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7,825 Research products, page 1 of 783

  • European Marine Science
  • Research data
  • Other research products
  • 2018-2022
  • European Marine Science

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Larson, Wes;
    Publisher: Dryad

    Freshwater mussels (family Unionidae) are among the world’s most endangered taxa, with almost 75% of North American taxa classified as a species of concern, threatened, or endangered. Despite the critical importance of comprehensive distributional data for the conservation of unionids and fishes, these data are often lacking because of the labor and resources associated with traditional survey methods. During their larval stage, unionid mussels use various fish species as obligate hosts, making native fish species vital to unionid persistence and an understanding of host distribution similarly important. Here, we utilized an eDNA metabarcoding approach to evaluate patterns of co-distribution of unionid mussels and fishes along ~362 km of the densely sampled Grand River network as well as the outlets of 19 tributaries along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan, USA. We detected a total of 21 mussel and 40 fish taxa, with distinctive composition of both mussel and fish assemblages across tributaries and differences in fish taxa between sampling periods. Notably, we detected more mussel taxa within the Grand River watershed than at the outlets of all 20 rivers combined. Within the Grand River network, two fish taxa (Pylodictus olivaris and Cyprinella) were found more frequently in areas of high mussel diversity, and three fish taxa more frequently in areas of low mussel diversity (Umbra, Leuciscidae, and Etheostoma). There was little difference between eDNA detections of mussels from samples collected in June versus August, but we detected significantly more fish taxa in August compared to June. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the value of eDNA metabarcoding for evaluating co-distribution of ecologically connected taxa. The use of eDNA as a tool for determining distributions of mussels and their obligate hosts may facilitate conservation efforts for these imperiled taxa. See manuscript.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    van Leeuwen, Stefan; Leenders, Liz; Hoogenboom, Ron; Nijrolder, Antoine;
    Publisher: Wageningen University & Research
    Country: Netherlands

    On behalf of the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality (LNV), Wageningen Food Safety Research (WFSR) analyses samples of agricultural products of animal origin for dioxins, PCBs, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and poly- and perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs). This includes meat, milk, eggs and fish. The samples are taken at the primary production or processing stage (e.g. in slaughterhouses or raw milk collection services). For dioxin-like compounds, 350 samples are screened first with the DR CALUX® method. Samples giving a signal indicating a level above the lowest action level are regarded as suspected. These samples are further examined using GC/HRMS as confirmatory method. Concerning fish, shellfish and crustaceans, approx. 25 samples are collected at sea by research vessels, at the fish auction, or from whole-sale traders (farmed fish).

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gazert, Volker; Luedecke, Cornelia;
    Publisher: Alfred-Wegener-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung
    Country: Germany
  • Authors: 
    Stefan van Leeuwen; Ron Hoogenboom; Antoine Nijrolder; Wim Traag; Jaap Immerzeel; Hanneke Brust; Caroline Dirks; Wouter A. Gebbink; Liz Leenders;
    Publisher: 4TU.ResearchData

    On behalf of the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality (LNV), Wageningen Food Safety Research analyses samples of agricultural products of animal origin for dioxins, PCBs, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and poly- and perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs). This includes meat, milk, eggs and fish.The samples are taken at the primary production or processing stage (e.g. in slaughterhouses or raw milk collection services). For dioxin-like compounds, 350 samples are first screened with the DR CALUX® method. Samples giving a signal indicating a level above the lowest action level are regarded as suspected. These samples are further examined using GC/HRMS as confirmatory method. Concerning fish, shellfish and crustaceans, approx. 25 samples are collected at sea by research vessels, at the fish auction, or from whole-sale traders (farmed fish).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frid, Ori;
    Publisher: Dryad

