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27 Research products, page 1 of 3

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vries, Joost; Monteiro, Fanny; Wheeler, Glen; Poulton, Alex; Godrijan, Jelena; Cerino, Federica; Malinverno, Elisa; Langer, Gerald; Brownlee, Colin;
    Project: EC | MEDSEA (265103), MZOS | Mechanism of long-term ch... (098-0982705-2731), EC | SEACELLS (670390), UKRI | NSFGEO-NERC An unexpected... (NE/N011708/1), UKRI | GW4+ - a consortium of ex... (NE/L002434/1)

    Coccolithophores are globally important marine calcifying phytoplankton that utilize a haplo-diplontic life cycle. The haplo-diplontic life cycle allows coccolithophores to divide in both life cycle phases and potentially expands coccolithophore niche volume. Research has, however, to date largely overlooked the life cycle of coccolithophores and has instead focused on the diploid life cycle phase of coccolithophores. Through the synthesis and analysis of global scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coccolithophore abundance data (n=2534), we find that calcified haploid coccolithophores generally constitute a minor component of the total coccolithophore abundance (≈ 2 %–15 % depending on season). However, using case studies in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea, we show that, depending on environmental conditions, calcifying haploid coccolithophores can be significant contributors to the coccolithophore standing stock (up to ≈30 %). Furthermore, using hypervolumes to quantify the niche of coccolithophores, we illustrate that the haploid and diploid life cycle phases inhabit contrasting niches and that on average this allows coccolithophores to expand their niche by ≈18.8 %, with a range of 3 %–76 % for individual species. Our results highlight that future coccolithophore research should consider both life cycle stages, as omission of the haploid life cycle phase in current research limits our understanding of coccolithophore ecology. Our results furthermore suggest a different response to nutrient limitation and stratification, which may be of relevance for further climate scenarios. Our compilation highlights the spatial and temporal sparsity of SEM measurements and the need for new molecular techniques to identify uncalcified haploid coccolithophores. Our work also emphasizes the need for further work on the carbonate chemistry niche of the coccolithophore life cycle.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maffezzoli, Niccolò; Vallelonga, Paul; Edwards, Ross; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Turetta, Clara; Kjær, Helle Astrid; Barbante, Carlo; Vinther, Bo; Spolaor, Andrea;
    Project: EC | ICE2ICE (610055), EC | CLIMAHAL (726349)

    Although it has been demonstrated that the speed and magnitude of the recent Arctic sea ice decline is unprecedented for the past 1450 years, few records are available to provide a paleoclimate context for Arctic sea ice extent. Bromine enrichment in ice cores has been suggested to indicate the extent of newly formed sea ice areas. Despite the similarities among sea ice indicators and ice core bromine enrichment records, uncertainties still exist regarding the quantitative linkages between bromine reactive chemistry and the first-year sea ice surfaces. Here we present a 120 000-year record of bromine enrichment from the RECAP (REnland ice CAP) ice core, coastal east Greenland, and interpret it as a record of first-year sea ice. We compare it to existing sea ice records from marine cores and tentatively reconstruct past sea ice conditions in the North Atlantic as far north as the Fram Strait (50–85∘ N). Our interpretation implies that during the last deglaciation, the transition from multi-year to first-year sea ice started at ∼17.5 ka, synchronously with sea ice reductions observed in the eastern Nordic Seas and with the increase in North Atlantic ocean temperature. First-year sea ice reached its maximum at 12.4–11.8 ka during the Younger Dryas, after which open-water conditions started to dominate, consistent with sea ice records from the eastern Nordic Seas and the North Icelandic shelf. Our results show that over the last 120 000 years, multi-year sea ice extent was greatest during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 and possibly during MIS 4, with more extended first-year sea ice during MIS 3 and MIS 5. Sea ice extent during the Holocene (MIS 1) has been less than at any time in the last 120 000 years.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Paradis, Sarah; Pusceddu, Antonio; Masqué, Pere; Puig, Pere; Moccia, Davide; Russo, Tommaso; Iacono, Claudio;
    Project: EC | EUROFLEETS2 (312762)

