifera from deep ocean sediment cores from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 23-20 ky before present (BP)) to the Holocene (<10 ky BP) with a particular focus on the early last deglaciation (20-15 ky BP). It includes 287 globally distributed coring sites, with metadata, isotopic and chronostratigraphic information, and age models. A quality check was performed for all data and age models. Sites with at least millennial resolution were preferred, because the main goal is to resolve ocean changes associated with the last deglaciation on at least millennial timescales. Software tools were produced to access and analyze the data, and are included with this publication. Deep water mass structure as well as differences between the early deglaciation and LGM are captured by the data in the compilation, even though its coverage is still sparse in many ocean regions. We find high correlations among time series calculated with different age models at sites that allow such analysis. The database provides a useful dynamical approach to map physical and biogeochemical changes of the ocean throughout the last deglaciation. Custom python scripts to read and analyse the data base may be found in https://github.com/juanmuglia/OC3-python-scripts

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to European Marine Science. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
4,295 Research products, page 1 of 430
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frid, Ori;
    Publisher: Dryad

    The positive effect of fully protected Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) on marine biodiversity, specifically on fishes, has been widely documented. In contrast, the potential of MPAs to mitigate the impact of adverse climatic conditions has seldom been investigated. Here, we assessed the effectiveness of MPAs, quantified as increasing fish biomass, across wide geographic and environmental gradients across the Mediterranean Sea. We performed underwater visual surveys within and outside MPAs to characterize fish assemblages in 52 rocky reef sites across an extent of over 3,300 km. We used the steep spatial temperature gradient across the Mediterranean as a 'space-for-time' substitution to infer climate-driven temporal changes. We found that, as expected, Mediterranean MPAs increased fish biomass. At the same time, higher seawater temperatures are associated with decreased fish biomass, changes in species composition, and shifts towards more thermophilic species. Importantly, we found that the rate of decrease in fish biomass with temperature was similar between protected and fished sites. Taken together, these results suggest that the capacity of MPAs to harbor higher fish biomass, compared to surrounding areas, is maintained across a broad temperature range. At the same time, MPAs will not be able to offset larger-scale biotic alterations associated with climate change. Policy implications: Our results suggest that sustained warming will likely reduce fish biomass in the Mediterranean Sea and shift community structure, requiring more conservative targets for fishery regulations. At the same time, protection from fishing will remain an important management tool even with future high-water temperatures, and MPAs are expected to continue to provide local-scale benefits to conservation and fisheries.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Röhrs, Johannes;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Ocean drifters from oil-on-water exercise in North Sea (Frigg oil field) June 2019. Described in more detail in Brekke, C., Espeseth, M. M., Dagestad, K.-F., Röhrs, J., Hole, L. R., & Reigber, A. (2021). Integrated analysis of multisensor datasets and oil drift simulations - a free-floating oil experiment in the open ocean. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 126, e2020JC016499. https://doi.org/10.1029/2020JC016499 Work is funded by grant no. 237906 (CIRFA) of the Norwegian Research Council. Work is funded by grant no. 237906 (CIRFA) of the Norwegian Research Council

  • English
    Authors: 
    Zhijun XIA; Jianwei Wang;
    Publisher: Science Data Bank

    In April of 2007, field surveys of fish assemblages were conducted at 31 locations. Each sampling location was a 200-500 m stretch encompassing all types of geomorphological forms in the river channel (e.g. riffles, runs, and pools). Two commonly utilized electrofishing protocols were applied to maximize the capture of fish. Specifically, for shallow water locations, fish specimens were collected by means of backpack electrofishing. The crew sampled the reach in an upstream direction with two passes. For non-wadable areas, boat electrofishing was applied by moving the boat slowly in a downstream direction. All collected fish were identified to species level, measured, and weighed. Most individuals were released to the sampling sites, and a subset of fish species was fixed in 7% formalin for final preservation.Several environmental variables were recorded in situ after fish collection. Water temperature (℃), pH, dissolved oxygen (mgL-1), and conductivity (µScm-1) were measured by using a multi-parametric probe (WTW Multi 340i). Water depth (m) and channel width (m) were calculated using a depth sounder, and a Leica CRF900 rangefinder camera, respectively. An altimeter was used to measure altitude (m). Current velocity (ms-1) was determined using a flowmeter device. The percentage of substrate particle size was visually estimated and divided into four types: sand, silt, cobble, and boulder. File description:fish_abundance_data.csv31 sites (rows) × 62 species (columns) community matrix fish_trait_data.csv62 species (rows) × 9 functional traits (columns) matrix site_environment_data.csv31 sites (rows) × 12 environmental variables (columns) matrix fish_model_data.csvoccupancy, total mean abundance, niche position, niche breadth, trait vector 1, trait vector 2, trait vector 3, trait vector 4 and one phylogenetic vector for each fish species