    The positive effect of fully protected Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) on marine biodiversity, specifically on fishes, has been widely documented. In contrast, the potential of MPAs to mitigate the impact of adverse climatic conditions has seldom been investigated. Here, we assessed the effectiveness of MPAs, quantified as increasing fish biomass, across wide geographic and environmental gradients across the Mediterranean Sea. We performed underwater visual surveys within and outside MPAs to characterize fish assemblages in 52 rocky reef sites across an extent of over 3,300 km. We used the steep spatial temperature gradient across the Mediterranean as a 'space-for-time' substitution to infer climate-driven temporal changes. We found that, as expected, Mediterranean MPAs increased fish biomass. At the same time, higher seawater temperatures are associated with decreased fish biomass, changes in species composition, and shifts towards more thermophilic species. Importantly, we found that the rate of decrease in fish biomass with temperature was similar between protected and fished sites. Taken together, these results suggest that the capacity of MPAs to harbor higher fish biomass, compared to surrounding areas, is maintained across a broad temperature range. At the same time, MPAs will not be able to offset larger-scale biotic alterations associated with climate change. Policy implications: Our results suggest that sustained warming will likely reduce fish biomass in the Mediterranean Sea and shift community structure, requiring more conservative targets for fishery regulations. At the same time, protection from fishing will remain an important management tool even with future high-water temperatures, and MPAs are expected to continue to provide local-scale benefits to conservation and fisheries.

  • Research data . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Centre for Earth Observation Science;
    Publisher: Canadian Watershed Information Network (CanWIN)

    Fish larvae collected via horizontal tows in the Hudson Bay system on the CCGS Amundsen in 2005, 2010, 2012, 2017 and 2018.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yates, Matthew;
    Publisher: Dryad

    Relating environmental DNA (eDNA) signal strength to organism abundance requires a fundamental understanding of eDNA production. A number of studies have demonstrated that eDNA production may scale allometrically – that is, larger organisms tend to exhibit lower mass-specific eDNA production rates, likely due to allometric scaling in key processes related to eDNA production (e.g. surface area, excretion/egestion). While most previous studies have examined intra-specific allometry, physiological rates and organism surface area also scale allometrically across species. We therefore hypothesize that eDNA production will similarly exhibit inter-specific allometric scaling. To evaluate this hypothesis, we reanalyzed previously published eDNA data from Stoeckle et al. (2021) which compared metabarcoding read count to organism count and biomass data obtained from trawl surveys off the New Jersey coast. Using a Bayesian model we empirically estimated the value of the allometric scaling coefficient (‘b’) for Northwestern Atlantic bony fishes to be 0.77 (credible interval = 0.64 – 0.92), although our model failed to converge for Chondrichthyan species. We found that integrating allometry significantly improved correlations between organism abundance and metabarcoding read count relative to traditional metrics of abundance (density and biomass) for bony fishes. Although substantial unexplained variation remains in the relationship between read count and organism abundance, our study provides evidence that eDNA production may scale allometrically across species in some contexts. Future studies investigating the relationship between eDNA signal strength and metrics of fish abundance could potentially be improved by accounting for allometry; to this end, we developed an online tool that can facilitate the integration of allometry in eDNA/abundance relationships. This is a curated dataset obtained from: Stoeckle, M.Y., Adolf, J., Charlop-powers, Z., Dunton, K.J., Hinks, G., and Vanmorter, S.M. 2021. Trawl and eDNA assessment of marine fish diversity, seasonality, and relative abundance in coastal New Jersey, USA. ICES J. Mar. Sci. 78(1): 293–304. doi:10.1093/icesjms/fsaa225. We separated Chondrichtyan and Osteichthyan species into separate datasets, including only species which were detected using eDNA. Values of 0.001 were added to 'zeroes' for abundance data, due to the inclusion of a heteroscedastic residual error term in some of the models.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    van Leeuwen, Stefan; Leenders, Liz; Hoogenboom, Ron; Nijrolder, Antoine;
    Publisher: 4TU.ResearchData
    Country: Netherlands

