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  • Biogeosciences (BG)

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  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Li Zhou; Dennis Booge; Miming Zhang; Christa A. Marandino;
    Country: Germany

    Climate-relevant trace gas air–sea exchange exerts an important control on air quality and climate, especially in remote regions of the planet such as the Southern Ocean. It is clear that polar regions exhibit seasonal trends in productivity and biogeochemical cycling, but almost all of the measurements there are skewed to summer months. If we want to understand how the Southern Ocean affects the balance of climate through trace gas air–sea exchange, it is essential to expand our measurement database over greater temporal and spatial scales, including all seasons. Therefore, in this study, we report measured concentrations of dimethylsulfide (DMS, as well as related sulfur compounds) and isoprene in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean during the winter to understand the spatial and temporal distribution in comparison to current knowledge and climatological calculations for the Southern Ocean. The observations of isoprene are the first in the winter season in the Southern Ocean. We found that the concentrations of DMS from the surface seawater and air in the investigated area were 1.03 ± 0.98 nmol−1 and 28.80 ± 12.49 pptv, respectively. The concentrations of isoprene in surface seawater were 14.46 ± 12.23 pmol−1. DMS and isoprene fluxes were 4.04 ± 4.12 µmol m−2 d−1 and 80.55 ± 78.57 nmol m−2 d−1, respectively. These results are generally lower than the values presented or calculated in currently used climatologies and models. More data are urgently needed to better interpolate climatological values and validate process-oriented models, as well as to explore how finer measurement resolution, both spatially and temporally, can influence air–sea flux calculations.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anja Engel; Theresa Barthelmeß;
    Country: Germany

    Surfactants can hamper gas exchange by up to 50 % in coastal seas; however, their small-scale temporal and spatial dynamics are poorly constrained. This study investigated possible biogenic sources of surfactants in the sea surface microlayer (SML) and the underlying water at a coastal Baltic Sea site. To relate surfactant dynamics to biogenic production, we conducted two field studies (June and September 2018) and focused on amino acids and carbohydrates as the main components of organic matter derived from phytoplankton. Furthermore the composition of the biochemicals provided insights into microbial degradation dynamics and was complemented by flow-cytometry-based community analysis. In total, 76 samples were collected within an area of approximately 50 km2, allowing for high spatial resolution. Moreover, morning and afternoon sampling enabled us to investigate diel cycles. Our results reveal that surfactant concentrations were tightly coupled to the abundance of nano-phytoplankton and generally higher in September than in June, with cell abundance 3 times higher. Surfactant concentration in June was best explained by the combined effect of the particulate fraction of the non-essential amino acid serine, the concentration of particulate combined carbohydrates (PCHO), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Surfactant and PCHO concentrations were significantly enriched in the SML and followed a pronounced diel cycle, possibly linked to microbial processing and/or photo-processing. In contrast to June, the surfactant pool in September correlated to a diverse mixture of semi-labile organic matter components, represented best by dissolved glucose and the essential amino acid isoleucine. We conclude that the surfactant pool in surface seawater is mainly composed of organic matter components that resist rapid microbial degradation. Elevated surfactant concentrations are triggered by the release of fresh organic matter. While the effect of the resistant but less surface-active stock is potentially longer-lasting, the additive effect of labile, highly surface-active agents on gas exchange may diminish on short timescales.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sonja Gindorf; Hermann W. Bange; Dennis Booge; Annette Kock;
    Publisher: Copernicus GmbH
    Country: Germany

    Abstract. Methane (CH4) is a climate-relevant atmospheric trace gas which is emitted to the atmosphere from coastal areas such as the Baltic Sea. The oceanic CH4 emission estimates are still associated with a high degree of uncertainty partly because the temporal and spatial variability in the CH4 distribution in the ocean surface layer is usually not known. In order to determine the small-scale variability in dissolved CH4 we set up a purge and trap system with a significantly improved precision for the CH4 concentration measurements compared to static headspace equilibration measurements. We measured the distribution of dissolved CH4 in the water column of the western Kiel Bight and Eckernförde Bay in June and September 2018. The top 1 m was sampled in high resolution to determine potential small-scale CH4 concentration gradients within the mixed layer. CH4 concentrations throughout the water column of the western Kiel Bight and Eckernförde Bay were generally higher in September than in June. The increase in the CH4 concentrations in the bottom water was accompanied by a strong decrease in O2 concentrations which led to anoxic conditions favourable for microbial CH4 production in September. In summer 2018, northwestern Europe experienced a pronounced heatwave. However, we found no relationship between the anomalies of water temperature and excess CH4 in both the surface and the bottom layer at the site of the Boknis Eck Time Series Station (Eckernförde Bay). Therefore, the 2018 European heatwave most likely did not affect the observed increase in the CH4 concentrations in the western Kiel Bight from June to September 2018. The high-resolution measurements of the CH4 concentrations in the upper 1 m of the water column were highly variable and showed no uniform decreasing or increasing gradients with water depth. Overall, our results show that the CH4 distribution in the water column of the western Kiel Bight and Eckernförde Bay is strongly affected by both large-scale temporal (i.e. seasonal) and small-scale spatial variabilities which need to be considered when quantifying the exchange of CH4 across the ocean–atmosphere interface.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kristian Spilling; Jonna Piiparinen; Eric P. Achterberg; Javier Arístegui; Lennart T. Bach; Maria T. Camarena-Gómez; Elisabeth von der Esch; Martin A. Fischer; Markel Gómez-Letona; Nauzet Hernández-Hernández; +3 more
    Country: Germany
    Project: AKA | Changing phytoplankton co... (259164)

