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623 Research products, page 1 of 63

  • European Marine Science
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • 2013-2022
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Research software . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frosini, Luca;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | PARTHENOS (654119), EC | D4SCIENCE (212488), EC | RISIS 2 (824091), EC | Blue Cloud (862409), EC | IMARINE (283644), EC | EUBRAZILOPENBIO (288754), EC | EGI-Engage (654142), EC | BlueBRIDGE (675680),...

    gCube Catalogue (gCat) API is a library containing classes shared across gcat* components. gCube is an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments, such as the D4Science Infrastructure, by favouring the realisation of reuse-oriented policies. gCube has been used to successfully build and operate infrastructures and virtual research environments for application domains ranging from biodiversity to environmental data management and cultural heritage. gCube offers components supporting typical data management workflows including data access, curation, processing, and visualisation on a large set of data typologies ranging from primary biodiversity data to geospatial and tabular data. D4Science is a Hybrid Data Infrastructure combining over 500 software components and integrating data from more than 50 different data providers into a coherent and managed system of hardware, software, and data resources. The D4Science infrastructure drastically reduces the cost of ownership, maintenance, and operation thanks to the exploitation of gCube. The source code of this software version is available at: https://code-repo.d4science.org/gCubeSystem/gcat-api/releases/tag/v2.0.0

  • Research software . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frosini, Luca;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914), EC | EUBRAZILOPENBIO (288754), EC | EGI-Engage (654142), EC | PARTHENOS (654119), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | D4SCIENCE-II (239019), EC | RISIS 2 (824091), EC | Blue Cloud (862409), EC | BlueBRIDGE (675680), EC | SoBigData (654024),...

    gCube Catalogue (gCat) Client is a library designed to interact with REST API exposed by the gCat Service. gCube is an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments, such as the D4Science Infrastructure, by favouring the realisation of reuse-oriented policies. gCube has been used to successfully build and operate infrastructures and virtual research environments for application domains ranging from biodiversity to environmental data management and cultural heritage. gCube offers components supporting typical data management workflows including data access, curation, processing, and visualisation on a large set of data typologies ranging from primary biodiversity data to geospatial and tabular data. D4Science is a Hybrid Data Infrastructure combining over 500 software components and integrating data from more than 50 different data providers into a coherent and managed system of hardware, software, and data resources. The D4Science infrastructure drastically reduces the cost of ownership, maintenance, and operation thanks to the exploitation of gCube. The source code of this software version is available at: https://code-repo.d4science.org/gCubeSystem/gcat-client/releases/tag/v2.4.0

  • Research software . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frosini, Luca;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | D4SCIENCE-II (239019), EC | EOSC-Pillar (857650), EC | SoBigData (654024), EC | D4SCIENCE (212488), EC | PerformFISH (727610), EC | AGINFRA PLUS (731001), EC | BlueBRIDGE (675680), EC | EUBRAZILOPENBIO (288754),...

    gCube Catalogue (gCat) Service allows any client to publish on the gCube Catalogue. gCube is an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments, such as the D4Science Infrastructure, by favouring the realisation of reuse-oriented policies. gCube has been used to successfully build and operate infrastructures and virtual research environments for application domains ranging from biodiversity to environmental data management and cultural heritage. gCube offers components supporting typical data management workflows including data access, curation, processing, and visualisation on a large set of data typologies ranging from primary biodiversity data to geospatial and tabular data. D4Science is a Hybrid Data Infrastructure combining over 500 software components and integrating data from more than 50 different data providers into a coherent and managed system of hardware, software, and data resources. The D4Science infrastructure drastically reduces the cost of ownership, maintenance, and operation thanks to the exploitation of gCube. The source code of this software version is available at: https://code-repo.d4science.org/gCubeSystem/gcat/releases/tag/v2.3.0