    On behalf of the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality (LNV), Wageningen Food Safety Research (WFSR) analyses samples of agricultural products of animal origin for dioxins, PCBs, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and poly- and perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs). This includes meat, milk, eggs and fish. The samples are taken at the primary production or processing stage (e.g. in slaughterhouses or raw milk collection services). For dioxin-like compounds, 350 samples are screened first with the DR CALUX® method. Samples giving a signal indicating a level above the lowest action level are regarded as suspected. These samples are further examined using GC/HRMS as confirmatory method. Concerning fish, shellfish and crustaceans, approx. 25 samples are collected at sea by research vessels, at the fish auction, or from whole-sale traders (farmed fish).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Röhrs, Johannes;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Ocean drifters from oil-on-water exercise in North Sea (Frigg oil field) June 2019. Described in more detail in Brekke, C., Espeseth, M. M., Dagestad, K.-F., Röhrs, J., Hole, L. R., & Reigber, A. (2021). Integrated analysis of multisensor datasets and oil drift simulations - a free-floating oil experiment in the open ocean. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 126, e2020JC016499. https://doi.org/10.1029/2020JC016499 Work is funded by grant no. 237906 (CIRFA) of the Norwegian Research Council. Work is funded by grant no. 237906 (CIRFA) of the Norwegian Research Council

  • English
    Authors: 
    Bravo, Miguel A.; Román, Isidro; Andreu, Ana C.; Arribas, Rosa; Márquez-Ferrando, Rocío; Díaz-Delgado, Ricardo; Bustamante, Javier;
    Publisher: DIGITAL.CSIC
    Country: Spain

    The monitoring of the fish community in Doñana wetlands was initiated in 2004 as part of the Monitoring Program of Natural Resources and Processes. The aim was to obtain a temporal and continuous series of data in the abundance and distribution of fish species to analyze the evolution of their numbers and estimates biodiversity values. Data were recorded annually between 2004-2019 by more than 2 members of the monitoring team which performed samplings in different locations twice per year in winter-spring and summer seasons when the study sites are flooded. The fishes were sampled at the 139 stations classified according to their location (on either aeolian sands or marshland). Funnel traps were used as a sampling method. Between 5-9 funnel traps were randomly distributed (until 50 cm of depth) in each location, depending of the flooded area and depth. The traps were left for 24 hours and emptied the content into white sorting pans. Individuals were counted and identified until the maximun taxonomic level in the field and realease. During samplings, it was identified 15 families. The most abundances were Poecilidae and Cyprinidae. Data recorded during the surveys included species identification, number of individuals, sex and life stage (pupa, larvae, inmature, mature) of the organisms when possible, as well as the time and georreferenced data of the observation. Between 2004-2007 data was registered in Excel file and since 2008 data was recorded in CyberTracker sequence). The protocol used has been supervised by researchers and the data have been validated by the members who performed the sampling. 1. Don_fish_ev_20221222: eventID, intitutionCode, institutionID, datasetName, eventDate, year, month, day, country, stateProvince, location, localityID, locality, decimalLatitude, decimalLongitude, habitat, sampleSizeUnit, sampleSizeEffort, DynamicPropiertiesEvent, eventRemarks, recordeBy.-- 2. Don_fish_occ_20221222: eventID, occurrenceID, individualCount, sex, lifeStage, kingdom, phylum, order, family, genus, specificEpithet, scientificName.-- 3. Don_fish_mof_20221222: OccurrenceID, measurementID, measurementType, measurementValue, measurementUnit, measurementMethod. Dataset are structured following well-established data formats. Three files are provided. The first file (Don_fish_ev_20221222) contains the information of each event (eventID, event date, geographical coordinates, sample effort, etc…); the second file (Don_fish_occ_20221222) contains the information of the occurrences of fish species recorded in each station, taxonomic classification; and the third file (Don_fish_mof_20221222) provide information of the biometric variable (weight) of fish sample in each occurrence. We acknowledge financial support from National Parks Autonomous Agency (OAPN) between 2002-2007; Singular Scientific and Technical Infrastructures from the Spanish Science and Innovation Ministry (ICTS-MICINN); Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, Fisheries and Sustainable Development from the Regional Government of Andalusia (CAGPDES-JA) since 2007; and Doñana Biological Station from the Spanish National Research Council (EBD-CSIC) since all the study period (2005). Peer reviewed