    Bottom trawling in the deep sea is one of the main drivers of sediment resuspension, eroding the seafloor and altering the content and composition of sedimentary organic matter (OM). The physical and biogeochemical impacts of bottom trawling were studied on the continental slope of the Gulf of Castellammare, Sicily (southwestern Mediterranean), through the analysis of two triplicate sediment cores collected at trawled and untrawled sites (∼550 m water depth) during the summer of 2016. Geochemical and sedimentological parameters (excess 210Pb, excess 234Th, 137Cs, dry bulk density, and grain size), elemental (organic carbon and nitrogen) and biochemical composition of sedimentary OM (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids), as well as its freshness (phytopigments) and degradation rates were determined in both coring locations. The untrawled site had a sedimentation rate of 0.15 cm yr−1 and presented a 6 cm thick surface mixed layer that contained siltier sediment with low excess 210Pb concentrations, possibly resulting from the resuspension, posterior advection, and eventual deposition of coarser and older sediment from adjacent trawling grounds. In contrast, the trawled site was eroded and presented compacted century-old sediment highly depleted in OM components, which were between 20 % and 60 % lower than those in the untrawled site. However, the upper 2 cm of the trawled site consisted of recently accumulated sediments enriched in excess 234Th, excess 210Pb, and phytopigments, while OM contents were similar to those from the untrawled core. This fresh sediment supported protein turnover rates of 0.025 d−1, which doubled those quantified in surface sediments of the untrawled site. The enhancement of remineralization rates in surface sediment of the trawled site was associated with the arrival of fresh particles on a chronically trawled deep-sea region that is generally deprived of OM. We conclude that the detrimental effects of bottom trawling can be temporarily and partially abated by the arrival of fresh and nutritionally rich OM, which stimulate the response of benthic communities. However, these ephemeral deposits are likely to be swiftly eroded due to the high trawling frequency over fishing grounds, highlighting the importance of establishing science-based management strategies to mitigate the impacts of bottom trawling.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vilibić, Ivica; Mihanović, Hrvoje; Janeković, Ivica; Denamiel, Cléa; Poulain, Pierre-Marie; Orlić, Mirko; Dunić, Natalija; Dadić, Vlado; Pasarić, Mira; Muslim, Stipe; +8 more
    Project: EC | EUROFLEETS2 (312762)

    The paper investigates the wintertime dynamics of the coastal northeastern Adriatic Sea and is based on numerical modelling and in situ data collected through field campaigns executed during the winter and spring of 2015. The data were collected with a variety of instruments and platforms (acoustic Doppler current profilers, conductivity–temperature–depth probes, glider, profiling float) and are accompanied by the atmosphere–ocean ALADIN/ROMS modelling system. The research focused on the dense-water formation (DWF), thermal changes, circulation, and water exchange between the coastal and open Adriatic. According to both observations and modelling results, dense waters are formed in the northeastern coastal Adriatic during cold bora outbreaks. However, the dense water formed in this coastal region has lower densities than the dense water formed in the open Adriatic due to lower salinities. Since the coastal area is deeper than the open Adriatic, the observations indicate (i) balanced inward–outward exchange at the deep connecting channels of denser waters coming from the open Adriatic DWF site and less-dense waters coming from the coastal region and (ii) outward flow of less-dense waters dominating in the intermediate and surface layers. The latter phenomenon was confirmed by the model, even if it significantly underestimates the currents and transports in the connecting channels. The median residence time of the coastal area is estimated to be approximately 20 days, indicating that the coastal area may be renewed relatively quickly by the open Adriatic waters. The data that were obtained represent a comprehensive marine dataset that can be used to calibrate atmospheric and oceanic numerical models and point to several interesting phenomena to be investigated in the future.

  • Research software . 2019
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Fabio Sinibaldi;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | AGINFRA PLUS (731001), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | ENVRI (283465), EC | BlueBRIDGE (675680), EC | EUBRAZILOPENBIO (288754), EC | PARTHENOS (654119), EC | EGI-Engage (654142), EC | SoBigData (654024), EC | D4SCIENCE (212488), EC | IMARINE (283644),...

    The gCube System - ws-thredds -------------------------------------------------- prototype of WS integration with data-transfer for Thredds pubblication This software is part of the gCube Framework (https://www.gcube-system.org/): an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments by favouring the realisation of reuse oriented policies. The projects leading to this software have received funding from a series of European Union programmes including: * the Sixth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development - DILIGENT (grant no. 004260); * the Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration - D4Science (grant no. 212488), D4Science-II (grant no. 239019),ENVRI (grant no. 283465), EUBrazilOpenBio (grant no. 288754), iMarine (grant no. 283644); * the H2020 research and innovation programme - BlueBRIDGE (grant no. 675680), EGIEngage (grant no. 654142), ENVRIplus (grant no. 654182), Parthenos (grant no. 654119), SoBigData (grant no. 654024); Version -------------------------------------------------- 0.0.2-4.8.0-158727 (2017-12-01) Please see the file named "changelog.xml" in this directory for the release notes. Authors -------------------------------------------------- * Fabio Sinibaldi (fabio.sinibaldi-AT-isti.cnr.it) Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazione "A. Faedo" - CNR, Pisa (Italy). Maintainers ----------- * Fabio Sinibaldi (fabio.sinibaldi-AT-isti.cnr.it) Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazione "A. Faedo" - CNR, Pisa (Italy). Download information -------------------------------------------------- Source code is available from SVN: http://svn.research-infrastructures.eu/d4science/gcube/trunk/portlets/user/ws-thredds/ws-thredds Binaries can be downloaded from the gCube website: https://www.gcube-system.org/ Installation -------------------------------------------------- Installation documentation is available on-line in the gCube Wiki: https://wiki.gcube-system.org/gcube/index.php/Tabular_Data_Manager Documentation -------------------------------------------------- Documentation is available on-line in the gCube Wiki: https://wiki.gcube-system.org/gcube/index.php/Tabular_Data_Manager https://wiki.gcube-system.org/gcube/index.php/Tabular_Data_Manager Support -------------------------------------------------- Bugs and support requests can be reported in the gCube issue tracking tool: https://support.d4science.org/projects/gcube/ Licensing -------------------------------------------------- This software is licensed under the terms you may find in the file named "LICENSE" in this directory.