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Franco-Santos, Rita Melo; Auel, Holger; Boersma, Maarten; De Troch, Marleen; Graeve, Martin; Meunier, Cédric Léo; Niehoff, Barbara;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    The two experiments for which data is presented in this record were conducted in the context of RMFS' PhD work. The objective of the experiments was to quantify and qualify the effects of diet quality, herein manipulated in terms of different species (the diatom Conticribra weissflogii and the dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina) grown under different nutrient regimes (nutrient replete and Nitrogen-depleted), on the fatty acid (FA) assimilation and turnover of the copepod Temora longicornis. Experiments used field-collected copepods; sampling for experiments I and II took place on May 17th and 30th, 2016, respectively, with a 500 µm mesh-size CalCOFI net which was towed horizontally for 15 minutes at 5 m depth off the German island of Helgoland (54o11'N, 07o54'E), in the southern North Sea. Samples were immediately taken to the laboratory, where intact and active adult females were sorted under an Olympus SZX16 stereoscopic microscope. A total of 1260 females were sorted for each date, 1080 for the feeding experiment and 180 for the determination of in situ elemental and biochemical compositions. This study was conducted concomitantly with that from Franco-Santos et al. (2018). The feeding experiment was initiated after sorting, and lasted for five days. Females were distributed between triplicate 3L plastic beakers (75 females L-1), which were fitted with a 300 µm meshed-bottom cylinder, and kept in a dark, temperature-controlled room (10 ± 0.3oC, a temperature similar to that recorded in the surface water during sampling). Batch cultures of C. weissflogii were started on a daily basis (prior to starting the experiment) for five consecutive days; a stock solution was diluted with fresh f/2 medium (with and without nitrate additions, modified from Guillard, 1975), which contained 13C-enriched sodium bicarbonate (NaH13CO3, 4 mg L-1), and was grown for five days before being used to feed copepods (details in Franco-Santos et al., 2018). The same protocol was followed to culture the cryptophycean Rhodomonas salina, but bicarbonate was added to a concentration of 12 mg L-1. The algae were then used to feed the cultures of O. marina and, thus, create its different nutrient treatments. The dinoflagellate batches were cultured with the same protocol as the diatoms, except that the stock solution was diluted on a daily basis with labelled food (i.e., R. salina) rather than once at the start of the culture with isotopically-enriched medium. Cryptophycean cell quantities given to dinoflagellates were adjusted so that the former was depleted from the cultures on day 5. Diatom and dinoflagellate diets were provided for copepods ad libitum (> 350 µg C L-1; 8 and 2 * 103 cells mL-1, respectively) on a daily basis for five days. Cell density in the cultures was determined with a BD Accuri C6 Flow Cytometer. Beakers were gently stirred three times a day in order to resuspend dietary cells. Immediately before feeding copepods, a partial (approx. 65%) water exchange was conducted, which removed most of the food from the previous day. Copepods were sampled on days 1 (in situ composition, t0h), 3 (t48h), and 6 (t120h) of the experiment. Females were pooled into 10 and 50 individuals per replicate for elemental (body carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) contents and molar C:N ratio) and biochemical (total FA content and profile, and FA-specific content and 13C isotopic signal) analyses. Sampled copepods were gently washed in distilled water, then placed into pre-weighed tin capsules (5x9 mm, IVA Analysentechnik) or pre-combusted lipid vials (for elemental and FA analyses, respectively). Cultures were sampled daily during the experiment (after food was provided to copepods) for determination of cell elemental (C and N contents and molar C:N ratio) and biochemical (total FA content and profile, and FA-specific content and 13C isotopic enrichment) compositions. Subsamples of 5.2 and 0.4 *106 cells (for diatoms and dinoflagellates, respectively) were filtered through pre-combusted (500oC for 24h) Whatman GF/F filters (0.7 µm pore size, 25 mm diameter). Tin capsules and filters with samples for elemental analysis were dried at 60oC for 48 h; filters were folded inside tin foil, and both capsules and foil were stored in a desiccator until analysis. Filters with samples for FA analyses were placed into pre-combusted lipid vials, and vails containing both copepods and filters were stored at -80oC until analyses. The dry mass (DM) and C and N contents of samples were obtained as per Franco Santos et al. (2018). Lipid extraction (modified after Folch et al., 1957) and subsequent fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) quantification were performed as described in Franco-Santos et al. (2019) (and references therein). Temora longicornis does not have significant energy reserves and exhibits triacylglycerols (TAGs) as its primary neutral lipids (Fraser et al., 1989; Peters et al., 2013). Lipid classes were not separated in this study, and it was assumed that FAMEs were composed of TAGs. The FA-specific 13C isotopic composition of FAMEs was measured according to Boissonnot et al. (2016). Lipid C assimilation and turnover were calculated according to the equations used by Boissonnot et al. (2016) and Franco-Santos et al. (2019). Lipid C assimilation efficiency (AE), the percentage of (isotopically-enriched) dietary content ingested by copepods that was assimilated into FAs, was also calculated for (a) TFA, (b) saturation-specific sums of FAs (saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated FAs), and (c) each individual FA that was both available from the diet and assimilated by copepods (> 1% TFA in copepods). All the equations necessary for these calculations are described in the data sets contained in this bundled publication.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    CSIC - Departamento de Comunicación;
    Publisher: Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (España)