    The Peruvian upwelling system is a highly productive ecosystem that could be altered by ongoing global changes. We carried out a mesocosm experiment off Peru, with the addition of water masses from the regional oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) collected at two different sites simulating two different upwelling scenarios. Here we focus on pelagic remineralization of organic matter by extracellular enzyme production of leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA). After addition of the OMZ water, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (N) was depleted, but the standing stock of phytoplankton was relatively high even after nutrient depletion (mostly >4 µg chlorophyll a L-1). During the initial phase of the experiment, APA was 0.6 nmol L-1 h-1 even though the PO43- concentration was >0.5 µmol L-1. Initially, the dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) decreased, coinciding with an increase in PO43- concentration probably linked to the APA. The LAP activity was very high with most of the measurements in the range 200–800 nmol L-1 h-1. This enzyme degrades amino acids and these high values are probably linked to the highly productive, but N-limited coastal ecosystem. Also, the experiment took place during a rare coastal El Niño event with higher-than-normal surface temperatures, which could have affected the enzyme production. Using a non-parametric multidimensional scaling analysis (NMDS) with a generalized additive model (GAM), we found that biogeochemical variables (e.g. nutrient and chlorophyll a concentrations), phytoplankton and bacterial communities explained up to 64 % of the variability in APA. The bacterial community explained best the variability (34 %) in LAP. The high hydrolysis rates for this enzyme suggests that pelagic N remineralization supported the high standing stock of primary producers in the mesocosms after N depletion.

  • Publication . Preprint . Other literature type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hanna Ingrid Campen; Hermann Werner Bange; Damian Leonardo Arévalo-Martínez;
    Country: Germany

    Carbon monoxide (CO) influences the radiative budget and oxidative capacity of the atmosphere over the Arctic Ocean, which is a source of atmospheric CO. Yet, oceanic CO cycling is understudied in this area, particularly in view of the ongoing rapid environmental changes. We present results from incubation experiments conducted in the Fram Strait in August/September 2019 under different environmental conditions: While lower pH did not affect CO production (GPCO) or consumption (kCO) rates, enhanced GPCO and kCO were positively correlated with coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and dissolved nitrate concentrations, respectively, suggesting microbial CO uptake under oligotrophic conditions to be a driving factor for variability in CO surface concentrations. Both production and consumption of CO will likely increase in the future, but it is unknown which process will dominate. Our results will help to improve models predicting future CO concentrations and emissions and their effects on the radiative budget and the oxidative capacity of the Arctic atmosphere.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Daniel J. Ford; Gavin H. Tilstone; Jamie D. Shutler; Vassilis Kitidis;
    Publisher: Copernicus GmbH
    Country: France