  • Research software . 2019
    Open Access English

    The gCube System - Information System Bom -------------------------------------------------- Used to declare version used from different projects This software is part of the gCube Framework (https://www.gcube-system.org/): an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments by favouring the realisation of reuse oriented policies. The projects leading to this software have received funding from a series of European Union programmes including: * the Sixth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development - DILIGENT (grant no. 004260); * the Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration - D4Science (grant no. 212488), D4Science-II (grant no. 239019),ENVRI (grant no. 283465), EUBrazilOpenBio (grant no. 288754), iMarine (grant no. 283644); * the H2020 research and innovation programme - BlueBRIDGE (grant no. 675680), EGIEngage (grant no. 654142), ENVRIplus (grant no. 654182), Parthenos (grant no. 654119), SoBigData (grant no. 654024); Version -------------------------------------------------- 1.2.0-4.6.0-148764 (2017-07-31) Please see the file named "changelog.xml" in this directory for the release notes. Authors -------------------------------------------------- * Luca Frosini (luca.frosini-AT-isti.cnr.it), Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazione "A. Faedo" - CNR, Pisa (Italy). Maintainers ----------- * Luca Frosini (luca.frosini-AT-isti.cnr.it), Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazione "A. Faedo" - CNR, Pisa (Italy). Download information -------------------------------------------------- Source code is available from SVN: https://svn.research-infrastructures.eu/public/d4science/gcube/trunk/information-system/information-system-bom Binaries can be downloaded from the gCube website: https://www.gcube-system.org/ Installation -------------------------------------------------- Installation documentation is available on-line in the gCube Wiki: https://wiki.gcube-system.org/gcube/index.php/InformationSystem Documentation -------------------------------------------------- Documentation is available on-line in the gCube Wiki: https://wiki.gcube-system.org/gcube/index.php/InformationSystem Support -------------------------------------------------- Bugs and support requests can be reported in the gCube issue tracking tool: https://support.d4science.org/projects/gcube/ Licensing -------------------------------------------------- This software is licensed under the terms you may find in the file named "LICENSE" in this directory.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Guerra, Davide; Schroeder, Katrin; Borghini, Mireno; Camatti, Elisa; Pansera, Marco; Schroeder, Anna; Sparnocchia, Stefania; Chiggiato, Jacopo;
    Project: EC | JERICO-NEXT (654410), EC | OCEAN-CERTAIN (603773)

    Diel vertical migration (DVM) is a survival strategy adopted by zooplankton that we investigated in the Corsica Channel using acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data from April 2014 to November 2016. The principal aim of the study is to characterize migration patterns and biomass temporal evolution of zooplankton along the water column. The ADCP measured vertical velocity and echo intensity in the water column range between about 70 and 390 m (the bottom depth is 443 m). During the investigated period, zooplanktonic biomass had a well-defined daily and seasonal cycle, with peaks occurring in late winter to spring (2015 and 2016) when the stratification of the water column is weaker. Zooplanktonic biomass temporal distribution in the whole water column is well correlated with biomass of primary producers, estimated with satellite data. Zooplanktonic blooming and non-blooming periods have been identified and studied separately. During the non-blooming period zooplanktonic biomass was most abundant in the upper and the deep layers, while during the blooming period the upper-layer maximum in zooplanktonic biomass disappeared and the deep layer with high zooplanktonic biomass became thicker. These two layers are likely to correspond to two different zooplanktonic communities. The evolution of zooplanktonic biomass is well correlated with chlorophyll, with phytoplankton biomass peaks preceding the upper-layer secondary production by a lag of about 3.5 weeks. Nocturnal DVM appears to be the main pattern during both periods, but reverse and twilight migration are also detected. Nocturnal DVM was more evident at mid-water than in the deep and the upper layers. DVM occurred with different intensities during blooming and non-blooming periods. One of the main outcomes is that the principal drivers for DVM are light intensity and stratification, but other factors, like the moon cycle and primary production, are also taken in consideration.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gasparin, Florent; Guinehut, Stephanie; Mao, Chongyuan; Mirouze, Isabelle; Rémy, Elisabeth; King, Robert R.; Hamon, Mathieu; Reid, Rebecca; Storto, Andrea; Le Traon, Pierre-Yves; +2 more
    Project: EC | AtlantOS (633211)