    Head of Communication: Abel Grau; Editorial board: Esther M. García Pastor, Alejandro Parrilla García; Writers: Lucía Casas Piñeiro, Isidoro García Cano, Esther M. García Pastor, Carmen Fernández, Ana Iglesias, Mónica Lara del Vigo, Silbia López de Lacalle, Víctor Lloret Blackburn, Alejandro Parrilla García, Belén Remacha; Photography: César Hernández, Álvaro Muñoz Guzmán, Joan Costa, Artur Martínez y Pau Franch; Translation: Fabiola Barraclough. This special issue of ‘CSIC Investiga. Journal of Science’ shows the performance of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) within the EU R&D framewok programme Horizon 2020. It presents reportages on research projects about Qur’an heritage in Europe, the exploration of Mars, the new robots that assist people, more efficient parasites controls in fishery, new sustainable packaging, methods to trace asymptomatic tuberculosis transmisión, and the historic legacy of the Senegal’s region of Pathiana, among others. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Thomas Münch;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | SPACE (716092)

    optimalcores is an R software project to analyse the temperature and isotope time series in an isotope-enabled climate model simulation; specifically, the ECHAM5/MPI-OM-wiso past1000 climate model run can be analysed, but also any other suited model run. The software is especially intended to determine optimal spatial sampling configurations for Antarctic ice cores which maximize the correlation with a target site temperature time series. Version 1.0.0 of the software is released along with the publication Münch, Werner and Laepple: How precipitation intermittency sets an optimal sampling distance for temperature reconstructions from Antarctic ice cores, Clim. Past, 17, 1587–1605, 2021.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    McClymont, Erin L; Bentley, Michael J; Hodgson, Dominic A; Spencer-Jones, Charlotte L; Wardley, Thomas; West, Martin; Croudace, Ian W; Berg, Sonja; Gröcke, Darren R; Kuhn, Gerhard; +3 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | ANTSIE (864637)

    Elemental scans, organic geochemistry and stable isotope analysis is presented here from a stomach-oil deposit collected at Lake Untersee in central Dronning Maud Land (DML). Deposit WMM7 (sometimes called Antarctic mumiyo) was collected at -71.367 degN, 13.317 degE during the GeoMaud expedition (1995/1996), from the Untersee Oasis, Dronning Maud Land. The aim of the analysis is to investigate snow petrel diet during the Last Glacial stage (22-29 ka) and in turn to infer changing sea-ice conditions in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean (McClymont et al., Climate of the Past Discussions, submitted). The data include results from non-destructive XRF scanning (ITRAX core scanner, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, U.K.), fatty acid distributions and fatty acid stable isotope ratios (Department of Geography, Durham University, Durham, U.K.) and bulk stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University, Durham, U.K.). The age-depth model is constrained by 6 new bulk radiocarbon measurements (CologneAMS, Cologne, Germany).

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Kamolphat, Atsawawaranunt; Comas-Bru, Laia;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: FCT | UID/MAR/00350/2013 (UID/MAR/00350/2013), EC | GC2.0 (694481)

    Files needed for Quality Control checks of the SISALworkbook_v12 (Comas-Bru and Harrison, 2019). This includes a Python script (wb_check_v12_compatible.py) for automatic checks and an R script (plot_agemodels_hiatus_v12) for manual checks. Instructions on how to run these scripts are provided in a README_instructions.txt file. See supplementary material of Comas-Bru et al (2020, https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-39) for further information on the checks.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bender, Maren; Mann, Thomas; Stocchi, Paolo; Kneer, Dominik; Schöne, Tilo; Illigner, Julia; Jompa, Jamaluddin; Rovere, Alessio;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    The sample set includes 25 newly sampled sea-level index points based on fossil microatoll measurements from 5 islands in the Spermonde Archipelago, 21 fossl microatoll samples previously published by Mann et al., 2016 from two Islands in the same study region and 20 marine and terrestrial limiting points (e.g. corals, shells and loamy clay) and one further sea-level index point from a Mangrove swamp published by De Klerk, 1982 and Tjia et al., 1972.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pape, Thomas; Haeckel, Matthias; Bohrmann, Gerhard;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    Concentrations of methane (headspace gas) in gravity cores and mini cores from the Kerch Seep area, Black Sea.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to European Marine Science. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
623 Research products, page 1 of 63
  • Research software . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frosini, Luca;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | PARTHENOS (654119), EC | D4SCIENCE (212488), EC | RISIS 2 (824091), EC | Blue Cloud (862409), EC | IMARINE (283644), EC | EUBRAZILOPENBIO (288754), EC | EGI-Engage (654142), EC | BlueBRIDGE (675680),...