    The accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the atmosphere has been buffered by the absorption of CO2 by the global ocean, which acts as a net CO2 sink. The CO2 flux between the atmosphere and the ocean, which collectively results in the oceanic carbon sink, is spatially and temporally variable, and fully understanding the driving mechanisms behind this flux is key to assessing how the sink may change in the future. In this study a time series decomposition analysis was applied to satellite observations to determine the drivers that control the sea–air difference of CO2 partial pressure (ΔpCO2) and the CO2 flux on seasonal and inter-annual timescales in the South Atlantic Ocean. Linear trends in ΔpCO2 and the CO2 flux were calculated to identify key areas of change. Seasonally, changes in both the ΔpCO2 and CO2 flux were dominated by sea surface temperature (SST) in the subtropics (north of 40∘ S) and were correlated with biological processes in the subpolar regions (south of 40∘ S). In the equatorial Atlantic, analysis of the data indicated that biological processes are likely a key driver as a response to upwelling and riverine inputs. These results highlighted that seasonally ΔpCO2 can act as an indicator to identify drivers of the CO2 flux. Inter-annually, the SST and biological contributions to the CO2 flux in the subtropics were correlated with the multivariate El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index (MEI), which leads to a weaker (stronger) CO2 sink in El Niño (La Niña) years. The 16-year time series identified significant trends in ΔpCO2 and CO2 flux; however, these trends were not always consistent in spatial extent. Therefore, predicting the oceanic response to climate change requires the examination of CO2 flux rather than ΔpCO2. Positive CO2 flux trends (weakening sink for atmospheric CO2) were identified within the Benguela upwelling system, consistent with increased upwelling and wind speeds. Negative trends in the CO2 flux (intensifying sink for atmospheric CO2) offshore into the South Atlantic gyre were consistent with an increase in the export of nutrients from mesoscale features, which drives the biological drawdown of CO2. These multi-year trends in the CO2 flux indicate that the biological contribution to changes in the air–sea CO2 flux cannot be overlooked when scaling up to estimates of the global ocean carbon sink.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Laurent Bopp; Olivier Aumont; Lester Kwiatkowski; Corentin Clerc; Léonard Dupont; Christian Ethé; Thomas Gorgues; Roland Séférian; Alessandro Tagliabue;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Abstract. The impact of anthropogenic climate change on marine net primary production (NPP) is a reason for concern because changing NPP will have widespread consequences for marine ecosystems and their associated services. Projections by the current generation of Earth system models have suggested decreases in global NPP in response to future climate change, albeit with very large uncertainties. Here, we make use of two versions of the Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace Climate Model (IPSL-CM) that simulate divergent NPP responses to similar high-emission scenarios in the 21st century and identify nitrogen fixation as the main driver of these divergent NPP responses. Differences in the way N fixation is parameterised in the marine biogeochemical component PISCES (Pelagic Interactions Scheme for Carbon and Ecosystem Studies) of the IPSL-CM versions lead to N-fixation rates that are either stable or double over the course of the 21st century, resulting in decreasing or increasing global NPP, respectively. An evaluation of these two model versions does not help constrain future NPP projection uncertainties. However, the use of a more comprehensive version of PISCES, with variable nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratios as well as a revised parameterisation of the temperature sensitivity of N fixation, suggests only moderate changes in globally averaged N fixation in the 21st century. This leads to decreasing global NPP, in line with the model-mean changes of a recent multi-model intercomparison. Lastly, despite contrasting trends in NPP, all our model versions simulate similar and significant reductions in planktonic biomass. This suggests that projected plankton biomass may be a more robust indicator than NPP of the potential impact of anthropogenic climate change on marine ecosystems across models.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Olga Ogneva; Gesine Mollenhauer; Bennet Juhls; Tina Sanders; Juri Palmtag; Matthias Fuchs; Hendrik Grotheer; Paul J. Mann; Jens Strauss;
    Country: Germany

    Rapid Arctic warming accelerates permafrost thaw, causing an additional release of terrestrial organic matter (OM) into rivers, and ultimately, after transport via deltas and estuaries, to the Arctic Ocean nearshore. The majority of our understanding of nearshore OM dynamics and fate has been developed from freshwater rivers, despite the likely impact of highly dynamic estuarine and deltaic environments on transformation, storage, and age of OM delivered to coastal waters. Here, we studied OM dynamics within the Lena River main stem and Lena Delta along an approximately ∼1600 km long transect from Yakutsk, downstream to the delta disembogue into the Laptev Sea. We measured particulate organic carbon (POC), total suspended matter (TSM), and carbon isotopes (δ13C and ∆14C) in POC to compare riverine and deltaic OM composition and changes in OM source and fate during transport offshore. We found that TSM and POC concentrations decreased by 55 and 70 %, respectively, during transit from the main stem to the delta and Arctic Ocean. We found deltaic POC to be strongly depleted in 13C relative to fluvial POC, indicating a significant phytoplankton contribution to deltaic POC (∼68 ±6 %). Dual-carbon (∆14C and δ13C) isotope mixing model analyses suggested an additional input of permafrost-derived OM into deltaic waters (∼18 ±4 % of deltaic POC originates from Pleistocene deposits vs ∼ 5 ±4 % in the river main stem). Despite the lower concentration of POC in the delta than in the main stem (0.41 ±0.10 vs. 0.79 ±0.30 mg L-1, respectively ), the amount of POC derived from Pleistocene deposits in deltaic waters was almost twice as large as POC of Yedoma origin in the main stem (0.07 ±0.02 and 0.04 ±0.02 mg L-1, respectively). We assert that estuarine and deltaic processes require consideration in order to correctly understand OM dynamics throughout Arctic nearshore coastal zones and how these processes may evolve under future climate-driven change.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Laique M. Djeutchouang; Nicolette Chang; Luke Gregor; Marcello Vichi; Pedro M. S. Monteiro;
    Publisher: Copernicus GmbH
    Countries: France, Switzerland
    Project: EC | COMFORT (820989)