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
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Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
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arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to European Marine Science. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
7,825 Research products, page 1 of 783
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Larson, Wes;
    Publisher: Dryad

    Freshwater mussels (family Unionidae) are among the world’s most endangered taxa, with almost 75% of North American taxa classified as a species of concern, threatened, or endangered. Despite the critical importance of comprehensive distributional data for the conservation of unionids and fishes, these data are often lacking because of the labor and resources associated with traditional survey methods. During their larval stage, unionid mussels use various fish species as obligate hosts, making native fish species vital to unionid persistence and an understanding of host distribution similarly important. Here, we utilized an eDNA metabarcoding approach to evaluate patterns of co-distribution of unionid mussels and fishes along ~362 km of the densely sampled Grand River network as well as the outlets of 19 tributaries along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan, USA. We detected a total of 21 mussel and 40 fish taxa, with distinctive composition of both mussel and fish assemblages across tributaries and differences in fish taxa between sampling periods. Notably, we detected more mussel taxa within the Grand River watershed than at the outlets of all 20 rivers combined. Within the Grand River network, two fish taxa (Pylodictus olivaris and Cyprinella) were found more frequently in areas of high mussel diversity, and three fish taxa more frequently in areas of low mussel diversity (Umbra, Leuciscidae, and Etheostoma). There was little difference between eDNA detections of mussels from samples collected in June versus August, but we detected significantly more fish taxa in August compared to June. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the value of eDNA metabarcoding for evaluating co-distribution of ecologically connected taxa. The use of eDNA as a tool for determining distributions of mussels and their obligate hosts may facilitate conservation efforts for these imperiled taxa. See manuscript.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    van Leeuwen, Stefan; Leenders, Liz; Hoogenboom, Ron; Nijrolder, Antoine;
    Publisher: Wageningen University & Research
    Country: Netherlands

    On behalf of the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality (LNV), Wageningen Food Safety Research (WFSR) analyses samples of agricultural products of animal origin for dioxins, PCBs, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and poly- and perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs). This includes meat, milk, eggs and fish. The samples are taken at the primary production or processing stage (e.g. in slaughterhouses or raw milk collection services). For dioxin-like compounds, 350 samples are screened first with the DR CALUX® method. Samples giving a signal indicating a level above the lowest action level are regarded as suspected. These samples are further examined using GC/HRMS as confirmatory method. Concerning fish, shellfish and crustaceans, approx. 25 samples are collected at sea by research vessels, at the fish auction, or from whole-sale traders (farmed fish).

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gazert, Volker; Luedecke, Cornelia;
    Publisher: Alfred-Wegener-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung
    Country: Germany
  • Authors: 
    Stefan van Leeuwen; Ron Hoogenboom; Antoine Nijrolder; Wim Traag; Jaap Immerzeel; Hanneke Brust; Caroline Dirks; Wouter A. Gebbink; Liz Leenders;
    Publisher: 4TU.ResearchData

    On behalf of the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality (LNV), Wageningen Food Safety Research analyses samples of agricultural products of animal origin for dioxins, PCBs, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and poly- and perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs). This includes meat, milk, eggs and fish.The samples are taken at the primary production or processing stage (e.g. in slaughterhouses or raw milk collection services). For dioxin-like compounds, 350 samples are first screened with the DR CALUX® method. Samples giving a signal indicating a level above the lowest action level are regarded as suspected. These samples are further examined using GC/HRMS as confirmatory method. Concerning fish, shellfish and crustaceans, approx. 25 samples are collected at sea by research vessels, at the fish auction, or from whole-sale traders (farmed fish).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frid, Ori;
    Publisher: Dryad

