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132 Research products, page 1 of 14

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Paschen, Marius;
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | OceanNETs (869357)

    This software implements numerically different carbon accounting schemes regarding ocean-based negative emission technologies by using the R software.

  • Research software . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Schlitzer, Reiner;
    Publisher: https://odv.awi.de/
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | SeaDataCloud (730960)

    Ocean Data View (ODV) is a software package for the interactive exploration, analysis and visualization of oceanographic and other geo-referenced profile, time-series, trajectory or sequence data. ODV runs on Windows, macOS, Linux, and UNIX (Solaris, Irix, AIX) systems. ODV data and configuration files are platform-independent and can be exchanged between different systems. ODV can display original data points or gridded fields based on the original data. ODV has two fast weighted-averaging gridding algorithms as well as the advanced DIVA gridding software built-in. Gridded fields can be color-shaded and/or contoured. ODV supports five different map projections and can be used to produce high quality cruise maps. ODV graphics output can be send directly to printers or may be exported to PostScript, gif, png, or jpg files. The resolution of exported graphics files is specified by the user and not limited by the pixel resolution of the screen. ODV is available for download at https://odv.awi.de/.

  • Other research product . Collection . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ehlert von Ahn, Cátia Milene; Böttcher, Michael Ernst; Dellwig, Olaf; Schmiedinger, Iris; Scholten, Jan Christoph;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | SGDBALTIC (293499)

    Short sediment cores were taken at six stations in Wismar Bay, southern Baltic Sea (Germany) in May 2019 using a Rumohr-Lot device. Our aim in this study was to investigate the role of diagenetic element fluxes and different fresh water sources, including submarine groundwater discharge, on the water column in the bay. Porewaters were extracted from the sediment cores by applying the rhizon technique at a resolution between 2 and 5 cm. The porewaters were analyzed for major and trace metals and selected nutrients using a ICP-OES (iCAP, 7400, Duo Thermo Fischer Scientific), total sulphide by a Specord 40 spectrophotometer (Analytik Jena), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and δ13CDIC using an isotope gas mass spectrometre (MAT 253) coupled to a Gasbench II, and δ18OH2O, and δ2HH2O using a CRDS system (laser cavity-ring-down-spectroscopy, Picarro L2140- I). Sediment cores were further sliced at 2 to 4 cm resolution and each freeze-dried solid subsample was analyzed for contents of total carbon, nitrogen, and sulphur using an Elemental Analyzer (Euro Vector EuroEA 3, 052), inorganic carbon using an Elemental Analyzer multi EA (Analytik Jena), total mercury by a DMA-80 analyzer, and HCl-extractable Pb, Mn and Fe using an ICP-OES (iCAP, 7400, Duo Thermo Fischer Scientific).

  • Research software . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Christmann, Julia; Rückamp, Martin; Müller, Ralf; Humbert, Angelika;
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | ERA-PLANET (689443)

    Viscoelastic COMSOL COMice-ve.mph for manuscript entitled "Elastic deformation plays a non-negligible role in Greenland’s outlet glacier flow" from Christmann et al., Communications Earth & Environment, https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-021-00296-3, 2021. You can find here the mph file and all external data used in the finite element Comsol mph file. These files are also accessible via GitLab: https://gitlab.awi.de/jchristm/viscoelastic-79ng-greenland.git.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Strauss, Jens; Abbott, Benjamin; Hugelius, Gustaf; Schuur, Edward. A. G.; Treat, Claire; Fuchs, Matthias; Schädel, Christina; Ulrich, Mathias; Turetsky, M. R.; Keuschnig, Markus; +3 more
    Publisher: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | PETA-CARB (338335)

