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515 Research products, page 1 of 52

  • European Marine Science
  • Open Access
  • HYPOX
  • SDSN - Greece

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Jessen, Gerdhard L; Lichtschlag, Anna; Struck, Ulrich; Boetius, Antje;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)

    Biogeochemical measurements in sediment cores collected with the submersible JAGO (pusch cores) and a TV-MUC in the Black Sea during MSM15/1, Northwest Crimea (HYPOX Project), at water depths between 152-156 m. A series of microbial mats were sampled on the hypoxic region of the Crimean Shelf. Concentrations of organic carbon (Corg) and nitrogen (N) were measured on finely powdered, freeze-dried subsamples of sediment using a using a Fisons NA-1500 elemental analyzer. For organic carbon determination samples were pre-treated with 12.5% HCl to remove carbonates. Chlorophyll a (chl a), phaeopigments (PHAEO) and chloroplastic pigment equivalents (CPE) was measured according to Schubert et al., (2005) and total hydrolyzable amino acids (THAA) and single amino acid: ASP, GLU, SER, HIS, GLY, THR, ARG, ALA, TYR, MET, VAL, PHE, ILE, LEU, LYS following Dauwe et al., 1998.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    M Namik Çagatay; Zeynep Erdem;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Olaf Pfannkuche; Bettina Domeyer; Anke Bleyer;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrew W. Dale; Victoria J. Bertics; Tina Treude; Stefan Sommer; Klaus Wallmann;
    Publisher: Copernicus Publications
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)

    This study presents benthic data from 12 samplings from February to December 2010 in a 28 m deep channel in the southwest Baltic Sea. In winter, the distribution of solutes in the porewater was strongly modulated by bioirrigation which efficiently flushed the upper 10 cm of sediment, leading to concentrations which varied little from bottom water values. Solute pumping by bioirrigation fell sharply in the summer as the bottom waters became severely hypoxic (2). At this point the giant sulfide-oxidizing bacteria Beggiatoa was visible on surface sediments. Despite an increase in O2 following mixing of the water column in November, macrofauna remained absent until the end of the sampling. Contrary to expectations, metabolites such as dissolved inorganic carbon, ammonium and hydrogen sulfide did not accumulate in the upper 10 cm during the hypoxic period when bioirrigation was absent, but instead tended toward bottom water values. This was taken as evidence for episodic bubbling of methane gas out of the sediment acting as an abiogenic irrigation process. Porewater–seawater mixing by escaping bubbles provides a pathway for enhanced nutrient release to the bottom water and may exacerbate the feedback with hypoxia. Subsurface dissolved phosphate (TPO4) peaks in excess of 400 μM developed in autumn, resulting in a very large diffusive TPO4 flux to the water column of 0.7 ± 0.2 mmol m−2 d−1. The model was not able to simulate this TPO4 source as release of iron-bound P (Fe–P) or organic P. As an alternative hypothesis, the TPO4 peak was reproduced using new kinetic expressions that allow Beggiatoa to take up porewater TPO4 and accumulate an intracellular P pool during periods with oxic bottom waters. TPO4 is then released during hypoxia, as previous published results with sulfide-oxidizing bacteria indicate. The TPO4 added to the porewater over the year by organic P and Fe–P is recycled through Beggiatoa, meaning that no additional source of TPO4 is needed to explain the TPO4 peak. Further experimental studies are needed to strengthen this conclusion and rule out Fe–P and organic P as candidate sources of ephemeral TPO4 release. A measured C/P ratio of 4 in a short space of time and dramatically increasing the internal loading of TPO4 to the overlying water.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jessen Reyes, Gerdhard L.;
    Publisher: Universität Bremen
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)