    gCube Catalogue (gCat) API is a library containing classes shared across gcat* components. gCube is an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments, such as the D4Science Infrastructure, by favouring the realisation of reuse-oriented policies. gCube has been used to successfully build and operate infrastructures and virtual research environments for application domains ranging from biodiversity to environmental data management and cultural heritage. gCube offers components supporting typical data management workflows including data access, curation, processing, and visualisation on a large set of data typologies ranging from primary biodiversity data to geospatial and tabular data. D4Science is a Hybrid Data Infrastructure combining over 500 software components and integrating data from more than 50 different data providers into a coherent and managed system of hardware, software, and data resources. The D4Science infrastructure drastically reduces the cost of ownership, maintenance, and operation thanks to the exploitation of gCube. The source code of this software version is available at: https://code-repo.d4science.org/gCubeSystem/gcat-api/releases/tag/v2.0.0

  • Research software . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frosini, Luca;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914), EC | EUBRAZILOPENBIO (288754), EC | EGI-Engage (654142), EC | PARTHENOS (654119), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | D4SCIENCE-II (239019), EC | RISIS 2 (824091), EC | Blue Cloud (862409), EC | BlueBRIDGE (675680), EC | SoBigData (654024),...

    gCube Catalogue (gCat) Client is a library designed to interact with REST API exposed by the gCat Service. gCube is an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments, such as the D4Science Infrastructure, by favouring the realisation of reuse-oriented policies. gCube has been used to successfully build and operate infrastructures and virtual research environments for application domains ranging from biodiversity to environmental data management and cultural heritage. gCube offers components supporting typical data management workflows including data access, curation, processing, and visualisation on a large set of data typologies ranging from primary biodiversity data to geospatial and tabular data. D4Science is a Hybrid Data Infrastructure combining over 500 software components and integrating data from more than 50 different data providers into a coherent and managed system of hardware, software, and data resources. The D4Science infrastructure drastically reduces the cost of ownership, maintenance, and operation thanks to the exploitation of gCube. The source code of this software version is available at: https://code-repo.d4science.org/gCubeSystem/gcat-client/releases/tag/v2.4.0

  • Research software . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frosini, Luca;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | D4SCIENCE-II (239019), EC | EOSC-Pillar (857650), EC | SoBigData (654024), EC | D4SCIENCE (212488), EC | PerformFISH (727610), EC | AGINFRA PLUS (731001), EC | BlueBRIDGE (675680), EC | EUBRAZILOPENBIO (288754),...

    gCube Catalogue (gCat) Service allows any client to publish on the gCube Catalogue. gCube is an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments, such as the D4Science Infrastructure, by favouring the realisation of reuse-oriented policies. gCube has been used to successfully build and operate infrastructures and virtual research environments for application domains ranging from biodiversity to environmental data management and cultural heritage. gCube offers components supporting typical data management workflows including data access, curation, processing, and visualisation on a large set of data typologies ranging from primary biodiversity data to geospatial and tabular data. D4Science is a Hybrid Data Infrastructure combining over 500 software components and integrating data from more than 50 different data providers into a coherent and managed system of hardware, software, and data resources. The D4Science infrastructure drastically reduces the cost of ownership, maintenance, and operation thanks to the exploitation of gCube. The source code of this software version is available at: https://code-repo.d4science.org/gCubeSystem/gcat/releases/tag/v2.3.0