    Permafrost is perennially frozen ground, such as soil, rock, and ice. In permafrost regions, plant and microbial life persists primarily in the near-surface soil that thaws every summer, called the ‘active layer’ (Figure 20). The cold and wet conditions in many permafrost regions limit decomposition of organic matter. In combination with soil mixing processes caused by repeated freezing and thawing, this has led to the accumulation of large stocks of soil organic carbon in the permafrost zone over multi-millennial timescales. As the climate warms, permafrost carbon could be highly vulnerable to climatic warming. Permafrost occurs primarily in high latitudes (e.g. Arctic and Antarctic) and at high elevation (e.g. Tibetan Plateau, Figure 21). The thickness of permafrost varies from less than 1 m (in boreal peatlands) to more than 1 500 m (in Yakutia). The coldest permafrost is found in the Transantarctic Mountains in Antarctica (−36°C) and in northern Canada for the Northern Hemisphere (-15°C; Obu et al., 2019, 2020). In contrast, some of the warmest permafrost occurs in peatlands in areas with mean air temperatures above 0°C. Here permafrost exists because thick peat layers insulate the ground during the summer. Most of the permafrost existing today formed during cold glacials (e.g. before 12 000 years ago) and has persisted through warmer interglacials. Some shallow permafrost (max 30–70m depth) formed during the Holocene (past 5000 years) and some even during the Little Ice Age from 400–150 years ago. There are few extensive regions suitable for row crop agriculture in the permafrost zone. Additionally, in areas where large-scale agriculture has been conducted, ground destabilization has been common. Surface disturbance such as plowing or trampling of vegetation can alter the thermal regime of the soil, potentially triggering surface subsidence or abrupt collapse. This may influence soil hydrology, nutrient cycling, and organic matter storage. These changes often have acute and negative consequences for continued agricultural use of such landscapes. Thus, row-crop agriculture could have a negative impact on permafrost (e.g. Grünzweig et al., 2014). Conversely, animal husbandry is widespread in the permafrost zone, including horses, cattle, and reindeer.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stuenzi, Simone Maria; Kruse, Stefan; Boike, Julia; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Westermann, Sebastian; Langer, Moritz;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | GlacialLegacy (772852), EC | GlacialLegacy (772852)

    CryoGrid is a land-surface scheme dedicated to modeling of ground temperatures in permafrost environments. Here, the one-dimensional land surface model (CryoGrid) is adapted for application in vegetated areas by coupling a multilayer canopy model (CLM-ml v0). This model setup is used to reproduce the energy transfer and thermal regime at a study site in mixed boreal forest in Eastern Siberia. The vegetation module forms the upper boundary layer of the coupled vegetation-permafrost model and replaces the surface energy balance equation used for common CryoGrid representations. The coupled model was first described in the following article which has been published in Biogeosciences: Stuenzi, S. M., Boike, J., Cable, W., Herzschuh, U., Kruse, S., Pestryakova, L. A., Schneider von Deimling, T., Westermann, S., Zakharov, E. S., and Langer, M.: Variability of the surface energy balance in permafrost-underlain boreal forest, Biogeosciences, 18, 343–365, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-343-2021, 2021. The model code for this publication can be found here: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4317106 In a second publication, the model has been extended by a parameterization for deciduous forest to simulate the leafless state of deciduous-dominated regions outside of the short vegetative period in summer. A more realistic canopy structure is simulated by allowing fractional composition of deciduous and evergreen taxa within the simulated forest stand. Further, we have implemented a new relationship for phase partitioning of water in frozen soil (freeze curve): Stuenzi, S. M., Boike, J., Gädeke, A., Herzschuh, U., Kruse, S., Pestryakova, L. A., Westermann, S., and Langer, M. (2021). Sensitivity of ecosystem-protected permafrost under changing boreal forest structures. Environmental Research Letters, 16(8), 084045. https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/AC153D. The model code for this publication can be found here: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4603668. Here, we have added the possibility to couple our model to a dynamic larch vegetation simulator (LAVESI). LAVESI is publicly available on GitHub at https://github.com/StefanKruse/LAVESI the branch used for this study is https://github.com/StefanKruse/LAVESI/tree/CryoGrid_multispecies and the commit used for the simulations for this study is 93a9767. The final commit will be permanently stored on Zenodo. The parameters are set to the default values that were used for the simulations in the article. Parameters different from the default values can be specified in the main script run_CG_RUN_1D_STANDARD.m (general parameters, run number, etc.) and in the excel table \results\test_vegetation_snow_1\ test_vegetation_snow_1.xlsx (run-specific parameters). To start the program, run the script run_CG_RUN_1D_STANDARD.m. The default output directory is .\results\. Further updates to the model code can be found here: https://github.com/CryoGrid/CryoGrid/tree/vegetation Updates and documentation of the Permafrost model CryoGrid can be found here: https://github.com/CryoGrid. The model is further described in this publication: Westermann, S., Langer, M., Boike, J., Heikenfeld, M., Peter, M., Etzelmüller, B., & Krinner, G. (2016). Simulating the thermal regime and thaw processes of ice-rich permafrost ground with the land-surface model CryoGrid 3. Geosci. Model Dev., 9(2), 523–546. https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-9-523-2016. The multilayer canopy model was first published by Bonan et al. (2018): Bonan, G. B., Patton, E. G., Harman, I. N., Oleson, K. W., Finnigan, J. J., Lu, Y., and Burakowski, E. A.: Modeling canopy-induced turbulence in the Earth system: a unified parameterization of turbulent exchange within plant canopies and the roughness sublayer (CLM-ml v0), Geosci. Model Dev., 11, 1467–1496, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-11-1467-2018, 2018. {"references": ["Stuenzi, S. M., Boike, J., Cable, W., Herzschuh, U., Kruse, S., Pestryakova, L. A., Schneider von Deimling, T., Westermann, S., Zakharov, E. S., and Langer, M.: Variability of the surface energy balance in permafrost-underlain boreal forest, Biogeosciences, 18, 343\u2013365, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-343-2021, 2021. The model code for this publication can be found here: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4317106", "Westermann, S., Langer, M., Boike, J., Heikenfeld, M., Peter, M., Etzelm\u00fcller, B., & Krinner, G. (2016). Simulating the thermal regime and thaw processes of ice-rich permafrost ground with the land-surface model CryoGrid 3.\u00a0Geosci. Model Dev., 9(2), 523\u2013546.\u00a0https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-9-523-2016.", "Bonan, G. B., Patton, E. G., Harman, I. N., Oleson, K. W., Finnigan, J. J., Lu, Y., and Burakowski, E. A.: Modeling canopy-induced turbulence in the Earth system: a unified parameterization of turbulent exchange within plant canopies and the roughness sublayer (CLM-ml v0), Geosci. Model Dev., 11, 1467\u20131496, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-11-1467-2018, 2018.", "Stuenzi, S.M., Boike, J., G\u00e4decke, A., Herzschuh, U., Kruse, S., Pestryakova, L.A., Westermann, S., Langer, M. (2021). Sensitivity of ecosystem-protected permafrost under changing boreal forest structures. Environmental Research Letters. https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/ac153d"]}