    A coordinated effort, based on observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs), has been carried out by four European ocean forecasting centers for the first time, in order to provide insights on the present and future design of the in situ Atlantic Ocean observing system from a monitoring and forecasting perspective. This multi-system approach is based on assimilating synthetic data sets, obtained by sub-sampling in space and time using an eddy-resolving unconstrained simulation, named the Nature Run. To assess the ability of a given Atlantic Ocean observing system to constrain the ocean model state, a set of assimilating experiments were performed using four global eddy-permitting systems. For each set of experiments, different designs of the in situ observing system were assimilated, such as implementing a global drifter array equipped with a thermistor chain down to 150 m depth or extending a part of the global Argo array in the deep ocean. While results from the four systems show similarities and differences, the comparison of the experiments with the Nature Run, generally demonstrates a positive impact of the different extra observation networks on the temperature and salinity fields. The spread of the multi-system simulations, combined with the sensitivity of each system to the evaluated observing networks, allowed us to discuss the robustness of the results and their dependence on the specific analysis system. By helping define and test future observing systems from an integrated observing system view, the present work is an initial step toward better-coordinated initiatives supporting the evolution of the ocean observing system and its integration within ocean monitoring and forecasting systems. Refereed 14.A Manual (incl. handbook, guide, cookbook etc) 2019-03-14

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Galgani, Luisa; Engel, Anja; Rossi, Claudio; Donati, Alessandro; Loiselle, Steven Arthur;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | POSEIDOMM (702747)

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is the photo-reactive fraction of the marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool. Changes in CDOM quality and quantity have impacts on marine microbial dynamics and the underwater light environment. One major source of CDOM is produced by marine bacteria through their alteration of pre-existing DOM substrates. In a series of microcosm experiments in controlled marine conditions, we explored the impact of polystyrene microplastics on the quality and quantity of microbial CDOM, observing an increased production of CDOM with changes in its molecular weight, which resulted from either an increased microbial CDOM production or an enhanced transformation of DOM from lower to higher molecular weight CDOM. This open dataset reports CDOM, bacteria, DOC and oxygen data collected in the series of microcosm experiments recently published. They refer to Experimental Set-up 1 and Experimental Set-up 2 (ES1, ES2). The CDOM data from the blank control experiment are also reported.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    N, Teixidó; MC, Gambi; V, Parravacini; K, Kroeker; F, Micheli; S, Villéger; E, Ballesteros;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | Future4Oceans (702628), EC | BANDIERA (600407)

    This repository contains the data files and R codes used to analyze the data and generate the results for this research article. Nuria Teixidó, Maria Cristina Gambi, Valeriano Parravacini, Kristy Kroeker, Fiorenza Micheli, Sebastien Villéger, Enric Ballesteros (2018) Functional biodiversity loss along natural CO2 gradients. Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-07592-1. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-07592-1 Abstract: The effects of environmental change on biodiversity are still poorly understood. In particular, the consequences of shifts in species composition for marine ecosystem function are largely unknownwe assess the loss of functional diversity, i.e. the range of species biological traits, in benthic marine communities exposed to ocean acidification (OA) by using natural CO2 vent systems. We found that functional richness is greatly reduced with acidification, and that functional loss is more pronounced than the corresponding decrease in taxonomic diversity. In acidified conditions, most organisms accounted for a few functional entities (i.e. unique combination of functional traits), resulting in low functional redundancy. These results suggest that functional richness is not buffered by functional redundancy under OA, even in highly diverse assemblages, such as rocky benthic communities. This research was supported by the National Geographic Society (Window to the Future, Grant No. 9771-15) and the Total Foundation (High-CO2 Seas project, Grant No. BIO-2016-081-4). NT was supported by a Maire Curie- Cofund (FP7-PEOPLE- Marie Curie Bandiera- Cofund, GA No. 600407) and by a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Global Fellowship under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (H2020-MSCA- IF- 2015, GA No. 702628).