    The Southern Ocean is a complex system yet is sparsely sampled in both space and time. These factors raise questions about the confidence in present sampling strategies and associated machine learning (ML) reconstructions. Previous studies have not yielded a clear understanding of the origin of uncertainties and biases for the reconstructions of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO(2)) at the surface ocean (pCO(2)(ocean)). We examine these questions through a series of semi-idealized observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) using a high-resolution (+/- 10 km) coupled physical and biogeochemical model (NEMO-PISCES, Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean, Pelagic Interactions Scheme for Carbon and Ecosystem Studies). Here we choose 1 year of the model sub-domain of 10 degrees of latitude (40-50 degrees S) by 20 degrees of longitude (10 degrees W-10 degrees E). This domain is crossed by the sub-Antarctic front and thus includes both the sub-Antarctic zone and the polar frontal zone in the south-east Atlantic Ocean, which are the two most sampled sub-regions of the Southern Ocean. We show that while this sub-domain is small relative to the Southern Ocean scales, it is representative of the scales of variability we aim to examine. The OSSEs simulated the observational scales of pCO(2)(ocean) in ways that are comparable to existing ocean CO2 observing platforms (ships, Wave Gliders, carbon floats, Saildrones) in terms of their temporal sampling scales and not necessarily their spatial ones. The pCO(2) reconstructions were carried out using a two-member ensemble approach that consisted of two machine learning (ML) methods, (1) the feed-forward neural network and (2) the gradient boosting machines. The baseline data were from the ship-based simulations mimicking ship-based observations from the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT). For each of the sampling-scale scenarios, we applied the two-member ensemble method to reconstruct the full sub-domain pCO(2)(ocean). The reconstruction skill was then assessed through a statistical comparison of reconstructed pCO(2) cean and the model domain mean. The analysis shows that uncertainties and biases for pCO(2)(ocean) reconstructions are very sensitive to both the spatial and the temporal scales of pCO(2) sampling in the model domain. The four key findings from our investigation are as follows: (1) improving ML-based pCO(2) reconstructions in the Southern Ocean requires simultaneous high-resolution observations (<3 d) of the seasonal cycle of the meridional gradients of pCO(2)(ocean); (2) Saildrones stand out as the optimal platforms to simultaneously address these requirements; (3) Wave Gliders with hourly/daily resolution in pseudomooring mode improve on carbon floats (10 d period), which suggests that sampling aliases from the 10 d sampling period might have a greater negative impact on their uncertainties, biases, and reconstruction means; and (4) the present seasonal sampling biases (towards summer) in SOCAT data in the Southern Ocean may be behind a significant winter bias in the reconstructed seasonal cycle of pCO(2)(ocean). Biogeosciences, 19 (17) ISSN:1726-4170

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lutz Beckebanze; Benjamin R. K. Runkle; Josefine Walz; Christian Wille; David Holl; Manuel Helbig; Julia Boike; Torsten Sachs; Lars Kutzbach;
    Publisher: Copernicus GmbH
    Countries: Sweden, Germany

    Permafrost-affected soils contain large quantities of soil organic carbon (SOC). Changes in the SOC pool of a particular ecosystem can be related to its net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) in which the balance of carbon (C) influxes and effluxes is expressed. For polygonal tundra landscapes, accounts of ecosystem carbon balances in the literature are often solely based on estimates of vertical carbon fluxes. To fill this gap, we present data regarding the lateral export rates of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from a polygonal tundra site in the north Siberian Lena River delta, Russia. We use water discharge observations in combination with concentration measurements of waterborne carbon to derive the lateral carbon fluxes from one growing season (2 June–8 September 2014 for DOC, 8 June–8 September 2014 for DIC). To put the lateral C fluxes into context, we furthermore present the surface–atmosphere eddy covariance fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from this study site. The results show cumulative lateral DIC and DOC fluxes of 0.31–0.38 and 0.06–0.08 g m−2, respectively, during the 93 d observation period (8 June–8 September 2014). Vertical turbulent fluxes of CO2-C and CH4-C accumulated to −19.0 ± 1.2 and 1.0 ± 0.02 g m−2 in the same period. Thus, the lateral C export represented about 2 % of the net ecosystem exchange of (NEE) CO2. However, the relationship between lateral and surface–atmosphere fluxes changed over the observation period. At the beginning of the growing season (early June), the lateral C flux outpaced the surface-directed net vertical turbulent CO2 flux, causing the polygonal tundra landscape to be a net carbon source during this time of the year. Later in the growing season, the vertical turbulent CO2 flux dominated the NECB.