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stolpmann, Lydia; Coch, Caroline; Morgenstern, Anne; Boike, Julia; Fritz, Michael; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Stoof-Leichsenring, Kathleen; Dvornikov, Yury; Heim, Birgit; Lenz, Josefine; +5 more
    Project: EC | PETA-CARB (338335)

    Lakes in permafrost regions are dynamic landscape components and play an important role for climate change feedbacks. Lake processes such as mineralization and flocculation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), one of the main carbon fractions in lakes, contribute to the greenhouse effect and are part of the global carbon cycle. These processes are in the focus of climate research, but studies so far are limited to specific study regions. In our synthesis, we analyzed 2167 water samples from 1833 lakes across the Arctic in permafrost regions of Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Siberia to provide first pan-Arctic insights for linkages between DOC concentrations and the environment. Using published data and unpublished datasets from the author team, we report regional DOC differences linked to latitude, permafrost zones, ecoregions, geology, near-surface soil organic carbon contents, and ground ice classification of each lake region. The lake DOC concentrations in our dataset range from 0 to 1130 mg L−1 (10.8 mg L−1 median DOC concentration). Regarding the permafrost regions of our synthesis, we found median lake DOC concentrations of 12.4 mg L−1 (Siberia), 12.3 mg L−1 (Alaska), 10.3 mg L−1 (Greenland), and 4.5 mg L−1 (Canada). Our synthesis shows a significant relationship between lake DOC concentration and lake ecoregion. We found higher lake DOC concentrations at boreal permafrost sites compared to tundra sites. We found significantly higher DOC concentrations in lakes in regions with ice-rich syngenetic permafrost deposits (yedoma) compared to non-yedoma lakes and a weak but significant relationship between soil organic carbon content and lake DOC concentration as well as between ground ice content and lake DOC. Our pan-Arctic dataset shows that the DOC concentration of a lake depends on its environmental properties, especially on permafrost extent and ecoregion, as well as vegetation, which is the most important driver of lake DOC in this study. This new dataset will be fundamental to quantify a pan-Arctic lake DOC pool for estimations of the impact of lake DOC on the global carbon cycle and climate change.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stuenzi, Simone Maria; Boike, Julia; Gädeke, Anne; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Kruse, Stefan; Pestryakova, Luidmila A.; Westermann, Sebastian; Langer, Moritz;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | GlacialLegacy (772852), EC | GlacialLegacy (772852)