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
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The following results are related to European Marine Science. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
27 Research products, page 1 of 3
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vries, Joost; Monteiro, Fanny; Wheeler, Glen; Poulton, Alex; Godrijan, Jelena; Cerino, Federica; Malinverno, Elisa; Langer, Gerald; Brownlee, Colin;
    Project: EC | MEDSEA (265103), MZOS | Mechanism of long-term ch... (098-0982705-2731), EC | SEACELLS (670390), UKRI | NSFGEO-NERC An unexpected... (NE/N011708/1), UKRI | GW4+ - a consortium of ex... (NE/L002434/1)

    Coccolithophores are globally important marine calcifying phytoplankton that utilize a haplo-diplontic life cycle. The haplo-diplontic life cycle allows coccolithophores to divide in both life cycle phases and potentially expands coccolithophore niche volume. Research has, however, to date largely overlooked the life cycle of coccolithophores and has instead focused on the diploid life cycle phase of coccolithophores. Through the synthesis and analysis of global scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coccolithophore abundance data (n=2534), we find that calcified haploid coccolithophores generally constitute a minor component of the total coccolithophore abundance (≈ 2 %–15 % depending on season). However, using case studies in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea, we show that, depending on environmental conditions, calcifying haploid coccolithophores can be significant contributors to the coccolithophore standing stock (up to ≈30 %). Furthermore, using hypervolumes to quantify the niche of coccolithophores, we illustrate that the haploid and diploid life cycle phases inhabit contrasting niches and that on average this allows coccolithophores to expand their niche by ≈18.8 %, with a range of 3 %–76 % for individual species. Our results highlight that future coccolithophore research should consider both life cycle stages, as omission of the haploid life cycle phase in current research limits our understanding of coccolithophore ecology. Our results furthermore suggest a different response to nutrient limitation and stratification, which may be of relevance for further climate scenarios. Our compilation highlights the spatial and temporal sparsity of SEM measurements and the need for new molecular techniques to identify uncalcified haploid coccolithophores. Our work also emphasizes the need for further work on the carbonate chemistry niche of the coccolithophore life cycle.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maffezzoli, Niccolò; Vallelonga, Paul; Edwards, Ross; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Turetta, Clara; Kjær, Helle Astrid; Barbante, Carlo; Vinther, Bo; Spolaor, Andrea;
    Project: EC | ICE2ICE (610055), EC | CLIMAHAL (726349)

    Although it has been demonstrated that the speed and magnitude of the recent Arctic sea ice decline is unprecedented for the past 1450 years, few records are available to provide a paleoclimate context for Arctic sea ice extent. Bromine enrichment in ice cores has been suggested to indicate the extent of newly formed sea ice areas. Despite the similarities among sea ice indicators and ice core bromine enrichment records, uncertainties still exist regarding the quantitative linkages between bromine reactive chemistry and the first-year sea ice surfaces. Here we present a 120 000-year record of bromine enrichment from the RECAP (REnland ice CAP) ice core, coastal east Greenland, and interpret it as a record of first-year sea ice. We compare it to existing sea ice records from marine cores and tentatively reconstruct past sea ice conditions in the North Atlantic as far north as the Fram Strait (50–85∘ N). Our interpretation implies that during the last deglaciation, the transition from multi-year to first-year sea ice started at ∼17.5 ka, synchronously with sea ice reductions observed in the eastern Nordic Seas and with the increase in North Atlantic ocean temperature. First-year sea ice reached its maximum at 12.4–11.8 ka during the Younger Dryas, after which open-water conditions started to dominate, consistent with sea ice records from the eastern Nordic Seas and the North Icelandic shelf. Our results show that over the last 120 000 years, multi-year sea ice extent was greatest during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 and possibly during MIS 4, with more extended first-year sea ice during MIS 3 and MIS 5. Sea ice extent during the Holocene (MIS 1) has been less than at any time in the last 120 000 years.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Paradis, Sarah; Pusceddu, Antonio; Masqué, Pere; Puig, Pere; Moccia, Davide; Russo, Tommaso; Iacono, Claudio;
    Project: EC | EUROFLEETS2 (312762)