  • English
    Authors: 
    Marra, John F.;
    Publisher: Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO)

    In situ primary productivity based on 14C assimilation and nutrients from samples collected by many research projects and on numerous cruises globally, 1985-2008.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Allgeier, Jacob;
    Publisher: Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO)

    These data are fish surveys from May to December 2021 following the construction of the clusters of artificial reefs. There are three clusters, each with 9 artificial reefs all of which are spaced the same distance and each differs per cluster (1 meter, 3 meters, and 5 meters). Reefs were constructed in less than 4 meters of water in the Bight of Old Robinson, on Abaco, The Bahamas.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lim, Jean; Thompson, Luke;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Reference datasets (Nov2022 update) for Mitohelper (https://github.com/aomlomics/mitohelper) Mitohelper is a repository built to facilitate experimental design, alignment visualization, and reference sequence analysis in fish eDNA studies. Refer to our paper and Mitohelper's wiki for database construction pipeline. I. Reference database files in tab-separated format, containing gene, taxonomy, and sequence information: mitofish.all.Nov2022.tsv (776,210 records) mitofish.12S.Nov2022.tsv (44,560 records) mitofish.12S.Nov2022_NR.fasta (fasta file of 12S rRNA gene records) mitofish.COI.Nov2022.tsv (314,143 records) II. De-replicated QIIME 2-compatible 12S/12S+16S+18S rRNA reference datasets: 12S-seqs-derep-uniq.qza 12S-tax-derep-uniq.qza 12S-16S-18S-seqs.qza 12S-16S-18S-tax.qza If you use Mitohelper, please cite: Jean Lim, S, Thompson, LR. Mitohelper: A mitochondrial reference sequence analysis tool for fish eDNA studies. Environmental DNA. 2021; 00: 1– 10. https://doi.org/10.1002/edn3.187 Major update: The 12S rRNA gene sequence dataset is now filtered to only contain mitochondrial genomes annotated with 12S rRNA gene sequences. Sequences of the 12S rRNA gene are now extracted from complete mitochondrial genomes to construct a more gene-specific 12S rRNA dataset. 12S rRNA gene sequences in mitohelper's dataset are available for download as mitofish.12S.Nov2022_NR.fasta

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dagmara Rusiecka;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Triple threat processes and/or other forcings can lead to changes in the ocean happening fast and abruptly. These changes, referred to as “tipping points”, are critical thresholds in a marine system that, when exceeded, can lead to a significant change in the state of the system, which often can be irreversible. This leaflet has been prepared mainly (but not only) for high school pupils with the financial support of Norges forskningsråd (Research Council of Norway) (309382).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Romero-Alvarez, Johana; Lupaşcu, Aurelia; Lowe, Douglas; Badia, Alba; Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Dorling, Steve; Reeves, Claire E.; Butler, Tim;
    Project: EC | ASIBIA (616938)