    Global warming and eutrophication promote hypoxia in aquatic systems, with projected decreases in ocean oxygenation and changes at all levels of biological organization. This PhD study investigated how spatial and temporal changes in oxygen availability affect the benthic community structure and organic matter degradation on the outer Western Crimean Shelf (Black Sea). With the onset of hypoxia the benthic community oxygen uptake rate decreased, and organic matter degradation pathways shifted from aerobic to anaerobic. Surface sediments accumulate more organic matter under hypoxic and anoxic conditions, accompanied by a decrease in faunal activity. However, microbial diversity increased towards anoxic conditions and was accompanied by an increase of microbial activity and a dominance of microbial organic matter degradation. Where the Black Sea chemocline meets the seabed, the seafloor morphology has led to the accumulation of labile organic matter. This environment harbored distinct thiotrophic mat-forming bacteria previously unnoticed in the Black Sea. The anaerobic microbial community has the potential to degrade the deposited material under anoxic conditions, increasing sulfide production that could eventually decrease the degradability of otherwise fresh organic matter. Accordingly, anoxic conditions presented three-fold more unique sulfur-bearing compounds, suggesting that sulfurization could protect organic matter from being degraded.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Naeher, Sebastian; Smittenberg, Rienk H; Schaeffer, P; Adam, P; Schubert, Carsten J;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lichtschlag, Anna; Boetius, Antje;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lichtschlag, Anna; Boetius, Antje;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Papatheodorou, George; Geraga, Maria; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Fakiris, Elias; Iatrou, Margarita; Kordella, Stavroula; Ferentinos, George;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)

    The Amvrakikos Gulf, a semi-enclosed embayment in Northwestern Greece, is approximately 35 km long and 6-15 km wide. Its maximum depth is 65 m, and it is separated from the open Ionian Sea by a beachebarrier complex. The Gulf and the Ionian Sea are connected through a narrow, elongated channel, the Preveza Straits, that is approximately 6 km long and ranges in width from 0.8 to 2 km. The channel at its entrance is approximately 2 km wide and gradually narrows, reaching a width of approximately 0.8 km at the mid-channel. The sill depth over this distance is between 2 and 10 m, including a man-made navigational channel. Past the middle, the channel gradually widens reaching a width of approximately 2.5 km, and the sill deepens to approximately 20 m.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sebastian Naeher; Rienk H Smittenberg; P Schaeffer; P Adam; Carsten J Schubert;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)
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Include:
The following results are related to European Marine Science. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
515 Research products, page 1 of 52
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Jessen, Gerdhard L; Lichtschlag, Anna; Struck, Ulrich; Boetius, Antje;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)

    Biogeochemical measurements in sediment cores collected with the submersible JAGO (pusch cores) and a TV-MUC in the Black Sea during MSM15/1, Northwest Crimea (HYPOX Project), at water depths between 152-156 m. A series of microbial mats were sampled on the hypoxic region of the Crimean Shelf. Concentrations of organic carbon (Corg) and nitrogen (N) were measured on finely powdered, freeze-dried subsamples of sediment using a using a Fisons NA-1500 elemental analyzer. For organic carbon determination samples were pre-treated with 12.5% HCl to remove carbonates. Chlorophyll a (chl a), phaeopigments (PHAEO) and chloroplastic pigment equivalents (CPE) was measured according to Schubert et al., (2005) and total hydrolyzable amino acids (THAA) and single amino acid: ASP, GLU, SER, HIS, GLY, THR, ARG, ALA, TYR, MET, VAL, PHE, ILE, LEU, LYS following Dauwe et al., 1998.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    M Namik Çagatay; Zeynep Erdem;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Olaf Pfannkuche; Bettina Domeyer; Anke Bleyer;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrew W. Dale; Victoria J. Bertics; Tina Treude; Stefan Sommer; Klaus Wallmann;
    Publisher: Copernicus Publications
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)