    Bottom trawling in the deep sea is one of the main drivers of sediment resuspension, eroding the seafloor and altering the content and composition of sedimentary organic matter (OM). The physical and biogeochemical impacts of bottom trawling were studied on the continental slope of the Gulf of Castellammare, Sicily (southwestern Mediterranean), through the analysis of two triplicate sediment cores collected at trawled and untrawled sites (∼550 m water depth) during the summer of 2016. Geochemical and sedimentological parameters (excess 210Pb, excess 234Th, 137Cs, dry bulk density, and grain size), elemental (organic carbon and nitrogen) and biochemical composition of sedimentary OM (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids), as well as its freshness (phytopigments) and degradation rates were determined in both coring locations. The untrawled site had a sedimentation rate of 0.15 cm yr−1 and presented a 6 cm thick surface mixed layer that contained siltier sediment with low excess 210Pb concentrations, possibly resulting from the resuspension, posterior advection, and eventual deposition of coarser and older sediment from adjacent trawling grounds. In contrast, the trawled site was eroded and presented compacted century-old sediment highly depleted in OM components, which were between 20 % and 60 % lower than those in the untrawled site. However, the upper 2 cm of the trawled site consisted of recently accumulated sediments enriched in excess 234Th, excess 210Pb, and phytopigments, while OM contents were similar to those from the untrawled core. This fresh sediment supported protein turnover rates of 0.025 d−1, which doubled those quantified in surface sediments of the untrawled site. The enhancement of remineralization rates in surface sediment of the trawled site was associated with the arrival of fresh particles on a chronically trawled deep-sea region that is generally deprived of OM. We conclude that the detrimental effects of bottom trawling can be temporarily and partially abated by the arrival of fresh and nutritionally rich OM, which stimulate the response of benthic communities. However, these ephemeral deposits are likely to be swiftly eroded due to the high trawling frequency over fishing grounds, highlighting the importance of establishing science-based management strategies to mitigate the impacts of bottom trawling.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vilibić, Ivica; Mihanović, Hrvoje; Janeković, Ivica; Denamiel, Cléa; Poulain, Pierre-Marie; Orlić, Mirko; Dunić, Natalija; Dadić, Vlado; Pasarić, Mira; Muslim, Stipe; +8 more
    Project: EC | EUROFLEETS2 (312762)

    The paper investigates the wintertime dynamics of the coastal northeastern Adriatic Sea and is based on numerical modelling and in situ data collected through field campaigns executed during the winter and spring of 2015. The data were collected with a variety of instruments and platforms (acoustic Doppler current profilers, conductivity–temperature–depth probes, glider, profiling float) and are accompanied by the atmosphere–ocean ALADIN/ROMS modelling system. The research focused on the dense-water formation (DWF), thermal changes, circulation, and water exchange between the coastal and open Adriatic. According to both observations and modelling results, dense waters are formed in the northeastern coastal Adriatic during cold bora outbreaks. However, the dense water formed in this coastal region has lower densities than the dense water formed in the open Adriatic due to lower salinities. Since the coastal area is deeper than the open Adriatic, the observations indicate (i) balanced inward–outward exchange at the deep connecting channels of denser waters coming from the open Adriatic DWF site and less-dense waters coming from the coastal region and (ii) outward flow of less-dense waters dominating in the intermediate and surface layers. The latter phenomenon was confirmed by the model, even if it significantly underestimates the currents and transports in the connecting channels. The median residence time of the coastal area is estimated to be approximately 20 days, indicating that the coastal area may be renewed relatively quickly by the open Adriatic waters. The data that were obtained represent a comprehensive marine dataset that can be used to calibrate atmospheric and oceanic numerical models and point to several interesting phenomena to be investigated in the future.

  • Research software . 2019
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Fabio Sinibaldi;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | AGINFRA PLUS (731001), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | ENVRI (283465), EC | BlueBRIDGE (675680), EC | EUBRAZILOPENBIO (288754), EC | PARTHENOS (654119), EC | EGI-Engage (654142), EC | SoBigData (654024), EC | D4SCIENCE (212488), EC | IMARINE (283644),...