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) concentrations depend on a combination of hemispheric, regional, and local-scale processes. Estimates of how much O3 is produced locally vs. transported from further afield are essential in air quality management and regulatory policies. Here, a tagged-ozone mechanism within the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to quantify the contributions to surface O3 in the UK from anthropogenic nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from inside and outside the UK during May–August 2015. The contribution of the different source regions to three regulatory O3 metrics is also examined. It is shown that model simulations predict the concentration and spatial distribution of surface O3 with a domain-wide mean bias of −3.7 ppbv. Anthropogenic NOx emissions from the UK and Europe account for 13 % and 16 %, respectively, of the monthly mean surface O3 in the UK, as the majority (71 %) of O3 originates from the hemispheric background. Hemispheric O3 contributes the most to concentrations in the north and the west of the UK with peaks in May, whereas European and UK contributions are most significant in the east, south-east, and London, i.e. the UK's most populated areas, intensifying towards June and July. Moreover, O3 from European sources is generally transported to the UK rather than produced in situ. It is demonstrated that more stringent emission controls over continental Europe, particularly in western Europe, would be necessary to improve the health-related metric MDA8 O3 above 50 and 60 ppbv. Emission controls over larger areas, such as the Northern Hemisphere, are instead required to lessen the impacts on ecosystems as quantified by the AOT40 metric.

  • Research data . 2022 . Embargo End Date: 30 Aug 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Spatharis, Sofie;
    Publisher: Dryad

    Artificial light at night (ALAN) is increasingly recognised as a disruptive form of environmental pollution, impacting many physiological and behavioural processes that may scale up to population and community-level effects. Mounting evidence from animal studies show that the severity and type of the impact depends on the wavelength and intensity of ALAN. This knowledge has been instrumental for informing policy-making and planning for wildlife-friendly illumination. However, most of this evidence comes from terrestrial habitats, while research testing alternative wavelength illumination in marine environments is lagging behind. In this study we investigated the effect of such alternative ALAN colours on marine primary producers. Specifically, we tested the effect of green, red, and natural white LED illumination at night, compared to a dark control, on the growth of a green microalgae as well as the biomass, diversity and composition of a phytoplankton assemblage. Our findings show that green ALAN boosted chlorophyll production at the exponential growth stage, resulting in higher biomass production in the green algae Tetraselmis suesica. All ALAN wavelengths affected the biomass and diversity of the assemblage with the red and green ALAN having the stronger effects, leading to higher overall abundance and selective dominance of specific diatom species compared to white ALAN and the dark control. Our work indicates that the wavelength of artificial light sources in marine areas should be carefully considered in management and conservation plans. In particular, green and red light should be used with caution in coastal areas, where there might be a need to strike a balance between the strong effects of green and red light on marine primary producers with the benefit they bring to other organisms. This was a laboratory research work involving 4 ALAN treatments: dark, green, red, natural white. Two experiments were conducted: one with a single species Tetraselmis suesica and anothe with a natural coastal phytoplankton assemblage. Experiments were carried out concurrently for 14 days each and data was collected in growth rate, chlrophyl a and species diversity and composition. no missing values

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Muglia, Juan; Mulitza, Stefan; Repschläger, Janne; Schmittner, Andreas; Lembke-Jene, Lester; Mix, Alan; Saraswat, Rajeev; Sikes, Elizabeth; Waelbroeck, Claire; Gottschalk, Julia; +10 more
    Publisher: Zenodo

    In paleoceanography, carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios from benthic foraminifera are used as tracers of physical and biogeochemical properties of the deep ocean. We present the first version of the Ocean Carbon Cycling working group database, of stable isotope ratios of oxygen and carbon from benthic foraminifera from deep ocean sediment cores from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 23-20 ky before present (BP)) to the Holocene (<10 ky BP) with a particular focus on the early last deglaciation (20-15 ky BP). It includes 287 globally distributed coring sites, with metadata, isotopic and chronostratigraphic information, and age models. A quality check was performed for all data and age models. Sites with at least millennial resolution were preferred, because the main goal is to resolve ocean changes associated with the last deglaciation on at least millennial timescales. Software tools were produced to access and analyze the data, and are included with this publication. Deep water mass structure as well as differences between the early deglaciation and LGM are captured by the data in the compilation, even though its coverage is still sparse in many ocean regions. We find high correlations among time series calculated with different age models at sites that allow such analysis. The database provides a useful dynamical approach to map physical and biogeochemical changes of the ocean throughout the last deglaciation. Custom python scripts to read and analyse the data base may be found in https://github.com/juanmuglia/OC3-python-scripts