    CryoGrid is a land-surface scheme dedicated to modeling of ground temperatures in permafrost environments. Here, the one-dimensional land surface model (CryoGrid) is adapted for application in vegetated areas by coupling a multilayer canopy model (CLM-ml v0). This model setup is used to reproduce the energy transfer and thermal regime at a study site in mixed boreal forest in Eastern Siberia. The vegetation module forms the upper boundary layer of the coupled vegetation-permafrost model and replaces the surface energy balance equation used for common CryoGrid representations. The coupled model was first described in the following article which has been published in Biogeosciences: Stuenzi, S. M., Boike, J., Cable, W., Herzschuh, U., Kruse, S., Pestryakova, L. A., Schneider von Deimling, T., Westermann, S., Zakharov, E. S., and Langer, M.: Variability of the surface energy balance in permafrost-underlain boreal forest, Biogeosciences, 18, 343–365, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-343-2021, 2021. The model code for this publication can be found here: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4317106 Here, we add a paramterization for deciduous forest to simulate the leafless state of deciduous-dominated regions outside of the short vegetative period in summer. This is achieved by allowing for a separate leaf area index defined by a rough parameterization of a leaf-on and a leaf-off season (10. October - 10. April) based on literature values from Spasskaya Pad. Further, more realistic mixed canopy compositions can now be simulated by allowing for a certain percentage of deciduous taxa within the simulated forest stand. In addition, we add a parameterization for coupling forest density (LAI) to fine root biomass. Further, we have implemented a new relationship for phase partitioning of water in frozen soil (freeze curve). The parameters are set to the default values that were used for the simulations in the article. Parameters different from the default values can be specified in the main script run_CG_RUN_1D_STANDARD.m (general parameters, run number, etc.) and in the excel table \results\test_vegetation_snow_1\ test_vegetation_snow_1.xlsx (run-specific parameters). To start the program, run the script run_CG_RUN_1D_STANDARD.m. The default output directory is .\results\. Further updates to the model code can be found here: https://github.com/CryoGrid/CryoGrid/tree/vegetation Updates and documentation of the Permafrost model CryoGrid can be found here: https://github.com/CryoGrid. The model is further described in this publication: Westermann, S., Langer, M., Boike, J., Heikenfeld, M., Peter, M., Etzelmüller, B., & Krinner, G. (2016). Simulating the thermal regime and thaw processes of ice-rich permafrost ground with the land-surface model CryoGrid 3. Geosci. Model Dev., 9(2), 523–546. https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-9-523-2016. The multilayer canopy model was first published by Bonan et al. (2018): Bonan, G. B., Patton, E. G., Harman, I. N., Oleson, K. W., Finnigan, J. J., Lu, Y., and Burakowski, E. A.: Modeling canopy-induced turbulence in the Earth system: a unified parameterization of turbulent exchange within plant canopies and the roughness sublayer (CLM-ml v0), Geosci. Model Dev., 11, 1467–1496, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-11-1467-2018, 2018. {"references": ["Stuenzi, S. M., Boike, J., Cable, W., Herzschuh, U., Kruse, S., Pestryakova, L. A., Schneider von Deimling, T., Westermann, S., Zakharov, E. S., and Langer, M.: Variability of the surface energy balance in permafrost-underlain boreal forest, Biogeosciences, 18, 343\u2013365, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-343-2021, 2021. The model code for this publication can be found here: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4317106", "Westermann, S., Langer, M., Boike, J., Heikenfeld, M., Peter, M., Etzelm\u00fcller, B., & Krinner, G. (2016). Simulating the thermal regime and thaw processes of ice-rich permafrost ground with the land-surface model CryoGrid 3.\u00a0Geosci. Model Dev., 9(2), 523\u2013546.\u00a0https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-9-523-2016.", "Bonan, G. B., Patton, E. G., Harman, I. N., Oleson, K. W., Finnigan, J. J., Lu, Y., and Burakowski, E. A.: Modeling canopy-induced turbulence in the Earth system: a unified parameterization of turbulent exchange within plant canopies and the roughness sublayer (CLM-ml v0), Geosci. Model Dev., 11, 1467\u20131496, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-11-1467-2018, 2018."]}