    The gCube System - ws-thredds -------------------------------------------------- prototype of WS integration with data-transfer for Thredds pubblication This software is part of the gCube Framework (https://www.gcube-system.org/): an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments by favouring the realisation of reuse oriented policies. The projects leading to this software have received funding from a series of European Union programmes including: * the Sixth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development - DILIGENT (grant no. 004260); * the Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration - D4Science (grant no. 212488), D4Science-II (grant no. 239019),ENVRI (grant no. 283465), EUBrazilOpenBio (grant no. 288754), iMarine (grant no. 283644); * the H2020 research and innovation programme - BlueBRIDGE (grant no. 675680), EGIEngage (grant no. 654142), ENVRIplus (grant no. 654182), Parthenos (grant no. 654119), SoBigData (grant no. 654024); Version -------------------------------------------------- 0.0.2-4.8.0-158727 (2017-12-01) Please see the file named "changelog.xml" in this directory for the release notes. Authors -------------------------------------------------- * Fabio Sinibaldi (fabio.sinibaldi-AT-isti.cnr.it) Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazione "A. Faedo" - CNR, Pisa (Italy). Maintainers ----------- * Fabio Sinibaldi (fabio.sinibaldi-AT-isti.cnr.it) Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazione "A. Faedo" - CNR, Pisa (Italy). Download information -------------------------------------------------- Source code is available from SVN: http://svn.research-infrastructures.eu/d4science/gcube/trunk/portlets/user/ws-thredds/ws-thredds Binaries can be downloaded from the gCube website: https://www.gcube-system.org/ Installation -------------------------------------------------- Installation documentation is available on-line in the gCube Wiki: https://wiki.gcube-system.org/gcube/index.php/Tabular_Data_Manager Documentation -------------------------------------------------- Documentation is available on-line in the gCube Wiki: https://wiki.gcube-system.org/gcube/index.php/Tabular_Data_Manager https://wiki.gcube-system.org/gcube/index.php/Tabular_Data_Manager Support -------------------------------------------------- Bugs and support requests can be reported in the gCube issue tracking tool: https://support.d4science.org/projects/gcube/ Licensing -------------------------------------------------- This software is licensed under the terms you may find in the file named "LICENSE" in this directory.

  • Research software . 2019
    Open Access English

    The gCube System - Information System Bom -------------------------------------------------- Used to declare version used from different projects This software is part of the gCube Framework (https://www.gcube-system.org/): an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments by favouring the realisation of reuse oriented policies. The projects leading to this software have received funding from a series of European Union programmes including: * the Sixth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development - DILIGENT (grant no. 004260); * the Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration - D4Science (grant no. 212488), D4Science-II (grant no. 239019),ENVRI (grant no. 283465), EUBrazilOpenBio (grant no. 288754), iMarine (grant no. 283644); * the H2020 research and innovation programme - BlueBRIDGE (grant no. 675680), EGIEngage (grant no. 654142), ENVRIplus (grant no. 654182), Parthenos (grant no. 654119), SoBigData (grant no. 654024); Version -------------------------------------------------- 1.2.0-4.6.0-148764 (2017-07-31) Please see the file named "changelog.xml" in this directory for the release notes. Authors -------------------------------------------------- * Luca Frosini (luca.frosini-AT-isti.cnr.it), Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazione "A. Faedo" - CNR, Pisa (Italy). Maintainers ----------- * Luca Frosini (luca.frosini-AT-isti.cnr.it), Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazione "A. Faedo" - CNR, Pisa (Italy). Download information -------------------------------------------------- Source code is available from SVN: https://svn.research-infrastructures.eu/public/d4science/gcube/trunk/information-system/information-system-bom Binaries can be downloaded from the gCube website: https://www.gcube-system.org/ Installation -------------------------------------------------- Installation documentation is available on-line in the gCube Wiki: https://wiki.gcube-system.org/gcube/index.php/InformationSystem Documentation -------------------------------------------------- Documentation is available on-line in the gCube Wiki: https://wiki.gcube-system.org/gcube/index.php/InformationSystem Support -------------------------------------------------- Bugs and support requests can be reported in the gCube issue tracking tool: https://support.d4science.org/projects/gcube/ Licensing -------------------------------------------------- This software is licensed under the terms you may find in the file named "LICENSE" in this directory.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Guerra, Davide; Schroeder, Katrin; Borghini, Mireno; Camatti, Elisa; Pansera, Marco; Schroeder, Anna; Sparnocchia, Stefania; Chiggiato, Jacopo;
    Project: EC | JERICO-NEXT (654410), EC | OCEAN-CERTAIN (603773)

    Diel vertical migration (DVM) is a survival strategy adopted by zooplankton that we investigated in the Corsica Channel using acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data from April 2014 to November 2016. The principal aim of the study is to characterize migration patterns and biomass temporal evolution of zooplankton along the water column. The ADCP measured vertical velocity and echo intensity in the water column range between about 70 and 390 m (the bottom depth is 443 m). During the investigated period, zooplanktonic biomass had a well-defined daily and seasonal cycle, with peaks occurring in late winter to spring (2015 and 2016) when the stratification of the water column is weaker. Zooplanktonic biomass temporal distribution in the whole water column is well correlated with biomass of primary producers, estimated with satellite data. Zooplanktonic blooming and non-blooming periods have been identified and studied separately. During the non-blooming period zooplanktonic biomass was most abundant in the upper and the deep layers, while during the blooming period the upper-layer maximum in zooplanktonic biomass disappeared and the deep layer with high zooplanktonic biomass became thicker. These two layers are likely to correspond to two different zooplanktonic communities. The evolution of zooplanktonic biomass is well correlated with chlorophyll, with phytoplankton biomass peaks preceding the upper-layer secondary production by a lag of about 3.5 weeks. Nocturnal DVM appears to be the main pattern during both periods, but reverse and twilight migration are also detected. Nocturnal DVM was more evident at mid-water than in the deep and the upper layers. DVM occurred with different intensities during blooming and non-blooming periods. One of the main outcomes is that the principal drivers for DVM are light intensity and stratification, but other factors, like the moon cycle and primary production, are also taken in consideration.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gasparin, Florent; Guinehut, Stephanie; Mao, Chongyuan; Mirouze, Isabelle; Rémy, Elisabeth; King, Robert R.; Hamon, Mathieu; Reid, Rebecca; Storto, Andrea; Le Traon, Pierre-Yves; +2 more
    Project: EC | AtlantOS (633211)