    The positive effect of fully protected Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) on marine biodiversity, specifically on fishes, has been widely documented. In contrast, the potential of MPAs to mitigate the impact of adverse climatic conditions has seldom been investigated. Here, we assessed the effectiveness of MPAs, quantified as increasing fish biomass, across wide geographic and environmental gradients across the Mediterranean Sea. We performed underwater visual surveys within and outside MPAs to characterize fish assemblages in 52 rocky reef sites across an extent of over 3,300 km. We used the steep spatial temperature gradient across the Mediterranean as a 'space-for-time' substitution to infer climate-driven temporal changes. We found that, as expected, Mediterranean MPAs increased fish biomass. At the same time, higher seawater temperatures are associated with decreased fish biomass, changes in species composition, and shifts towards more thermophilic species. Importantly, we found that the rate of decrease in fish biomass with temperature was similar between protected and fished sites. Taken together, these results suggest that the capacity of MPAs to harbor higher fish biomass, compared to surrounding areas, is maintained across a broad temperature range. At the same time, MPAs will not be able to offset larger-scale biotic alterations associated with climate change. Policy implications: Our results suggest that sustained warming will likely reduce fish biomass in the Mediterranean Sea and shift community structure, requiring more conservative targets for fishery regulations. At the same time, protection from fishing will remain an important management tool even with future high-water temperatures, and MPAs are expected to continue to provide local-scale benefits to conservation and fisheries.

  • Research data . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Centre for Earth Observation Science;
    Publisher: Canadian Watershed Information Network (CanWIN)

    Fish larvae collected via horizontal tows in the Hudson Bay system on the CCGS Amundsen in 2005, 2010, 2012, 2017 and 2018.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yates, Matthew;
    Publisher: Dryad

    Relating environmental DNA (eDNA) signal strength to organism abundance requires a fundamental understanding of eDNA production. A number of studies have demonstrated that eDNA production may scale allometrically – that is, larger organisms tend to exhibit lower mass-specific eDNA production rates, likely due to allometric scaling in key processes related to eDNA production (e.g. surface area, excretion/egestion). While most previous studies have examined intra-specific allometry, physiological rates and organism surface area also scale allometrically across species. We therefore hypothesize that eDNA production will similarly exhibit inter-specific allometric scaling. To evaluate this hypothesis, we reanalyzed previously published eDNA data from Stoeckle et al. (2021) which compared metabarcoding read count to organism count and biomass data obtained from trawl surveys off the New Jersey coast. Using a Bayesian model we empirically estimated the value of the allometric scaling coefficient (‘b’) for Northwestern Atlantic bony fishes to be 0.77 (credible interval = 0.64 – 0.92), although our model failed to converge for Chondrichthyan species. We found that integrating allometry significantly improved correlations between organism abundance and metabarcoding read count relative to traditional metrics of abundance (density and biomass) for bony fishes. Although substantial unexplained variation remains in the relationship between read count and organism abundance, our study provides evidence that eDNA production may scale allometrically across species in some contexts. Future studies investigating the relationship between eDNA signal strength and metrics of fish abundance could potentially be improved by accounting for allometry; to this end, we developed an online tool that can facilitate the integration of allometry in eDNA/abundance relationships. This is a curated dataset obtained from: Stoeckle, M.Y., Adolf, J., Charlop-powers, Z., Dunton, K.J., Hinks, G., and Vanmorter, S.M. 2021. Trawl and eDNA assessment of marine fish diversity, seasonality, and relative abundance in coastal New Jersey, USA. ICES J. Mar. Sci. 78(1): 293–304. doi:10.1093/icesjms/fsaa225. We separated Chondrichtyan and Osteichthyan species into separate datasets, including only species which were detected using eDNA. Values of 0.001 were added to 'zeroes' for abundance data, due to the inclusion of a heteroscedastic residual error term in some of the models.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    van Leeuwen, Stefan; Leenders, Liz; Hoogenboom, Ron; Nijrolder, Antoine;
    Publisher: 4TU.ResearchData
    Country: Netherlands