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Angelopoulos, Michael; Overduin, Pier Paul; Jenrich, Maren; Nitze, Ingmar; Günther, Frank; Strauss, Jens; Westermann, Sebastian; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Kholodov, Alexander L; Krautblatter, Michael; +2 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | Nunataryuk (773421), EC | PETA-CARB (338335)

    In July 2017, we collected apparent resistivity data (ohm-m) in a sub-aquatic permafrost environment on the southern coastline of the Bykovsky Peninsula in northeast Siberia. The project goal was to determine the depth to the top of frozen sediment for multiple submerged landscapes. The submerged landscapes included ice-rich Yedoma permafrost, permafrost that had undergone prior thermokarst (Alases), and a former lagoon (i.e. offshore at the lagoon's coastline positions in earlier years). The data was collected with an IRIS Syscal Pro Deep Marine resistivity system that was equipped with a GPS and an echo-sounder to record water depths. The geoelectric cable had an electrode separation of 10 m and the electrodes were arranged in a reciprocal Wenner Schlumberger array. The offset between the first electrode and the boat was approximately 10 m.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stuenzi, Simone M.; Boike, Julia; Cable, William; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Kruse, Stefan; Pestryakova, Luidmila A.; Schneider von Deimling, Thomas; Westermann, Sebastian; Zakharov, Evgeniy S.; Langer, Moritz;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | GlacialLegacy (772852), EC | GlacialLegacy (772852)

    CryoGrid is a land-surface scheme dedicated to modeling of ground temperatures in permafrost environments. Here, the one-dimensional land surface model (CryoGrid) is adapted for the application in vegetated areas by coupling a multilayer canopy model (CLM-ml v0). This model setup is used to reproduce the energy transfer and thermal regime at a study site in mixed boreal forest in Eastern Siberia. The vegetation module forms the upper boundary layer of the coupled vegetation-permafrost model and replaces the surface energy balance equation used for common CryoGrid representations. The model is described in the following article which has been published in Biogeosciences: Stuenzi, S. M., Boike, J., Cable, W., Herzschuh, U., Kruse, S., Pestryakova, L. A., Schneider von Deimling, T., Westermann, S., Zakharov, E. S., and Langer, M.: Variability of the surface energy balance in permafrost-underlain boreal forest, Biogeosciences, 18, 343–365, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-343-2021, 2021. The parameters are set to the default values that were used for the simulations in the article. Parameters different from the default values can be specified in the main script main.m (general parameters, run number, etc.) and in the excel table \results\test_oldCG_334\ test_oldCG_334.xlsx (run-specific parameters). To start the program, run the script main.m. The default output directory is .\results\. Further updates to the model code can be found here: https://github.com/CryoGrid/CryoGrid/tree/vegetation Updates and documentation of the Permafrost model CryoGrid can be found here: https://github.com/CryoGrid. The model is further described in this publication: Westermann, S., Langer, M., Boike, J., Heikenfeld, M., Peter, M., Etzelmüller, B., & Krinner, G. (2016). Simulating the thermal regime and thaw processes of ice-rich permafrost ground with the land-surface model CryoGrid 3. Geosci. Model Dev., 9(2), 523–546. https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-9-523-2016. The multilayer canopy model was first published by Bonan et al. (2018): Modeling canopy-induced turbulence in the Earth system: a unified parameterization of turbulent exchange within plant canopies and the roughness sublayer (CLM-ml v0) (https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-11-1467-2018). {"references": ["Stuenzi et al. (2021):\u00a0Variability of the Surface Energy Balance in Permafrost Underlain Boreal Forest\u00a0(DOI:\u00a010.5194/bg-2020-201)", "Bonan et al. (2018):\u00a0Modeling canopy-induced turbulence in the Earth system: a unified parameterization of turbulent exchange within plant canopies and the roughness sublayer (CLM-ml v0) (DOI: 10.5194/gmd-11-1467-2018)", "Westermann et al. (2013):\u00a0Transient thermal modeling of permafrost conditions in Southern Norway (DOI: 10.5194/tc-7-719-2013)"]}