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Franco-Santos, Rita Melo; Auel, Holger; Boersma, Maarten; De Troch, Marleen; Graeve, Martin; Meunier, Cédric Léo; Niehoff, Barbara;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    The two experiments for which data is presented in this record were conducted in the context of RMFS' PhD work. The objective of the experiments was to quantify and qualify the effects of diet quality, herein manipulated in terms of different species (the diatom Conticribra weissflogii and the dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina) grown under different nutrient regimes (nutrient replete and Nitrogen-depleted), on the fatty acid (FA) assimilation and turnover of the copepod Temora longicornis. Experiments used field-collected copepods; sampling for experiments I and II took place on May 17th and 30th, 2016, respectively, with a 500 µm mesh-size CalCOFI net which was towed horizontally for 15 minutes at 5 m depth off the German island of Helgoland (54o11'N, 07o54'E), in the southern North Sea. Samples were immediately taken to the laboratory, where intact and active adult females were sorted under an Olympus SZX16 stereoscopic microscope. A total of 1260 females were sorted for each date, 1080 for the feeding experiment and 180 for the determination of in situ elemental and biochemical compositions. This study was conducted concomitantly with that from Franco-Santos et al. (2018). The feeding experiment was initiated after sorting, and lasted for five days. Females were distributed between triplicate 3L plastic beakers (75 females L-1), which were fitted with a 300 µm meshed-bottom cylinder, and kept in a dark, temperature-controlled room (10 ± 0.3oC, a temperature similar to that recorded in the surface water during sampling). Batch cultures of C. weissflogii were started on a daily basis (prior to starting the experiment) for five consecutive days; a stock solution was diluted with fresh f/2 medium (with and without nitrate additions, modified from Guillard, 1975), which contained 13C-enriched sodium bicarbonate (NaH13CO3, 4 mg L-1), and was grown for five days before being used to feed copepods (details in Franco-Santos et al., 2018). The same protocol was followed to culture the cryptophycean Rhodomonas salina, but bicarbonate was added to a concentration of 12 mg L-1. The algae were then used to feed the cultures of O. marina and, thus, create its different nutrient treatments. The dinoflagellate batches were cultured with the same protocol as the diatoms, except that the stock solution was diluted on a daily basis with labelled food (i.e., R. salina) rather than once at the start of the culture with isotopically-enriched medium. Cryptophycean cell quantities given to dinoflagellates were adjusted so that the former was depleted from the cultures on day 5. Diatom and dinoflagellate diets were provided for copepods ad libitum (> 350 µg C L-1; 8 and 2 * 103 cells mL-1, respectively) on a daily basis for five days. Cell density in the cultures was determined with a BD Accuri C6 Flow Cytometer. Beakers were gently stirred three times a day in order to resuspend dietary cells. Immediately before feeding copepods, a partial (approx. 65%) water exchange was conducted, which removed most of the food from the previous day. Copepods were sampled on days 1 (in situ composition, t0h), 3 (t48h), and 6 (t120h) of the experiment. Females were pooled into 10 and 50 individuals per replicate for elemental (body carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) contents and molar C:N ratio) and biochemical (total FA content and profile, and FA-specific content and 13C isotopic signal) analyses. Sampled copepods were gently washed in distilled water, then placed into pre-weighed tin capsules (5x9 mm, IVA Analysentechnik) or pre-combusted lipid vials (for elemental and FA analyses, respectively). Cultures were sampled daily during the experiment (after food was provided to copepods) for determination of cell elemental (C and N contents and molar C:N ratio) and biochemical (total FA content and profile, and FA-specific content and 13C isotopic enrichment) compositions. Subsamples of 5.2 and 0.4 *106 cells (for diatoms and dinoflagellates, respectively) were filtered through pre-combusted (500oC for 24h) Whatman GF/F filters (0.7 µm pore size, 25 mm diameter). Tin capsules and filters with samples for elemental analysis were dried at 60oC for 48 h; filters were folded inside tin foil, and both capsules and foil were stored in a desiccator until analysis. Filters with samples for FA analyses were placed into pre-combusted lipid vials, and vails containing both copepods and filters were stored at -80oC until analyses. The dry mass (DM) and C and N contents of samples were obtained as per Franco Santos et al. (2018). Lipid extraction (modified after Folch et al., 1957) and subsequent fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) quantification were performed as described in Franco-Santos et al. (2019) (and references therein). Temora longicornis does not have significant energy reserves and exhibits triacylglycerols (TAGs) as its primary neutral lipids (Fraser et al., 1989; Peters et al., 2013). Lipid classes were not separated in this study, and it was assumed that FAMEs were composed of TAGs. The FA-specific 13C isotopic composition of FAMEs was measured according to Boissonnot et al. (2016). Lipid C assimilation and turnover were calculated according to the equations used by Boissonnot et al. (2016) and Franco-Santos et al. (2019). Lipid C assimilation efficiency (AE), the percentage of (isotopically-enriched) dietary content ingested by copepods that was assimilated into FAs, was also calculated for (a) TFA, (b) saturation-specific sums of FAs (saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated FAs), and (c) each individual FA that was both available from the diet and assimilated by copepods (> 1% TFA in copepods). All the equations necessary for these calculations are described in the data sets contained in this bundled publication.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    CSIC - Departamento de Comunicación;
    Publisher: Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (España)