    This study presents benthic data from 12 samplings from February to December 2010 in a 28 m deep channel in the southwest Baltic Sea. In winter, the distribution of solutes in the porewater was strongly modulated by bioirrigation which efficiently flushed the upper 10 cm of sediment, leading to concentrations which varied little from bottom water values. Solute pumping by bioirrigation fell sharply in the summer as the bottom waters became severely hypoxic (2). At this point the giant sulfide-oxidizing bacteria Beggiatoa was visible on surface sediments. Despite an increase in O2 following mixing of the water column in November, macrofauna remained absent until the end of the sampling. Contrary to expectations, metabolites such as dissolved inorganic carbon, ammonium and hydrogen sulfide did not accumulate in the upper 10 cm during the hypoxic period when bioirrigation was absent, but instead tended toward bottom water values. This was taken as evidence for episodic bubbling of methane gas out of the sediment acting as an abiogenic irrigation process. Porewater–seawater mixing by escaping bubbles provides a pathway for enhanced nutrient release to the bottom water and may exacerbate the feedback with hypoxia. Subsurface dissolved phosphate (TPO4) peaks in excess of 400 μM developed in autumn, resulting in a very large diffusive TPO4 flux to the water column of 0.7 ± 0.2 mmol m−2 d−1. The model was not able to simulate this TPO4 source as release of iron-bound P (Fe–P) or organic P. As an alternative hypothesis, the TPO4 peak was reproduced using new kinetic expressions that allow Beggiatoa to take up porewater TPO4 and accumulate an intracellular P pool during periods with oxic bottom waters. TPO4 is then released during hypoxia, as previous published results with sulfide-oxidizing bacteria indicate. The TPO4 added to the porewater over the year by organic P and Fe–P is recycled through Beggiatoa, meaning that no additional source of TPO4 is needed to explain the TPO4 peak. Further experimental studies are needed to strengthen this conclusion and rule out Fe–P and organic P as candidate sources of ephemeral TPO4 release. A measured C/P ratio of 4 in a short space of time and dramatically increasing the internal loading of TPO4 to the overlying water.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jessen Reyes, Gerdhard L.;
    Publisher: Universität Bremen
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)

    Global warming and eutrophication promote hypoxia in aquatic systems, with projected decreases in ocean oxygenation and changes at all levels of biological organization. This PhD study investigated how spatial and temporal changes in oxygen availability affect the benthic community structure and organic matter degradation on the outer Western Crimean Shelf (Black Sea). With the onset of hypoxia the benthic community oxygen uptake rate decreased, and organic matter degradation pathways shifted from aerobic to anaerobic. Surface sediments accumulate more organic matter under hypoxic and anoxic conditions, accompanied by a decrease in faunal activity. However, microbial diversity increased towards anoxic conditions and was accompanied by an increase of microbial activity and a dominance of microbial organic matter degradation. Where the Black Sea chemocline meets the seabed, the seafloor morphology has led to the accumulation of labile organic matter. This environment harbored distinct thiotrophic mat-forming bacteria previously unnoticed in the Black Sea. The anaerobic microbial community has the potential to degrade the deposited material under anoxic conditions, increasing sulfide production that could eventually decrease the degradability of otherwise fresh organic matter. Accordingly, anoxic conditions presented three-fold more unique sulfur-bearing compounds, suggesting that sulfurization could protect organic matter from being degraded.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Naeher, Sebastian; Smittenberg, Rienk H; Schaeffer, P; Adam, P; Schubert, Carsten J;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lichtschlag, Anna; Boetius, Antje;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lichtschlag, Anna; Boetius, Antje;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Papatheodorou, George; Geraga, Maria; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Fakiris, Elias; Iatrou, Margarita; Kordella, Stavroula; Ferentinos, George;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)

    The Amvrakikos Gulf, a semi-enclosed embayment in Northwestern Greece, is approximately 35 km long and 6-15 km wide. Its maximum depth is 65 m, and it is separated from the open Ionian Sea by a beachebarrier complex. The Gulf and the Ionian Sea are connected through a narrow, elongated channel, the Preveza Straits, that is approximately 6 km long and ranges in width from 0.8 to 2 km. The channel at its entrance is approximately 2 km wide and gradually narrows, reaching a width of approximately 0.8 km at the mid-channel. The sill depth over this distance is between 2 and 10 m, including a man-made navigational channel. Past the middle, the channel gradually widens reaching a width of approximately 2.5 km, and the sill deepens to approximately 20 m.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sebastian Naeher; Rienk H Smittenberg; P Schaeffer; P Adam; Carsten J Schubert;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | HYPOX (226213)