    On behalf of the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality (LNV), Wageningen Food Safety Research (WFSR) analyses samples of agricultural products of animal origin for dioxins, PCBs, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and poly- and perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs). This includes meat, milk, eggs and fish. The samples are taken at the primary production or processing stage (e.g. in slaughterhouses or raw milk collection services). For dioxin-like compounds, 350 samples are screened first with the DR CALUX® method. Samples giving a signal indicating a level above the lowest action level are regarded as suspected. These samples are further examined using GC/HRMS as confirmatory method. Concerning fish, shellfish and crustaceans, approx. 25 samples are collected at sea by research vessels, at the fish auction, or from whole-sale traders (farmed fish).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Röhrs, Johannes;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Ocean drifters from oil-on-water exercise in North Sea (Frigg oil field) June 2019. Described in more detail in Brekke, C., Espeseth, M. M., Dagestad, K.-F., Röhrs, J., Hole, L. R., & Reigber, A. (2021). Integrated analysis of multisensor datasets and oil drift simulations - a free-floating oil experiment in the open ocean. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 126, e2020JC016499. https://doi.org/10.1029/2020JC016499 Work is funded by grant no. 237906 (CIRFA) of the Norwegian Research Council. Work is funded by grant no. 237906 (CIRFA) of the Norwegian Research Council

  • English
    Authors: 
    Bravo, Miguel A.; Román, Isidro; Andreu, Ana C.; Arribas, Rosa; Márquez-Ferrando, Rocío; Díaz-Delgado, Ricardo; Bustamante, Javier;
    Publisher: DIGITAL.CSIC
    Country: Spain

    The monitoring of the fish community in Doñana wetlands was initiated in 2004 as part of the Monitoring Program of Natural Resources and Processes. The aim was to obtain a temporal and continuous series of data in the abundance and distribution of fish species to analyze the evolution of their numbers and estimates biodiversity values. Data were recorded annually between 2004-2019 by more than 2 members of the monitoring team which performed samplings in different locations twice per year in winter-spring and summer seasons when the study sites are flooded. The fishes were sampled at the 139 stations classified according to their location (on either aeolian sands or marshland). Funnel traps were used as a sampling method. Between 5-9 funnel traps were randomly distributed (until 50 cm of depth) in each location, depending of the flooded area and depth. The traps were left for 24 hours and emptied the content into white sorting pans. Individuals were counted and identified until the maximun taxonomic level in the field and realease. During samplings, it was identified 15 families. The most abundances were Poecilidae and Cyprinidae. Data recorded during the surveys included species identification, number of individuals, sex and life stage (pupa, larvae, inmature, mature) of the organisms when possible, as well as the time and georreferenced data of the observation. Between 2004-2007 data was registered in Excel file and since 2008 data was recorded in CyberTracker sequence). The protocol used has been supervised by researchers and the data have been validated by the members who performed the sampling. 1. Don_fish_ev_20221222: eventID, intitutionCode, institutionID, datasetName, eventDate, year, month, day, country, stateProvince, location, localityID, locality, decimalLatitude, decimalLongitude, habitat, sampleSizeUnit, sampleSizeEffort, DynamicPropiertiesEvent, eventRemarks, recordeBy.-- 2. Don_fish_occ_20221222: eventID, occurrenceID, individualCount, sex, lifeStage, kingdom, phylum, order, family, genus, specificEpithet, scientificName.-- 3. Don_fish_mof_20221222: OccurrenceID, measurementID, measurementType, measurementValue, measurementUnit, measurementMethod. Dataset are structured following well-established data formats. Three files are provided. The first file (Don_fish_ev_20221222) contains the information of each event (eventID, event date, geographical coordinates, sample effort, etc…); the second file (Don_fish_occ_20221222) contains the information of the occurrences of fish species recorded in each station, taxonomic classification; and the third file (Don_fish_mof_20221222) provide information of the biometric variable (weight) of fish sample in each occurrence. We acknowledge financial support from National Parks Autonomous Agency (OAPN) between 2002-2007; Singular Scientific and Technical Infrastructures from the Spanish Science and Innovation Ministry (ICTS-MICINN); Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, Fisheries and Sustainable Development from the Regional Government of Andalusia (CAGPDES-JA) since 2007; and Doñana Biological Station from the Spanish National Research Council (EBD-CSIC) since all the study period (2005). Peer reviewed