    Head of Communication: Abel Grau; Editorial board: Esther M. García Pastor, Alejandro Parrilla García; Writers: Lucía Casas Piñeiro, Isidoro García Cano, Esther M. García Pastor, Carmen Fernández, Ana Iglesias, Mónica Lara del Vigo, Silbia López de Lacalle, Víctor Lloret Blackburn, Alejandro Parrilla García, Belén Remacha; Photography: César Hernández, Álvaro Muñoz Guzmán, Joan Costa, Artur Martínez y Pau Franch; Translation: Fabiola Barraclough. This special issue of ‘CSIC Investiga. Journal of Science’ shows the performance of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) within the EU R&D framewok programme Horizon 2020. It presents reportages on research projects about Qur’an heritage in Europe, the exploration of Mars, the new robots that assist people, more efficient parasites controls in fishery, new sustainable packaging, methods to trace asymptomatic tuberculosis transmisión, and the historic legacy of the Senegal’s region of Pathiana, among others. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Thomas Münch;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | SPACE (716092)

    optimalcores is an R software project to analyse the temperature and isotope time series in an isotope-enabled climate model simulation; specifically, the ECHAM5/MPI-OM-wiso past1000 climate model run can be analysed, but also any other suited model run. The software is especially intended to determine optimal spatial sampling configurations for Antarctic ice cores which maximize the correlation with a target site temperature time series. Version 1.0.0 of the software is released along with the publication Münch, Werner and Laepple: How precipitation intermittency sets an optimal sampling distance for temperature reconstructions from Antarctic ice cores, Clim. Past, 17, 1587–1605, 2021.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    McClymont, Erin L; Bentley, Michael J; Hodgson, Dominic A; Spencer-Jones, Charlotte L; Wardley, Thomas; West, Martin; Croudace, Ian W; Berg, Sonja; Gröcke, Darren R; Kuhn, Gerhard; +3 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | ANTSIE (864637)

    Elemental scans, organic geochemistry and stable isotope analysis is presented here from a stomach-oil deposit collected at Lake Untersee in central Dronning Maud Land (DML). Deposit WMM7 (sometimes called Antarctic mumiyo) was collected at -71.367 degN, 13.317 degE during the GeoMaud expedition (1995/1996), from the Untersee Oasis, Dronning Maud Land. The aim of the analysis is to investigate snow petrel diet during the Last Glacial stage (22-29 ka) and in turn to infer changing sea-ice conditions in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean (McClymont et al., Climate of the Past Discussions, submitted). The data include results from non-destructive XRF scanning (ITRAX core scanner, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, U.K.), fatty acid distributions and fatty acid stable isotope ratios (Department of Geography, Durham University, Durham, U.K.) and bulk stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University, Durham, U.K.). The age-depth model is constrained by 6 new bulk radiocarbon measurements (CologneAMS, Cologne, Germany).

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Kamolphat, Atsawawaranunt; Comas-Bru, Laia;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: FCT | UID/MAR/00350/2013 (UID/MAR/00350/2013), EC | GC2.0 (694481)

    Files needed for Quality Control checks of the SISALworkbook_v12 (Comas-Bru and Harrison, 2019). This includes a Python script (wb_check_v12_compatible.py) for automatic checks and an R script (plot_agemodels_hiatus_v12) for manual checks. Instructions on how to run these scripts are provided in a README_instructions.txt file. See supplementary material of Comas-Bru et al (2020, https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2020-39) for further information on the checks.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bender, Maren; Mann, Thomas; Stocchi, Paolo; Kneer, Dominik; Schöne, Tilo; Illigner, Julia; Jompa, Jamaluddin; Rovere, Alessio;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    The sample set includes 25 newly sampled sea-level index points based on fossil microatoll measurements from 5 islands in the Spermonde Archipelago, 21 fossl microatoll samples previously published by Mann et al., 2016 from two Islands in the same study region and 20 marine and terrestrial limiting points (e.g. corals, shells and loamy clay) and one further sea-level index point from a Mangrove swamp published by De Klerk, 1982 and Tjia et al., 1972.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pape, Thomas; Haeckel, Matthias; Bohrmann, Gerhard;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science

    Concentrations of methane (headspace gas) in gravity cores and mini cores from the Kerch Seep area, Black Sea.