    A coordinated effort, based on observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs), has been carried out by four European ocean forecasting centers for the first time, in order to provide insights on the present and future design of the in situ Atlantic Ocean observing system from a monitoring and forecasting perspective. This multi-system approach is based on assimilating synthetic data sets, obtained by sub-sampling in space and time using an eddy-resolving unconstrained simulation, named the Nature Run. To assess the ability of a given Atlantic Ocean observing system to constrain the ocean model state, a set of assimilating experiments were performed using four global eddy-permitting systems. For each set of experiments, different designs of the in situ observing system were assimilated, such as implementing a global drifter array equipped with a thermistor chain down to 150 m depth or extending a part of the global Argo array in the deep ocean. While results from the four systems show similarities and differences, the comparison of the experiments with the Nature Run, generally demonstrates a positive impact of the different extra observation networks on the temperature and salinity fields. The spread of the multi-system simulations, combined with the sensitivity of each system to the evaluated observing networks, allowed us to discuss the robustness of the results and their dependence on the specific analysis system. By helping define and test future observing systems from an integrated observing system view, the present work is an initial step toward better-coordinated initiatives supporting the evolution of the ocean observing system and its integration within ocean monitoring and forecasting systems. Refereed 14.A Manual (incl. handbook, guide, cookbook etc) 2019-03-14

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Galgani, Luisa; Engel, Anja; Rossi, Claudio; Donati, Alessandro; Loiselle, Steven Arthur;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | POSEIDOMM (702747)

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is the photo-reactive fraction of the marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool. Changes in CDOM quality and quantity have impacts on marine microbial dynamics and the underwater light environment. One major source of CDOM is produced by marine bacteria through their alteration of pre-existing DOM substrates. In a series of microcosm experiments in controlled marine conditions, we explored the impact of polystyrene microplastics on the quality and quantity of microbial CDOM, observing an increased production of CDOM with changes in its molecular weight, which resulted from either an increased microbial CDOM production or an enhanced transformation of DOM from lower to higher molecular weight CDOM. This open dataset reports CDOM, bacteria, DOC and oxygen data collected in the series of microcosm experiments recently published. They refer to Experimental Set-up 1 and Experimental Set-up 2 (ES1, ES2). The CDOM data from the blank control experiment are also reported.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    N, Teixidó; MC, Gambi; V, Parravacini; K, Kroeker; F, Micheli; S, Villéger; E, Ballesteros;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | Future4Oceans (702628), EC | BANDIERA (600407)

    This repository contains the data files and R codes used to analyze the data and generate the results for this research article. Nuria Teixidó, Maria Cristina Gambi, Valeriano Parravacini, Kristy Kroeker, Fiorenza Micheli, Sebastien Villéger, Enric Ballesteros (2018) Functional biodiversity loss along natural CO2 gradients. Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-07592-1. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-07592-1 Abstract: The effects of environmental change on biodiversity are still poorly understood. In particular, the consequences of shifts in species composition for marine ecosystem function are largely unknownwe assess the loss of functional diversity, i.e. the range of species biological traits, in benthic marine communities exposed to ocean acidification (OA) by using natural CO2 vent systems. We found that functional richness is greatly reduced with acidification, and that functional loss is more pronounced than the corresponding decrease in taxonomic diversity. In acidified conditions, most organisms accounted for a few functional entities (i.e. unique combination of functional traits), resulting in low functional redundancy. These results suggest that functional richness is not buffered by functional redundancy under OA, even in highly diverse assemblages, such as rocky benthic communities. This research was supported by the National Geographic Society (Window to the Future, Grant No. 9771-15) and the Total Foundation (High-CO2 Seas project, Grant No. BIO-2016-081-4). NT was supported by a Maire Curie- Cofund (FP7-PEOPLE- Marie Curie Bandiera- Cofund, GA No. 600407) and by a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Global Fellowship under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (H2020-MSCA- IF- 2015, GA No. 702628).